A Revolution in Arrears: The Development Crisis in Latin America

Hardcover | March 1, 1988

byLeland M. Wooton

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Wooton's principle thesis is that economic development in Latin America is suffering from the distress of an unfinished revolution. Decades of unchanging patterns and policies of economic development have caused social disintegration. To the untrained eye, the region is seething with instability, economic disintegration, and violent change. Why? How has this come about? In seeking an answer to these questions, the author discusses what he terms a "developmental wedge." Comprised of economic fallacies by governments in the region, management practices both in the public and private sectors, and the policies of the international financial community, this "wedge" now impedes economic growth in Latin America.

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Wooton's principle thesis is that economic development in Latin America is suffering from the distress of an unfinished revolution. Decades of unchanging patterns and policies of economic development have caused social disintegration. To the untrained eye, the region is seething with instability, economic disintegration, and violent ch...

Format:HardcoverDimensions:222 pages, 9.41 × 7.24 × 0.98 inPublished:March 1, 1988Publisher:Praeger Publishers

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0275926893

ISBN - 13:9780275926892

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?Wooton makes a spirited, intelligent argument for the role of Latin American managers and entrepreneurs in formulating progressive economic and political change in Latin America. He argues for pragmatic, problem-solving approaches to public and private issues, for more decentralized institutions, and for an optimism about Latin America's prospects. None of this is new, but Wooton's work is one of the best, presenting a well-developed case that recognizes the complexities of social and political implications. The book is informed, thoughtful, and humane; the author is critical of Chile's experiment combining brutal repression and free markets of US policy toward Latin America, which he contends has not worked for either side. Wooton's writing is lively, easy to read, and serious.?-Choice