A Popular Guide To The Observation Of Nature; Or, Hints Of Inducement To The Study Of Natural…

Paperback | July 9, 2012

byRobert Mudie

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1832 edition. Excerpt: ...as air, is EVAPORATION. 185 indeed not only small, but absolutely negative, and entirely obedient to the action of heat; and not only that, but if air is let into a larger space upon which there is no pressure, it will expand; and cool, that is, become sensibly cold, or abstract heat from other substances as it expands. And when the quantity of it in a close vessel is diminished by pumping a portion of it out, and water is placed in the vessel, and some substance is also placed in it which has more attraction for water than the air has, and which in consequence drinks up the vapour of the water as soon as it is formed, the remaining air in the vessel will become so cold that the water will be frozen into a cake of ice, even though the apparatus be in a warm room. That simple experiment throws some light upon the very general and important process of evaporation. It shows us that when water passes into a state of vapour, or becomes endowed with that dispersive motion of its particles which sends it invisibly through the air, it is really changed to a state very much resembling that of the air; and thus it may ascend among the particles of the air, in consequence of the dispersive motion which it itself acquires by being heated. So that, though the vapour is invisible, we are net to suppose that it necessarily enters into chemical combination with the air, in such a manner as that the two form one compound substance; but that it is only dispersed through the air mechanically, and rises by the general law of gravitation, just because the quantity of it which is contained in any given bulk, in a gallon for instance, is less in weight than the quantity of air contained in the same, 186 ASCENT OF VAPOUR. That this is actually the case is proved by the...

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1832 edition. Excerpt: ...as air, is EVAPORATION. 185 indeed not only small, but absolutely negative, and entirely obedient to the action of heat...

Format:PaperbackDimensions:100 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.21 inPublished:July 9, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0217428304

ISBN - 13:9780217428309

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