A Revision of Demand Theory

Paperback | April 30, 1999

byJ. R. Hicks

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When A Revision of Demand Theory was first published in 1956, the late Harry Johnson described it as "elegant in the extreme, probably the last word there is to be said on this aspect of demand theory." This landmark work by Nobel Prize winner J.R. Hicks is now available again.

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When A Revision of Demand Theory was first published in 1956, the late Harry Johnson described it as "elegant in the extreme, probably the last word there is to be said on this aspect of demand theory." This landmark work by Nobel Prize winner J.R. Hicks is now available again.

The late J.R. Hicks was formerly Drummond Professor of Political Economy, Oxford University.

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:206 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 0.55 inPublished:April 30, 1999Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198285507

ISBN - 13:9780198285502

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"The subject matter is of the highest degree of abstraction. Taking problems perplexed by the contortions of mathematicians, Ýthe author¨ has applied some logical principles, expressible in simple English, and some arithmetic, or most elementary algebra, and brought to his aid a few diagrams ofoutstanding informativeness, and thereby brought us to his conclusions. It is a superb exercise of exposition."--The Economist"A most elegant piece of economic theory, showing a preference for formal logic rather than...mathematics....An important contribution to economic theory."--The Financial Times