A Report On The Insects Of Massachusetts, Injurious To Vegetation; Publ. By The Commissioners On…

Paperback | February 4, 2012

byThaddeus William Harris

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1841. Excerpt: ... II. HAWK-MOTHS. Sphinges.) Linnaeus was led to give the name of Sphinx to the insects in his second group of the Lepidoptera, from a fancied resemblance that some of their caterpillars, when at rest, have to the Sphinx of the Egyptians. The attitude of these caterpillars is indeed very remarkable. Supporting themselves by their four or six hind-legs, they elevate the forepart of the body, and remain immovably fixed in this posture for hours together. In the winged state, the true Sphinges are known by the name of humming-bird moths, from the sound which they make in flying, and hawkmoths, from their habit of hovering in the air while taking their food. These humming-bird or hawk moths may be seen during the morning and evening twilight, flying with great swiftness from flower to flower. Their wings are long, narrow, and pointed, and are moved by powerful muscles, to accommodate which their bodies are very thick and robust. Their tongues, when uncoiled, are, for the most part, excessively long, and with them they extract the honey from the blossoms of the honey-suckle and other tubular flowers, while on the wing. Other Sphinges fly during the daytime only, and in the brightest sunshine. Then it is that our large clear-winged Sesiae make their appearance among the flowers, and regale themselves with their sweets. The fragrant Phlox is their especial favorite. From their size and form and fan-like tails, from their brilliant colors, and the manner in which they take their food, poised upon rapidly vibrating wings above the blossoms, they might readily be mistaken for humming-birds. The iEgerians are also diurnal in their habits. Their flight is swift, but not prolonged, and they usually alight while feeding. In form and color they so much resemble bees and w...

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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1841. Excerpt: ... II. HAWK-MOTHS. Sphinges.) Linnaeus was led to give the name of Sphinx to the insects in his second group of the Lepidoptera, ...

Format:PaperbackDimensions:172 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.37 inPublished:February 4, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0217672388

ISBN - 13:9780217672382

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