A Quality of Light by Richard WagameseA Quality of Light by Richard Wagamese

A Quality of Light

byRichard Wagamese

Paperback | March 17, 1997

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My life as a Kane was lit in the Indigos, Aquamarines and Magentas of a home built on quiet faith and prayer.  But Johnny changed all that.  Where I had stood transfixed by the gloss on the surface of living, he called me forward from the pages of the books, away from the blinders that faith can surreptitiously place upon your eyes and out into a world populated by those who live their lives in the shadow of necessary fictions.
RICHARD WAGAMESE is Ojibway from the Wabaseemoong First Nation in Ontario. A member of the Sturgeon Clan, he is one of Canada’s foremost authors and journalists. He is the author of nine novels, one collection of poetry and three memoirs. His most recent novels, Indian Horse (2012) and Medicine Walk (2014) were national bestsellers and...
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Title:A Quality of LightFormat:PaperbackDimensions:336 pages, 8.5 × 5.5 × 0.5 inPublished:March 17, 1997Publisher:Doubleday Canada

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:038525606X

ISBN - 13:9780385256063

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Reviews

Rated 4 out of 5 by from Such a great story. This author tells stories like no author I've read before, the first book I read was Indian Horse.. and it was truly eye-opening. I read this one next and plan to continue reading all of his books. Thank you author, keep it up!
Date published: 2014-10-02

From Our Editors

A Quality of Light tells of Joshua Kane, an Ojibway who has lived since infancy with his loving, adoptive, white parents. Johnny Gebhardt is white but has been interested in Indian life since he was very young. The two boys meet and find common ground and deep friendship through the game of baseball. Over the years they are divided by what each believes is truly 'Indian.'