A Really Good Brown Girl by Marilyn DumontA Really Good Brown Girl by Marilyn Dumont

A Really Good Brown Girl

byMarilyn Dumont

Paperback | April 16, 1996

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NOW AVAILABLE IN A NEW EDITION - A Really Good Brown Girl: Brick Books Classics 4, ISBN 9781771313438 - published in 2015 by Brick Books.

Marilyn Dumont's Metis heritage offers her challenges that few of us welcome. Here she turns them to opportunities: in a voice that is fierce, direct, and true, she explores and transcends the multiple boundaries imposed by society on the self. She mocks, with exasperation and sly humour, the banal exploitation of Indianness, more-Indian-than-thou oneupmanship, and white condescension and ignorance. She celebrates the person, clearly observing, who defines her own life. These are Indian poems; Canadian poems: human poems.

Marilyn Dumont, a descendant of Gabriel Dumont, is a Metis poet from northeastern Alberta. Following a career in film and video production, she is working as a Native educator and completing an MFA at the University of British Columbia. Her poems are anthologized in The Road Home, Writing the Circle, The Colour of Resistance, Locating ...
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Title:A Really Good Brown GirlFormat:PaperbackDimensions:80 pages, 8.75 × 5.5 × 0.25 inPublished:April 16, 1996

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0919626769

ISBN - 13:9780919626768

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Marilyn Dumont's Métis heritage presents her with challenges that few people would want to face. But in A Really Good Brown Girl, she turns them into opportunities. In a voice that is fierce, direct, and true, she explores and transcends the multiple boundaries imposed by society on the self. She mocks, with exasperation and sly humour, the banal exploitation of Indianness, more-Indian-than-thou one-upmanship, and white condescension and ignorance. These are Indian poems, Canadian poems, and human poems.