A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man by James Joyce

A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man

byJames Joyce

Kobo ebook | October 25, 2005

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In his first and still most widely read novel, James Joyce makes a strange peace with the traditional narrative of a young man’s self-discovery by respecting its substance while exploding its form, thereby inaugurating a literary revolution.

Published in 1916 when Joyce was already at work on Ulysses, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man is exactly what its title says and much more. In an exuberantly inventive masterpiece of subjectivity, Joyce portrays his alter ego, Stephen Dedalus, growing up in Dublin and struggling through religious and sexual guilt toward an aesthetic awakening. In part a vivid picture of Joyce’s own youthful evolution into one of the twentieth century’s greatest writers, it is also a moment in the intellectual history of an age.

From the Hardcover edition.

Title:A Portrait of the Artist as a Young ManFormat:Kobo ebookPublished:October 25, 2005Publisher:Random House Publishing GroupLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0553902067

ISBN - 13:9780553902068

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Reviews

Rated 3 out of 5 by from A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man by James Joyce, Seamus Deane The imagery in this book is so beautiful. Joyce pays particular attention to everything going on in the story which creates a very vivid atmosphere, a very tangible setting that I can picture clearly in my mind while reading.His discussion of language through this book along with the idea of national identity and person identity intrigue me. I am so glad to have finally read this in a class for school instead of just on my own to study it more in depth.
Date published: 2018-07-14
Rated 3 out of 5 by from A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man by James Joyce Thus awareness is born, awareness of oneself as the shackles of society are thrown down. Stephen realises that he does not want to be what everyone else has deemed him to be; he wants to be his own man; he wants to embrace his own desires and live the life he wants: he wants to be free. Stephen struggles, and overcomes, the fight to be his true self in the confines of Irish society, and, by extension, Joyce struggles to produce his art in the confines of traditional narrative expectation: he cannot write his masterpiece by following the rules. The beauty he wishes to express will have to take a new form. Reading it for a third time, I noticed a lot more detail, was able to keep track of more that was going on, especially with the complicated stream of consciousness style writing that Joyce employs. I love watching Stephen, the main character, grow up throughout the book, and with that the style of writing that Joyce uses to convey Stephen's thoughts, emotions, etc. The imagery in this book is so beautiful. Joyce pays particular attention to everything going on in the story which creates a very vivid atmosphere, a very tangible setting that I can picture clearly in my mind while reading.His discussion of language through this book along with the idea of national identity and person identity intrigue me. I am so glad to have finally read this in a class for school instead of just on my own to study it more in depth. I'm sure I will read this again in the future. In fact I would like to read this at least once a year.
Date published: 2018-04-07
Rated 3 out of 5 by from A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man by James Joyce Thus awareness is born, awareness of oneself as the shackles of society are thrown down. Stephen realises that he does not want to be what everyone else has deemed him to be; he wants to be his own man; he wants to embrace his own desires and live the life he wants: he wants to be free. Stephen struggles, and overcomes, the fight to be his true self in the confines of Irish society, and, by extension, Joyce struggles to produce his art in the confines of traditional narrative expectation: he cannot write his masterpiece by following the rules. The beauty he wishes to express will have to take a new form. Reading it for a third time, I noticed a lot more detail, was able to keep track of more that was going on, especially with the complicated stream of consciousness style writing that Joyce employs. I love watching Stephen, the main character, grow up throughout the book, and with that the style of writing that Joyce uses to convey Stephen's thoughts, emotions, etc. The imagery in this book is so beautiful. Joyce pays particular attention to everything going on in the story which creates a very vivid atmosphere, a very tangible setting that I can picture clearly in my mind while reading.His discussion of language through this book along with the idea of national identity and person identity intrigue me. I am so glad to have finally read this in a class for school instead of just on my own to study it more in depth. I'm sure I will read this again in the future. In fact I would like to read this at least once a year.
Date published: 2018-04-07
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Cleverly Crafted A definite must have in your library.
Date published: 2017-03-20
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Masterpiece Maybe the novel that influenced my way of thinking and my approach to modern literature. A remarkable example of Joyce's "stream of consciousness" narration style. Joyce's sensitivity and piercing observation make this my all time favorite of Joyce. Comparable to "la Robe Pretexte" by Mauriac.
Date published: 2017-01-26
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Excellent #plumreview Can be interesting as a glance into James Joyce's early life through the growth of novel's protagonist Stephen Dedalus moves ahead his efforts to find an idiosyncratic artistic voice. Worth noting that Dedalus will continue on as one of the main characters in Joyce's classic "Ulysses".
Date published: 2016-11-08