A Series Of Unfortunate Events #10: The Slippery Slope: The Slippery Slope

Hardcover | September 23, 2003

byLemony SnicketIllustratorBrett Helquist, Michael Kupperman

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Like bad smells, uninvited weekend guests or very old eggs, there are some things that ought to be avoided.

Snicket's saga about the charming, intelligent, and grossly unlucky Baudelaire orphans continues to alarm its distressed and suspicious fans the world over. The 10th book in this outrageous publishing effort features more than the usual dose of distressing details, such as snow gnats, an organised troupe of youngsters, an evil villain with a dastardly plan, a secret headquarters and some dangerous antics you should not try at home. With the weather turning colder, this is one chilling book you would be better off without.

Ages 10+

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From Our Editors

Junior Booklovers Contest Winner Riley, age 13, Calgary, ABHere it is, Snicket fans: the longest book yet in the Series of Unfortunate Events. As followers of the series know, each book begins with the Baudelaire orphans, Violet, Klaus, and of course the youngest sibling, Sunny, heading to the residence of their next guardian. At the b...

From the Publisher

Like bad smells, uninvited weekend guests or very old eggs, there are some things that ought to be avoided. Snicket's saga about the charming, intelligent, and grossly unlucky Baudelaire orphans continues to alarm its distressed and suspicious fans the world over. The 10th book in this outrageous publishing effort features more than th...

Lemony Snicket is often despondent, mostly about his published research, which includes A Series of Unfortunate Events andThe Composer Is Dead.

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Format:HardcoverDimensions:352 pages, 7 × 5 × 1.23 inPublished:September 23, 2003Publisher:HarperCollinsLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0064410137

ISBN - 13:9780064410137

Appropriate for ages: 9 - 12

Customer Reviews of A Series Of Unfortunate Events #10: The Slippery Slope: The Slippery Slope

Reviews

Rated 4 out of 5 by from excellent very exciting
Date published: 2016-12-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Fantastic I liked the mood of this story.
Date published: 2016-11-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from about the book The book was thrilling and Carimilla Spats was in it . People left Count Olaf's troupe yay. Count Olaf captured Sunny
Date published: 2015-04-05
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Really exciting! i loved sunny's role in this book and how eroic she was and the book was again great and mysterious!
Date published: 2007-11-18
Rated 5 out of 5 by from VERY GOOD This book had me jumping off my seat! All i wanted to do was read. it was full of surprises, it made me want to read it every day/ finish it! Words can't really explane how good it was, like when, i can't tell you you have to read it!
Date published: 2006-06-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from YAH-HOO this story rules.lemony snicket may not be canadian but he still rocks.How bout we go tell all of our friends bout his books.-Katelyn,age 9
Date published: 2005-10-21
Rated 4 out of 5 by from this book is good this book is really good. I think it is the best book in all Lemony Snicket Series. It is about Violet, Klaus and Sunny when they go to the snowy mountains. Go on, BUY THE BOOK!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Date published: 2005-08-12
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...absolutely AMAZING!!! Along with the rest of the series, this book was absolutely AMAZING!!! It was really sad, but in a good way. Like when Sunny was separated from her Siblings for the first time, that made me feel really sad, but it was full of suspense, and made an interesting read. I can't imagine a better book than this! You just have to read it to find out what i mean!
Date published: 2005-07-12
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...clever and kid-friendly... A Series of Unfortunate Events continues with this tenth installment, titled, The Slippery Slope. Author Lemony Snicket continues to follow the three Baudelaire orphans in their quest to stop the evil Count Olaf from taking their family fortune. This time, Olaf kidnaps the youngest Baudelaire, Sunny. Older siblings Violet and Klaus must climb The Slippery Slope of the Mortmain Mountains to save Sunny, thwarting Count Olaf's machinations. Young adventure-book lovers will enjoy this one for its classic heroes on a journey to fight evil plot , but I think that any junior booklover can enjoy Snicket's work. Although this novel is not unlike many novels for modern young readers, lacking the warmth of the stereotypical children's book, only Snicket openly warns us of its woeful and distressing contents. Even the series' title, A Series of Unfortunate Events, suggests this. While the author's continuing warnings to skip away from this book and find something better to do quickly become redundant, I think it is precisely this unique attitude that attracts readers. Snicket's clever and kid-friendly writing style demonstrates his gift of communication. For example, he explains most big words with the phrase, [insert word], a word which here means: and then defines that word specifically for that context, complete with explanations of any inferences the word implies. His descriptive language shows that he makes it a top priority to cater to his audience. In this novel, he introduces a pair of villains; descriptions, not names, are given for their identification: they are, the man with a beard but no hair and the woman with hair but no beard. It should be known that most women are beardless (unless otherwise noted). But that latter description perfectly compliments the former, so this addition becomes not redundant, but pleasantly comical. Snicket is original because he's not the protagonist, but neither is he simply the unnamed recount-er of events. He is the narrator, who also loved a woman, Beatrice (present whereabouts unknown). Snicket says that he has dedicated [his] life to researching and recording the sad tale of the Baudelaire orphans, and sometimes he even gives explanations as to why he does or does not record certain events. From these direct author-reader conversations, we can view Snicket almost as a friend, reading about his research and catching a glimpse into his life; this is seldom seen, save for autobiographies. Actually, The Unauthorized Autobiography (by Lemony Snicket) is available to provide additional information about the author. This unique author-reader bond helps give Snicket a huge fan base. The author has created (or rather, recorded) a unique world with his clever and surprisingly stimulating writing style, and I found the book to be truly comprehensible and humorous. Throughout the book, I felt like Snicket was talking to me; it didn't feel like I was reading at all, because he always wrote like he was a friend. He's truly gifted with words, so I can't help chaffing fellow booklovers to read The Slippery Slope. So go on, pick it up!
Date published: 2005-07-12
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ...storyline was original... The three orphaned Baudelaire siblings, Violet, Klaus and Sunny, are in search of the V.F.D., a secret organization that may have information about their family. Unfortunately, in the first of a series of unfortunate events, they have been separated; while Violet and Klaus are rolling down a cliff in a caravan, Sunny has been kidnapped by the evil Count Olaf, who is trying to steal the Baudelaire fortune. Do not worry, Violet comes up with one of her brilliant ideas and saves Klaus and herself. Even then a disaster occurs that sends them walking after Count Olaf instead of riding. Walking up the mountain they meet a mysterious boy who knows quite a bit about the V.F.D. Despite her young years, Sunny is made to do all the work around Count Olaf's camp on the summit of Mount Fraught, but it also gave her the opportunity to get information and to learn the terrible fate of the V.F.D. headquarters. She only hopes her siblings are still alive. Ashes were not the only surprise for Violet and Klaus, the mysterious boy was one of their old friends' siblings, who supposedly is dead. Soon after, smoke is seen at the top of the Slippery Slope. Violet and Quigley climb up to see who sent the signal. They are surprised to see it is Sunny, but decide to leave her there for now and climb back down. Meanwhile, Klaus has found out when the V.F.D. members are meeting. They go up the Slippery Slope to retrieve Sunny. When they get up there Count Olaf's plan was not what they expected. What I really like about Snicket's writing is it describes things in a unique way like at the beginning when Violet and Klaus run into snow gnats One of the gnats had flown up and stung Klaus on the cheek, as if it were seeing if the middle Baudelaire was fun to hurt. I sometimes don't like to read descriptive books but he made the book more interesting. I didn't really like the atmosphere of the book. I don't like sad or depressing books. It wasn't so much as the events that were depressing but how the author wrote about the events. Though, I am glad the relatively happy ending left us with hope for the fate of the Baudelaires. The characters are more fantastical than real but I did meet a teacher who cleaned his glasses when he came upon question or situation and a girl who thought that tying her hair back made it easier to think. I wouldn't change much. I would only make it less depressing. Snicket wrote on the negative side of situations. I know the book is supposed to be depressing and miserable but sometimes it is tiring. What I would do is show more positive side of things. Altogether this book was enjoyable and the storyline was original. I would recommend this book to those who like adventure and those who like impossible, despairing predicaments.
Date published: 2005-07-12
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...a must-read A Slippery Return With No Flops This installment of the Series of Unfortunate Events begins with the two elder Baudelaires (Violet and Klaus) in a caravan hurling to their dooms down a jagged mountain while their baby sister, Sunny, travels upward towards the peak, captured once more by the smelly antagonist, Count Olaf. Violet's famous inventing skills come in handy again and she saves them simply by using a table, old hammocks and some sticky substances lying around. They continue their journey walking up the mountain trying to catch up to Sunny who, while in captive, is forced to cook and clean in the frosty winds for Olaf, his stylish girlfriend Esme Squalor, and his troupe of white-faced women, a hook-handed man, and three carnival freaks. During their journey the two encounter a former spoiled classmate, Carmelita Spats (The Austere Academy), who is travelling with the snow scouts and a mysterious, sweatered stranger, presumed dead, who leads Violet and Klaus up a Vertical Flame Diversion toward the V.F.D headquarters. More mysteries concerning the V.F.D. unfold, secret locations are discovered, codes are found, and all the while the two siblings and their sweatered friend must try to save Sunny. The author even makes this latest adventure in the series truly interesting by offering the elder Baudelaires a sure way to save their sister but one which would turn them to villains themselves. Will they give in to the temptation or not? The three profound protagonists are role models not only for aspiring children but adults as well. The young Baudelaires are fearless, determined and wise beyond their years. Each of them has a trait that personifies themselves: Violet with her inventive skills that extricate the Baudelaires from the most unthinkable situations, Klaus with his extensive vocabulary and researching abilities, and Sunny with her gift for biting which often helps them. Not only are they worth looking up to but many people are able to relate to them. I myself have never had to climb up a waterfall, solve the mystery of Verbal Fridge Dialogue, or cook meals for a group of villains on Mount Fraught but I have felt the type of confusion that the elder Baudelaires felt as they uncovered more puzzles after just solving some. I have experienced the frustration of having no one believe you. And I have undergone the kind of tearful happiness that comes from reuniting with loved ones. There is something in this book for everyone. This series is quite different from the sugar-coated adventure books that most children read but it is the wry humor and negativity in Snicket's writing that adds flare to his novels and which makes his works fascinatingly different. The Slippery Slope does not deliver short “ a phrase here which means gives readers a jolt of witty humor and mysterious circumstances that anyone needs mounds of to have a good read. Every true reader would love this book but especially for those who crave for something unique and inventive, The Slippery Slope is a must-read.
Date published: 2005-07-12
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...very enjoyable... The Slippery Slope is another brilliant creation by Lemony Snicket. The 10th book of the Baudelaire Childrens' Series is like all the others: funny, imaginative, and well, very enjoyable. This book tells the tale of Violet, Klaus, and Sunny Baudelaire, and is set in the Mortmain Mountains. The story begins with Violet and Klaus separated from Sunny, who is in the hands of the evil Count Olaf. Violet and Klaus begin by trying to climb up the mountain all alone. This book tells of how the Baudelaires survive another of couple of days with a few villainous characters. Along the way, they meet up with several different people and bugs, first with snow gnats (nasty little gnats who bite you for no reason at all), the Snow Scouts (a group of children heading up the Mortmain Mountains for false-spring) and Quigley Quagmire, one of the Quagmire triplets, who everyone believed to be dead. Using Violet's many inventions, Klaus' many brains, and all the information they can get from Quigley, the Baudelaires find their sister, and escape from the clutches of Count Olaf, though most likely only for a few hours. I thought that this was a wonderful book, as it left me hanging in quite a few different places. It was definitely original, I've never read another book like it (unless you count his other 9 books in this series), and I don't really think I will. I liked how he would keep telling you about a bunch of extra things during the story that weren't at all related to the plots. It kept me laughing, and hanging to every word. I was a little disappointed at one part during the story, when Quigley and Violet sit on the waterfall, and Mr. Snicket gives them some privacy . In my opinion he should have led up a little more to what was happening, as you don't know much. Perhaps, however, he just couldn't think of anything to write at that point, and anyway, it didn't lower my opinion of how satisfying and exceptional this book was. I've wondered about what it would be like to be in the position of Violet Baudelaire, and well, it's difficult- perhaps because I don't have that amount of imagination. However, I do not think I would be able to get through everything as she has because you would have to be so strong, especially at the points when the three didn't think that at least one of their parents were alive. Also, I'm not able to think up inventions like she is. :) I think anybody who likes to laugh yet aren't against feeling somewhat sad during a book would fall in love with this story and read any others just like it, and I'd recommend it to almost anyone- people who love to read and those who don't.
Date published: 2005-07-12
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...funny, sharp, appealing... Out of all books, the reason I chose A Series of Unfortunate Events: The Slippery Slope was because during fourth grade, I did an authour study on the writer, Lemony Snicket. I liked this book because it was funny, sharp, appealing and most of all ”unfortunate . If you haven't read any books in the series, the story is about three siblings, Violet, Klaus and Sunny Baudelaire whose parents die in a monstrous fire. The children are devastated by their parents' loss, but even more distressed when they are sent to live with an evil villain by the name of Count Olaf, who (in all the series) is after the Baudelaire fortune. Unfortunately, Violet, Klaus and Sunny must go through the horrible, dreadful events to stop Count Olaf from his villainous ways and save their fortune. In the Slippery Slope, it kicks off from where Count Olaf has kidnapped Sunny, and Violet and Klaus struggle to find the V.F.D. Headquarters in search of a survivor of the fire and to find out what V.F.D. actually means! Then, an unexpected survivor of a fire comes along and leads the two eldest Baudelaires to the V.F.D. Headquarters to find the place has been burned to ashes by some of Olaf's villainous friends. In order for the Baudelaire siblings to stop Olaf and his friends from burning down the last V.F.D. Headquarters, they must find out where it actually is, and how to get there. With Violet's brains and wondrous inventions, with Klaus' research and knowledge and with Sunny's teeth and ability to speak her own unique language that nobody seems to really understand, can the Baudelaires complete their mission? This book was really funny and well-written. The writer has his own style which I really like because it's creative and different, but cool. I liked the different characters in this story because they were realistic and you could really get the feel of what they were like as people. You almost feel sorry for the Baudelaire siblings and the unfortunate things they go through. I thought the first three books were the best, but this one was almost as good. People who like to laugh will love this book because it's great fun. I only thought that some parts were a bit confusing and a bit hard to believe, but it's definitely understandable in the end if you put the puzzle together. A different ending for this story would be that a helicopter comes down from the sky and the police emerge from it. They arrest Count Olaf and his gang and then the Baudelaires find out that their parents had actually survived the fire! So they live happily ever after, but this is A Series of Unfortunate Events so actually it could also end up that Count Olaf does not get caught, the Baudelaires are still on the run and they still don't know if their parents had survived the fire. A Series of Unfortunate Events, The Slippery Slope: Worth reading!
Date published: 2005-07-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...stomach-turning story... Dear Reader, It is my sad and unfortunate task to pass on the information placed in Lemony Snicket's The Slippery Slope which features the most shocking part of the Baudelaires' lives thus far. This dreadfully exciting and sadly very good account of Violet, Klaus and Sunny Baudelaires' short time on a range of not-quite-frozen mountains had me awake all night with absolute ardor and apprehension “a word which here means frightened in anticipation of the next unfortunate event that should befall on the Baudelaire children. One thing that I learned by unwillingly reading the Baudelaires' story was that if you are stuck in a terrible situation and you must climb an icy mountain in order to save your baby sister from an atrociously wicked Count and a casserole dish given as a bed -- a ukulele and a bread knife come in handy quite often. Not only was I shocked by the appearance of a very well read survivor of an awful fire, I was repulsed by the introduction of the The Man with a Beard but no Hair and The Woman with Hair but no Beard who used Veiled Facial Disguises, Various Finery Disguises, and Voice Fakery Disguises to distinguish themselves or would it be ˜undistinguish ? However, I am sure that those who have read Snicket's stomach-turning story of the Mortmain Mountains and what the Baudelaires did there would agree that the tale is full with well read and reliable people and as well as those people who are less well read and reliable. As the book turns away from the Mortmain Mountains and into the Stricken Stream, the newly reunited Baudelaires drift towards their next unfortunate event and (with any luck) the resolution of the V.F.D. crisis. Nevertheless, the story will only be published if Lemony Snicket is able to stay away from the prisons that he has become so fond of and writes down the miserable accounts of the Baudelaire children for our morbid enjoyment. With all due respect, Sasha James
Date published: 2005-07-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...an amazing story... For anyone who likes books of adventure, unrevealed secrets, intrigue, and sugar bowls, The Slippery Slope will easily make its way to your favourites list. The story starts with the two elder Baudelaires, hurtling down the slopes of the Mortmain Mountains. Once they find a way out of this calamity, they embark on a search for their sister, and the VFD headquarters. While doing so, they encounter many mysteries, dangerous situations, and people they're glad to meet (e.g. Quigley, a Quagmire triplet, and Sunny Baudelaire). Finally, after researching, planning, and going through many adventurous times, they learn enough about VFD and the schism that occurred in it, to get Sunny back and escape Count Olaf yet again. The book ends with the Baudelaires on their way to the last safe place, but split from their friend Quigley. Another unfortunate ending. It reminded me of the similar (sad) endings in other books from this truly unique series. Somehow, I disliked the ending of this book probably because it made me cry. I would've liked the ending, no matter how miserably unfortunate it was, if only Quigley Quagmire was still with the Baudelaires. Quigley was a memorable character, (with quite a few similarities to me) and he was one of the few well-learned people the Baudelaires came across. Another horrible fact was that his separation from them meant he was alone. At the ending, I felt like shouting indignantly at Mr.Snicket: No, not Quigley! Don't take Quigley away! But of course, that wouldn't have changed the sorrowful ending of the story, no matter how much I wanted to do so. The Slippery Slope is an amazing story of companionship, bravery, great adventures, doing the right thing, and pyromaniac villains scheming to steal fortunes. Violet, Klaus, and Sunny Baudelaire are talented, interesting, good-hearted children. Unfortunately, they are the victims of several evil plots. If you thought Mr.Snicket was joking about dropping this depressing book down a deep pit, think again. However: eventhough this book may bring one to tears, while hiding under the blankets of their bed, it's exceptionally wonderful. This is mostly because of Mr.Snicket's amazing writing skills. He has definitely set an example for all childrens writers. The story of Klaus and Violet's trials trying to locate their little sister, along with the VFD headquarters is desperately sad. Sunny's brilliant methods of trying to please not-so-brilliant villains in vain, is undoubtedly touching, and in some ways funny. I loved the way the story contained so many unpredicatable twists and turns. Sadly, they all led to the same unfortunate ending. After a while, one becomes as tied to the Baudelaires as Lemony Snicket is, and can't resist reading more about what fascinating (though disastrous) fate befalls them next.
Date published: 2005-07-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...slowly captivated... The Slippery Slope is a tragic yet entertaining story about three orphan children trying to survive in the new world that they have been subjected to. The story starts with Violet and Klaus (the two eldest orphans) crashing down a mountain in a circus trailer out of control. You slowly captivated by the tragic thoughts going through Violet and Klaus minds. In the novel when Violet and Klaus escape from the trailer you are overwhelmed with hope but then curious to what will happen next, well at least you are in my opinion. Next thing you know Violet, Klaus meet up with a group called snow scouts that are going up to the top of the mountain they are on. Violet and Klaus think this is just their luck. They can go up to the top and free their sister, Sunny; the evil Count Olaf has captured Sunny. When Lemony Snicket brings up Count Olaf anger and hates boils up inside of you but it slowly disperses because Count Olaf is one if those characters you love to hate. Violet and Klaus keep their faces hidden (because they are accused of a murder they never commited) and their hopes high as they travel up the mountain although their hopes aren't up to high because wherever they go a series of unfortunate events seems to follow. One day though as Violet Klaus and the rest of the group stops for the night a young boy around Violet's age comes to them and says he knows who they are and would like to help them. At this point you are totally shocked and surprised you are thinking to yourself who is this boy what does he want, you need not to wait. The boy tells them that his parents were part of this organization called V.F.D. Violet and Klaus are in awe for a short while there hard working parents were also in the organization called V.F.D and they have been trying for the longest time trying to figure out what it was and what it stood for. The boy takes them on this path that takes them to V.F.D headquarters. All of them share glances of anxiety and joy, they think could this be it the answer to all their questions. Violet cracks the code to the headquarters they slowly walk in and a huge amount of disappointment hits them. They should have known the headquarters has been burnt to the ground (I thought that was one of the best parts). Disappointment and pity was what this writer felt. The boy with them was also disappointed he told Violet and Klaus he was hoping to find his siblings, the Quagmires. Violet says with excitement to the boy that she knows the Quagmires and they are alive and well living in a hot air balloon away from danger. The boy is full of joy yet sad. My grief went out to him. Although the headquarters was burnt down and it felt they had nothing left to do Violet and Klaus realized they still had to go and save their younger sister Sunny. They boy, Quigley Quagmire help Violet climb to the top of the slope and save Sunny. When Sunny sees Violet her heart is full of joy they actually lived through that challenge Count Olaf put her in. This part of the book was a memorable. When they got Sunny down from the mountain, (Mortmain mountains) a tragic flood takes place separating Quigley and the orphans. Wonder what will happen read the book and find out.
Date published: 2005-07-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...breathtaking adventure... The Slippery Slope, the 10th book of A Series of Unfortunate Events, was a very enjoyable read. Lemony Snicket's unique writing style keeps you turning every suspenseful page as you follow Violet, Klaus and Sunny Baudelaire on another breathtaking adventure. After a terrible fire destroys their home and kills their parents, the older Baudelaire orphans, Violet and Klaus, find themselves in a caravan pulled behind a car full of horrible villains. These villains all follow the evil Count Olaf (who has been chasing the Baudelaire fortune since the fire) and his girlfriend Esme Squalor. They also have Sunny Baudelaire and intend to keep only her alive out of the Baudelaire family. Count Olaf sees through the orphans' excellent disguises as carnival freaks and cuts the knot tying the caravan to the car. The criminals assume that Violet and Klaus are dead, however Violet uses her inventing skills to stop the caravan from tumbling to the bottom of the Mortmain Mountains and the Stricken Stream. This marks the beginning of a perilous adventure during which the elder Baudelaires run into an old nemesis Carmelita Spats, and find the burned headquarters of the mysterious organization of V.F.D. This is done with the help of Quigley Quagmire, brother and final triplet of their missing friends Isadora and Duncan, whom everyone had presumed to be dead. The new friends and Sunny use their combined researching, inventing, cooking, spying and journalistic skills to find the last safe place for V.F.D. members to gather. However, this being an unfortunate tale, they are not successful in saving the Snow Scouts (including Carmelita Spats) from Count Olaf and end up floating down separate branches of the Stricken Stream.Violet, Klaus and Sunny watch sadly as their friend Quigley is swept away. Although this may sound like a depressing story, Snicket manages to keep it light and funny. He weaves himself and his friends into the story. I admire this cleverness in a book. The Slippery Slope is definitely unique. Except for other books in the series, I doubt that there is another book that has a storyline remotely like this one. The creativity of Snicket's writing makes The Slippery Slope a great deal of fun to read. This book will appeal to a wide variety of people including those who enjoy adventure, emotion and humour. At the end of the story I found myself wanting to know what happens in the next book. However, the letter to the editor does give a bit of a hint. The thing I would change in this book is to add the full title of the next book in this letter to the editor. I feel that there is a great deal of emotion behind the adventure in this book. It is a story of family and friends sticking together even in times of crisis. I believe that The Slippery Slope is a great addition to what is turning out to be a fabulous series!
Date published: 2005-07-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...typical wit and strange humor... The Slippery Slope is the tenth book in the A Series of Unfortunate Events series by Lemony Snicket. It follows the adventures of the three Baudelaire orphans, Violet, Klaus, and Sunny, who are being pursued for their fortune by the greedy Count Olaf and his evil companions. This book picks up where the last one left off, with the baby girl, Sunny, kidnapped by Olaf and riding up a mountain in his car. Violet and Klaus, meanwhile, are left hurtling down a slope in a caravan, meant by Olaf to fall off a cliff and die. While the two orphans manage to escape this fate, they encounter many other obstacles in their attempts to rescue Sunny and determine the secrets of VFD. They are helped by Quigley Quagmire, one of the Quagmire triplets who was presumed dead by the other two triplets after a fire destroyed their house. With the aid of Quigley, the Baudelaires reach the headquarters of VFD, but are unable to determine anything from them because the headquarters have been burned to the ground. They do, however, learn that VFD is having a meeting in a secret location thanks to a secret message left in Verbal Fridge Dialogue. Meanwhile, Sunny is being held hostage by Count Olaf, and is also being forced to cook and perform menial labour for him. Despite how ridiculous it is for a baby to be doing such things as setting up tents, she manages to perform and exceed at these tasks. When Violet and Quigley attempt to rescue her, she decides to stay and try to learn about Olaf's evil plans. The Baudelaires and Quigley then attempt to trap Olaf's girlfriend but decide not to at the last moment, and instead drag her up the mountain in her toboggan and confront Olaf themselves. Sunny, Violet, Klaus, and Quigley escape on the toboggan, but are separated when it breaks, and Quigley is carried down a different stream than the three other orphans. He promises, however, to meet them in the last safe meeting place of VFD. This is especially difficult for Violet because she has become quite close with Quigley. Hopefully, the four will manage to meet again in a future book. Lemony Snicket relays this journey with his typical wit and strange humor. He does this by making things seem so ridiculous that they are, in fact, quite funny. An excellent example is Sunny's abduction and slave labour. It is impossible for a baby to vacuum a car clean by blowing on chip pieces, but Olaf and his companions do not seem to think so, and Sunny manages to do this. I enjoyed this book, and I advise those who like the series to read it. If you have not read the previous books, I would suggest that you read them before this one, though it is not necessary.
Date published: 2005-07-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...amazing book... join the baudelaire orphans on their perilous journey accross the north while trying to get rid of their kidnappers. confused? i don't blame you. fair enough, i'll tell you the whole story. the baudelaires parents perished in a fire that burned their house to the ground. mr. poe a forgetfull (and sadly not much helpfull) man takes them to their relatives. but the evil count olaf will do anything to get his greedy hands on their large fourtune that violet will inheiret when she is of age. who violet? well i'll tell you... violet is the eldest baudelaire orphan and enjoys mechanics and making mechanical things more than anything in the world. klaus the middle child (and only boy) enjoys reading and understands words that most children have not even heard of. last but not least comes sunny, the baby of the baby of the family. this infant likes to bite things with her sharp teeth. being framed of murder and other crimes does not improve the scenario. only but two friends belive them and are loyal. are the quagmire triplets. but only two of them are left. isadora the poet and duncan the reporter. their parents were killed in a terrible fire. and their other triplet,quigley, was also killed in the fire. or so they think. count olaf is after their blood too, since the quagmires inheiret the family fourntune of sapphires. accross the winterland, treacherous obstacles lie. they must escape count olaf and his greedy girlfriend esme along with their helpers who have taken sunny captive and they meet some familiar charectars, along with a mysterious boy who knows what vfd stands for. vfd are the three lettres that isadora and duncan shouted to them right before they went captive into olafs clutches.......... and amazing book for everybody that needs a change.
Date published: 2005-07-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...a page turner... The Slippery Slope started when two of the Baudelaire orphans, Klaus and Violet, were in the caravan which was barreling down a steep mountain road. They managed to get out of the rampaging caravan before it fell off a cliff. When they where climbing up the mountain to find their baby sister they saw a bunch of snow gnats and snow gnats sting people just for fun. They went into a cave to start a fire because snow gnats hate fire. When they went into the cave there was already a fire and there where a bunch of people called The Snow Scouts and there was a mysterious person in a sweater who knew about V.F.D. I thought that the book was a page turner, it's very interesting. I liked how Lemony Snicket writes his books and how he uses the last thoughts you would think about. I disliked how the book is sad also that, Count Olaf always gets away and that he is a crazy murderous man who always burns down rich peoples houses just for fortunes. This is what how my new ending would go. Quigley, Klaus and Violet found the sugar bowl and they traded it for the Snicket file and Sunny. then they go off with the sugar bowl, Sunny and the Snicket file. I felt that the book was too sad, a bit funny, lots of scary times where Violet and Klaus almost die then they get away, and the book surprises me a lot. I relate to Klaus because I like to read and I like adventures. I think this book would appeal to people who like to do lots of adventures, who like to get scared a lot, who like to invent and who like action and adventure books. I think this book would not appeal to people, who sit on the couch and eat all day, who hate to have their baby sister taken by mean Count Olaf and people who hate action and adventure books. I would change the part about how Carmelita Spats went with Count Olaf and Esme Squalor so that she would run away and save Bruce and the rest of the people who got caught in the net and catch Count Olaf. The book did not remind me of any author, movie, book or TV show because all the TV shows, movies and books I read or saw are not as good as this book. I would recommend this book to all of my friends.
Date published: 2005-07-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...a thrilling, funny book... A Series of Unfortunate Events' tenth chapter, The Slippery Slope, is the best one yet! Lemony Snicket describes it as distressing, repulsive and unpleasant but isn't that what keeps us all reading on?!?! This is definitely a thrilling, funny book. Lemony Snicket's style of writing and the way he actually puts himself into the story keeps you hooked until the very end!!! His witty and hilarious definitions, along with his constant urging to Put down the book and back away!!! make you ask, What next? Just when you think you reached the high point of the story, there's another big twist! Because of this, you want to keep reading!!! The trouble starts with Violet and Klaus Baudelaire in a difficult situation, heading down the Mortmain Mountains in a caravan at full speed while their sister Sunny is in Olaf's clutches.but we all know that if anyone can find a way out of it, Violet and Klaus can. This time they do it with a drag chute brake. Before we know it they have dealt with snow gnats, a whole group of Snow Scouts and the horrible Carmelita Spats! They decide to take their chances and follow a mysterious sweatered scout up the Vertical Flame Diversion (yes another V.F.D. mystery!!) only to find out he's Quigley Quagmire, the brother of their good friends Duncan and Isadora, who was thought to be dead!!!! This book is definitely full of surprises!!!! The new threesome break through the Vernacularly Fastened Door and find that the V.F.D. Headquarters had been burned to ashes, along with most of the hope they had of solving the many mysteries surrounding them. Still, though, they continue on and with Violet's inventions, Klaus' research and Quigley's maps they manage to find and rescue Sunny from the top of the Stricken Stream waterfall where Count Olaf had her in charge of all the cooking and cleaning!!!! They find out that there is one last safe place where the V.F.D. volunteers can gather, and so decide to set off for it but of course that would be too simple of an ending for a Lemony Snicket book, so we get one more final twist. On their way, the Baudelaires are flung into the Stricken Stream and split up from Quigley. Hopefully, as a poem I once read said, “Even the weariest river, winds somewhere safe to sea, although to find out we'll have to wait for the next chapter in the series. The reason I love this book so much is because of its originality and because it's unlike any book that I have ever read in my life!! Usually I prefer serious, non-fiction books over books that make you laugh out loud they're so funny!!!! Well, that's the type of book this is, and even if you don't usually like it, try it, try something new!!!! The truth is I loved every part of this book and disliked nothing!!!! Trust me, you'll love it too!!!!
Date published: 2005-07-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...shocking and suspenseful... The book The Slippery Slope is about three children named the Baudelaires that are seperated when their enemy Count Olaf had already kidnapped their baby sister meanwhile the two older siblings were about to meet their doom when they make a device that makes the cart slow down so that they could be safe. The two siblings then try to find their baby sister and go through all sorts of clues and adventures. They also try to find some more clues about V.F.D when they run into some friends of theirs that go along with them to help. They then get to go to the actual V.F.D to find that it is all burnt up by some strangers that meet up with Count Olaf and his gang. The Baudelaires and their friends then meet up with Count Olaf and finally get their baby sister back and fall down a waterfall and then that is where that book ends off. I thoght that the book was very fun to read and was sometimes shocking and suspenseful. What I liked about the book was that it was very suprising and you just never wanted to put it down unless you really had to. What I disliked about the book was that they keep on running into the same bad things and people instead of different. I liked the ending just the way it was because you know that there is going to be another book. So I wouldn't change the ending at all. I think that I related to Claus the most because he really likes to read a lot and has glasses just like me but I don't have any siblings. I honestly think that this book would appeal to readers that like shockings and mystery and fun things to read in a book. If I could change one thing about the book it would be that they find out that both of their parents are still alive and that is all. I actually thought that there would be a movie about this and there is going to be one! It reminds of no movies or books at all.
Date published: 2005-07-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...very good book... The review of the slippery slope [Warning this book is very depressing] The Slippery Slope is the 10th book of a series of unfortunate events and one of Lemony Snicket's best books yet, and the illustrations by Bret Helquist are fantastic.The story begins with Klaus and Violet rolling down a mountain in a caravan and Sunny the baby of the family kidnapped by the evil Count Olaf going to the top of the mountain.Later in the book there are several more miserable events like a terrible fire and coming across Carmelita Spats. If you are interested in reading this book I would advise you to read books 1 to 9 of the series of unfortunate events before this one. This is the perfect book for kids from 10 to 13 years of age; however, it is still a very good book for adult and teenagers The first page even has a place to write your name so you don't have to worry about losing it, hopefully it will be returned to you should you misplace it. Unfortunately, this book is a little more expensive (it's 16.99$). About the author: I would like to write about Lemony Snicket but I am sorry to say that it is almost impossible to find any information about this author.
Date published: 2005-07-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...wonderfully dreadful... This book was written by one of the strangest authors - Lemony Snicket. This author says there is nothing to be found in these pages but misery, despair, and discomfort and The Slippery Slope is no exception . This wonderfully dreadful book is about the three Baudelaire orphans, Sunny, Klaus and Violet, Count Olaf and his gang, VFD, and the Baudelaire friends, the Quagmires. In the beginning of the book, Violet and Klaus save themselves from plunging into a deep ravine to their death. Meanwhile, Sunny is taken to the VFD headquarters high in the mountains. Violet and Klaus head up the mountain seeking their sister and the headquarters. They find the headquarters and Sunny on top of the mountain. With the help of their friends, the Quagmires, they learn more information about the evil Count Olaf and the VFD, and about their parents. This is an adventure story that will make you wonder what will happen next. This book is great for people ten and up who love detail and unusual books. I think that this was the best in the series so far. I enjoyed this book and many others will too.
Date published: 2005-07-11
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ...very suspenseful... It was a pretty good book but very negative. I liked it because Count Olaf did a very good job of being evil and trying to make The Bauldelaires life miserable. I also liked it because The Bauldelaire kids always tried to make the situation better and try to get out. It was also very good because Count Olaf had so many disguises and they were all very tricky. Some of the parts could get boring because it wasn't going fast enough and moving on fast enough but it was a great book. It is very suspenseful too! I like the ending because you don't know what will happen next. I could relate to Sunny and Violet because Violet always tried new plans to get out and Sunny always bit Count Olaf and I would do those things too. I think this book will appeal to people that like to try new plans to escape, people that like to escape and use their minds to devise plans. This book is mostly adventure and a little mystery. The adventures they go through make me want to read more and find out what happens. I wouldn't change anything about this book, it is great! The adventures the children go through are so unbelievable! If you haven't read this book, you should try it and see if you like it!
Date published: 2005-07-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...unexpected twists and turns! Oh no! Violet and Klaus Baudelaire are hurtling down the Mortmain Mountains in a caravan! Oh good, Violet's invented something to stop them from falling off Mount Fraught. That's The Slippery Slope for you, full of unexpected twists and turns! Admittedly it's not a very happy book, so I think people who have something really horrible going on in their lives would like it. It's kind of like the book is giving them sympathy. (I couldn't think of any other way to describe it). Really horrible things happen to the Baudelaire's in this book. What kind of horrible things? Well, I think now would be a good time to include a summary of what happened in the book. The book starts with Violet and Klaus hurtling down the Mortmain Mountains in a caravan. Thinking quickly, Violet invents a device to stop them falling off Mount Fraught. (Sunny Baudelaire is trapped in Count Olaf's car which is driving up the Mortmain Mountains.) Unfortunately the caravan did not survive, and the two eldest Baudelaire's were forced to walk up the Mortmain Mountains to rescue their sister. When they stop to rest in one of the caves, who do they meet but Quigley Quagmire! Quigley knows where the headquarters for the V.F.D. is and invites them to come find it with him. But when they get there, the whole place is burned down! Just when they are about to despair, the children spot a flume of green smoke at the top of the frozen waterfall, the V.F.D. signal. Violet and Quigley decide to climb up the waterfall and see who is signaling. They climb up and find Sunny cooking salmon! (Count Olaf made her do the cooking for him and his troupe - even though Sunny's only a baby). So to make a long story short (which is what I've been trying to do all along), the two eldest Baudelaire's and Quigley climb up the waterfall and rescue Sunny. But when they try and get back down, the ice breaks and Quigley is swept down one part of the stream at the bottom of the waterfall, and the Baudelaire's are swept down the other. And the summary part of this review ends in a very incomplete way, just like the real book. What I liked most about the book was the beginning of each chapter. Lemony Snicket has a very interesting and knowledgeable way of opening each one. The thing I hated about it was the ending. It was too incomplete. It made me wish the next book was right there when I finished it (which it wasn't). If I were writing the book, I'd end it either when they came to the end of the stream or found Quigley, whichever one came first. So there you have it. The basic story and how I felt about it. I don't know if whoever is reading this has ever read The Slippery Slope, but if you haven't, you should. You'll find that there's so much more than the basic story.
Date published: 2005-07-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...please read the book... Three orphans, one kidnapped for their family fortune and the other two struggling to survive in a very cold climate hoping to reach their youngest sister and get her back from the evil kidnapping Count Olaf. This novel concludes with them rescuing their sibling and finding a friend but also landing in the cold and ash filled Stricken stream and once again losing their friend. To find out more about The Slippery Slopes please read the book. I hope you enjoy it as much as I did. My thoughts about the story: I liked the Slippery Slope because it wasn't some girly-girl book about a princess losing her crown. It was action packed and made you want to eat supper reading. I didn't really like how it was secretive about the sugar bowl to the end. How I and other people might relate to the characters in The Slippery Slope I would have most likely related to Klaus for I really like to read But other people might relate to all of the Baudelaires because of their hardships being orphans.
Date published: 2005-07-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from I enjoyed this book... Lemony Snicket does it again! A Series of Unfortunate Events are books that manage to be suspenseful and filled with odd twists and turns. Through all ten books, the evil Count Olaf hunts down the Beaudelaire children for their money. As the series unfolds, we discover that someone previously thought dead is alive. As always, we get our hopes up for the Beaudelaires but good news is never what we expected. I enjoyed this book because I got more clues to solve the mysteries that surround the children. As with all the other books in this series, the ending leads us to the next book. Klaus makes me think of myself. Like him, I like to read and I have solved problems through research. For example, I have read books about hamsters and that has helped me understand my pet Coco's behavior. Standing on her hind legs means I have to make the first move. Who knew! Readers who enjoy suspense, bad puns and lots of adventures will not be able to put this book down!
Date published: 2005-07-11
Rated 1 out of 5 by from ...Recycle it... I'm not to fond of Lemony Snicket's books, especially this series. I had no real interest in it, and it bored me. This series is about 3 orphans. As I said, boring. The book is for the right person, and I know many of the right people, but I am not one of them. I detest this book. Recycle it.
Date published: 2005-07-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...I can't wait for the next... The Slippery Slope by Lemony Snicket is Book the Tenth in its series. The Series of Unfortunate Events has captivated readers since the Bad Beginning. In this book Violet and Klaus Baudelaire are following the evil Count Olaf up a treacherous mountain, trying to rescue their baby sister, Sunny, from Olaf's clutches. They also meet Quigley Quagmire, the third triplet of their friends Duncan and Isadora Quagmire, who, up until then, they thought was dead. They must rescue Sunny and escape to safely before it's too late. I know it sounds really confusing when I write it but Lemony Snicket has a way of making it make sense. His style of writing is unique, which is why I like it so much. It's a little confusing sometimes but also very detailed, with flair unlike any I have seen before. One thing I especially like about Mr, Snicket's writing is that he always stops to explain things in great detail, using specific, and usually very humourous examples. Some people find this highly annoying because these explanations go on for pages and by the time they are done you hardly remember what the point was in the first place. I agree that this is a tad confusing but gives you extra understanding of a situation, and might even make you chuckle a little, which never really hurt anyone, now did it? At the beginning of almost every single one of Lemony Snicket's book he warns readers that the book is horrible and sad and not worth reading in the slightest. Some people I have talked to say that that's really not very smart since people will pick that book up at a bookstore and read that first page or two, and put it back on the shelf. I think differently. Most people today will read the book just to see what is so bad about it. It sounds kind of dumb but I think it's true, or at least to a certain extent. The three Baudelaire orphans are the main characters of the book. They are probably some of the most troubled children ever to be born. Their problems started when their parents were killed in a tragic fire and escalated ever since. If I were one of the Baudelaires I'm sure I would have gone crazy long ago. They always seem to cope with their problems all right and even find ways to make it better. I know they are just fictional characters but it's a message to all of us that we have to cope because they are managing and their problems are probably a lot worse. Well, for most of us that is. Lastly, I would like to impress that I thought that this book was really good. I would have thought that after writing ten books on the same topic Lemony Snicket would have passed his peak but he just keeps going strong. All I can say is that I can't wait for the next book!!
Date published: 2005-07-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...totally unique... Could you survive a drastic fire, being captured by your arch enemy and foil a plot to steal the family fortune? I know I couldn't! That is exactly what the Baudelaire orphans have been doing in the first nine books of this series, and right now they are having another of their infamous catastrophies. Sunny, the baby sister, has been kidnapped by Count Olaf (a terrible villain who is trying to steal the family fortune) and VIolet and Klaus, the older brother and sister, are spinning out of control, backwards down Mortmain Mountain, in a caravan, compliments of Count Olaf. As every second goes by, the siblings are getting further and further apart. But Violet's and Klaus' immediate problem is to try to stop the caravan before it goes careening over the cliff. They succeed, thanks to Violet's inventive thinking using a drag chute and a sticky concoction (which I found really gross) they made from things they found in the cupboards. Next, they have to rescue Sunny and they can't ask for help because they have been framed for a murder committed by Count Olaf himself. After treking around for some time they hapen to run into a Scout group and who happens to be in it but an orphan they thought was dead - Quigley Quagmire!! The orphans work together and climb to the top of the mountain and to their amazement - and mine - they find the headquarters of V.F.D., the organization for which their parents worked. The old building is charred and ruined but they find pieces of their past and put them together. The three manage to rescue Sunny and get away from Count Olaf, but misfortune befalls the Bauderlaire's again as Quigley falls over the waterfall next to the headquarters. But they know not to worry because they are sure their paths will cross again. This book was amazing, but the Baudelaire's have lost friends again and the pieces to the puzzle that would lead them back to their parents. Now we just have to wait for the next part of Lemony Snicket's tragic tale of the Baudelaire's. This book was great and I would recommend it to anybody who loves adventure and books that they just can't put down, but to really appreciate what the orphans have gone through, I would recommend that you read the other nine books first. One of the things that I really liked about this book is that they all end with a clue about what will happen in the next one. This book reminds me of no other book. It is totally unique and I wouldn't change one thing! On a scale of one to ten it is definitely a ten for me. Hats off to Lemony Snicket for a great book. Way to go!!
Date published: 2005-07-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from I loved this book! In order to steal the Bauldelaire family fortune, Count Olaf has kidnapped Sunny Bauldelaire, leaving only her older siblings to rescue her. Violet, Klaus (her older siblings) and Sunny endure horrid hardships and obstacles while searching for each other. In the end, Violet and Klaus rescue Sunny and narrowly escape, not knowing they're on their way to safety. I loved this book! The parts I liked best were when Quigley showed himself, when he was presumed dead, and when they figured out the food in the refrigerator told them where to go for safety. It's so unique, and that's why I like it. The only thing that I disliked was that there wasn't much romance between Violet and Quigley, and the author cut out the only part where there was any. It may have made it more interesting, to some, if he kept it. A good ending to replace the current one would be if two of the siblings got away, but one got captured while fleeing. Or, Violet or Klaus had to trade themselves in for Sunny. Although, these endings may not fit in with what will happen in the next book(s). I can relate to Klaus, Violet and their choice. Their choice was to help and rescue Sunny, and I (having 5 sisters myself) would do the same. I can relate to Violet. This is because I love to invent things. I invent al kinds of things, from recipes to games, to gadgets to make life easier. Who knows? Maybe one day, I'll be the next Elbert Einstein or Rube Goldberg! I can relate to Klaus because I am a bookworm, I will read any material and learn a lot because of it. This book will appeal to ages eight and up. Even though it will appeal to them, I think it will be difficult to read to themselves. I suggest ages eleven and up as a good age to read to oneself. It would appeal to anyone who likes the genre of mystery and adventure. The Slippery Slope has the genre of adventure because Klaus and Violet journey to find their sister. It has the genre of mystery because they all have questions that need to be answered and answers that lead to more questions. It is a wonderful book, with a few laughs and is great to escape into for a while. This book doesn't remind me of any shows or movies. It reminds me of the book, The Thief Lord. In both stories, both sets of children are orphans leading unhappy lives with relatives. The Bauldelaires were framed for murder and must live alone in hiding without being caught. The kids, from The Thief Lord, ran away and must now live in hiding and run from the police, or have the consequence of going home. This is a little like Harry Potter because Harry is an orphan, leading an unhappy life with his relatives and is always trying to not get caught and avoid trouble.
Date published: 2005-07-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...I like this book... Even though this book doesn't have a happy ending-and I love happy endings-I like this book anyway.It has drama, mystery, adventure, horror, suspense and comedy in it. The illustrations in this book are very neat because they are detailed and they look exacly how I picture them. Violet, Klaus and Sunny Baudelaire are charming children, but ever since the fire that killed their parents, they have been unlucky. A man named Count Olaf wants to get his filthy hands on the fortune that the Baudelaires will inherit when they come of age. Count Olaf decided to kidnap Sunny (he only needed one of the Baudelaires to steal the fortune) in his car and went up the Mortmain Mountains where a secret organization called V.F.D. (no one is quite sure what V.F.D. stands for) is supposed to be gathering. Olaf wants to get there so he can destroy the organization, because one of the Baudelaire parents is supposed to be alive and works for V.F.D..If one of the parents is alive, he or she will ruin his plans. Olaf thought that he had killed the other two siblings, but Violet invented something to save them. So Violet and Klaus set off on a journey to find their parents and Sunny. Will they win this time? Or will they lose?
Date published: 2005-07-11
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...a remarkable book... Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events The Slippery Slope was a remarkable book to read this summer. It takes the reader on an Unfortunate Ride that doesn't stop till the very end. In the beginning of this book we find Violet and Klaus endangering their lives but thanks to Violet's inventive mind they survive. They meet Quigley Quagmire and save Sunny from Count Olaf, escape his clutches and that's the end of their lucky streak. The tables turn and they get stuck in the river. Now they lose Quigley and are surrounded in mysteries. I think this is the best and worst hour for the Baudaliare Orphans. At least they have each other! The question I don't get is if V.F.D is truly the Volunteer Fire Department then why couldn't they save the headquarters? If I could change one thing about the book I'd change how unfortunate the book is. And if I could change the ending I would have it be happy. The thing that really bugs me is telling Esme about the trap. First they waste a night digging a hole when they could have researched about V.F.D. Secondly, the people in the area they're in thinks they're fugitives and murderers so why not take Esme prisoner? Someone will always think they are murderers anyways so they'll never have any luck in the courtroom. Even if they're saved Mr. Poe will never believe them. I thought they were supposed to be smart. But then again that's what makes kids love these books! They want to see if they smarten up. It really worked! Im praising this book because it is so interesting! Literature is much more than a bunch of words. The Best part I think is when they decode the Verbal Fridge Dialogue message. They act Smart! I only noticed that now! These books have such a big impact on you when you're reading them. You start to get scared! I know I did! I gave up a beautiful summer day to read this book because I couldn't put it down. I don't regret that! These books stretch the mystery genre by adding a mystery of the author, is he real or not? The story follows the formula the author always uses but it's always a different story.This means that the story is comparable to some of my favourite books such as Harry Potter, Artemis Fowl, The Wish List, Holes, and Eragon. If the author for some reason is reading this I have another suggestion: make the books bigger! The books in this particular series appeal to me because of the mystery feel. I can't wait for the upcoming movie and the next book The Grim Grotto! Know I get to start reading Lemony Snicket's unauthorized autobiography in fact I think ill go start it Know! I want to Know more about the author! Keep on reading and have a great summer! From hopefully your future Junior Booklover, Michael Stewart
Date published: 2005-07-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...amazing series... The tenth book of the series, A Series of Unfortunate Events, The Slippery Slope, is about the continual unfortunate happenings in three childrens' lives. Lemony Snicket is a great author and it is really interesting how he defines the more difficult sentences in his book by saying a phrase which here means... and then writes the definition. In this novel Sunny Baudelaire is separated from her older siblings and is driven to a secret headquarters on top of a freezing mountain. She is trapped with a carload of villains who are trying to steal the childrens' giant fortune left behind by their parents who perished in a terrible fire. Violet and Klaus, Sunny's older brother and sister, try to search for their infant sister. I think Sunny is an important character and I like her personality. She is very intelligent because not as many infants have such a large knowledge of words and, even though Sunny has not learned to speak them yet, she creates a language of her own. I think Snicket is an awesome author and that he should continue writing his amazing series about well-read Klaus, invention-making Violet, and sharp-toothed Sunny. I have also read and enjoyed the other nine novels in this series and have also read the Letters to the Editor in the back of each one. I especially enjoy reading those letters because in every one something is different with the printing. For example, he sometimes uses telegrams to get his message across, the writing is messy because the paper was soaking wet when he wrote on it, or a dog has chewed up the paper. As well Snicket reveals the title of his next novel in these letters which I think is a clever way to get you to want to read it. All of Lemony Snicket's novels in this series are great for all young people who are just looking for a good read and who love something different once in a while.
Date published: 2005-07-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...a perfect mixture... The Slippery Slope is a witty book that will keep you on the edge of your seat as you travel with Violet, Klaus, and their new found friend, Quigley as they journey up perilous mountains and down frozen waterfalls. Meanwhile, they have to outwil a villianous con artist and his girlfriend, rescue their younger sister Sunny, two other siblings, a mysterious file, a lost head-quarter and a possible survivor of a tragic fire. As is with many good books, I couldn't put it down till it was finished, even after it was finished it was hard to put it down. I'd give The Slippery Slope four and a half stars because pretty much my only complaint was it wasn't long enough. I think this book will appeal to most kids ove the age of 10. Lemony Snicket combines comedy, adventure and suspense into a perfect mixture in the comical, hair-raising thriller book and should have its own genre.
Date published: 2005-07-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...outstanding... This enstallment in the series is by far Lemony Snicket's most outstanding piece of work. He truly went over the top this time. I would reccomend this book to anyone who loves suspence and would like a change in what they're reading. I with he makes an 11th one as I have heard there will be thriteen. I say if you haven't read them read them read the seris as soon as possible!
Date published: 2005-07-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...one of my favourite books... Whenever I read a book by Lemony Snicket , I never want to stop reading. I know that I'm probably not alone in thinking that way, because Lemony Snicket's books have become a hit, and are best sellers in North America. He has written a total of 10 books, which I've read. The most recent book I've read was the 10th, about a month after it came out and I never put it down unless I had to eat a meal, sleep or go to the bathroom, It was great! (And my parents didn't object because I was learning, not watching TV!) It was a perfect addition to the other books he's written that Ive loved as well. He writes in a very logical way and says mysterious things at different points on in the book. And for some weird reason, he never wants you to read books, because he seems to think they will put you into misery and make you weep. I'm not sure if that's true to some people but, all of the books he's written have given me entertainment, laughter and enjoyment. Perhaps he's only using reverse psychology, which in my case, worked. He writes a great tale about three orphans and their extreme case of bad luck and misfortune. The three orphans, named the Baudelaires were unlucky enough to be sent to the home of Count Olaf as their first guardian after their parents died in a fire. Count Olaf is or was a wretched man with only one eyebrow and a tattoo of an eye on his ankle, he has shiny eyes and a raspy voice that seems to follow the Baudelaires wherever they go or to whichever guardian they go. He once again ends this tale at a cliff-hanger that really leaves you wanting more. He also surprises you along the way, with twists and turns and other weird characters. The Slippery Slope was definitely a good book, it's one of my favourite books, I have 9 other favourite books, but I'm guessing you couldn't guess who wrote them. My last words or suggestion to you: You should read the book!
Date published: 2005-07-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from An outstanding novel... The Baudelaire orphans are back .The story continues where it left off as Violet and Klaus Baudelaire are hurtling to their deaths down a slippery slope. Violet and Klaus must find a way to find Count Olaf who has their little sister Sunny. Violet and Klaus must construct an invention in order to save themselves from an early demise at the bottom of the slippery slope. This book is filled with Violet's ingenious inventions and Klaus' vast vocabulary and knowledge. Along their way to save their little sister Klaus and Violet encounter many familiar names from their past including one they thought was dead. Violet and Klaus find out many details about their parents (one of whom they believe to be alive) and about the elusive organization called V.F.D on their quest for the Snicket file , which they believe to hold the answers to their questions. An outstanding novel by Lemony Snicket, who has yet again produced a classic novel with an amazing concoction of mystery and humor. Again the book ends in a cliffhanger. This book intellectually stimulates the children as well as gives an enjoyable read. Teaches children advanced new words and meanings without boring children. Amazing read for ages 10 and up. As a fellow book lover I recommend this book to everyone who loves an enjoyable read that makes you think.
Date published: 2005-07-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from The Slippery Slope I really like the book. It was very exciting. The Baudelaires still need to know what V.F.D stands for. They think it stands for Volunteer Fire Department, but I don't think it stands for that. I am still reading this book called: The Unauthorized Autobiography from Lemony Snicket. Why? because I want to know what V.F.d stands for. When there is not an exciting part then I stop reading for a while. Then when there is an exciting part, I keep on reading and reading for a very long time. I wish me and my sister were like Violets, Klaus and Sunny. We always fight,but I don't want to apart from my sister. I hope we willl be together forever,until we are 18 or 19 teen. I hope I could be has smart Violet, Klaus and Sunny. My favourite of the book is when they meet Quigley Quagmire. I thought the Baudelaries would find their parents. That was very disappionting. I hope they would find their parents in the next book. Out of all the books I really this one the best. I didn't know Esme Squalor wea that evil when I firstread about her. Carmelita Spats is one stupid girl. She is joining Count Olaf group. She thinks Count Olaf and Esme think she is a wonderful girl. She wouldn't even beleave what the Baudelairs and Quigley are say to her. Oh my gosh that is very sad. She is goind to be their slave. she doesn't know that, but she will soon find out. This book felt like a movie I watch or a book I have read. I don't really like the ending of the book because it is very frustrating.
Date published: 2005-07-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...an 8/10... The Slippery Slope the 10th installment in A Series of Unfortunate Events written by Lemony Snicket is most likely the best book written in the series. The book takes of from where we left, after reading the last book The Carnivorous Carnival , where the two elder Baudelaire's Klaus and Violet were fooled by Count Olaf and are now plummeting down a slippery slope in their trailer, while Olaf has their younger sister Sunny as collateral to get at the Baudelaire fortune. The book begins with the two Baudelaire's trying to figure out a way to get out or stop the trailer before they plummet to their demise and once accomplishing this, then begin their hunt to save Sunny from the clutches of Olaf as well as find the headquarters of V.F.D while facing many obstacles throughout the way. These two begin a long and strenuous journey into the dark, cold mountains to find the whereabouts of their sister and V.F.D headquarters which would help them get answers to a lot of their unanswered questions and maybe find out the whereabouts of one of their parents who survived the fire. Throughout this journey they meet a few old faces and some new interesting ones; especially one of them who they thought was lost forever. The book was very well written; Lemony Snicket continued with his negative way of writing which takes these books to another dimension, this is something that makes his writing unique from most of the other authors out there. You can relate this book to Hit and Run in the way that in both books the kids in the books keep moving to new houses because of certain mishaps which occur in each of the houses they lived in. You can relate Klaus to someone like Hermione Granger from Harry Potter as they're both really smart and come up with solutions when they're really needed, Violet is more like Alfred in the book Alfred the Inventor as they're both great inventors, whose inventions always come in handy during tough situations and Sunny is more like Maggie from the hit T.V show, The Simpsons as both of them look incapable of doing anything but when there is danger afoot they'll come to the rescue. This book would appeal to an older class of kids from the age 11-16 because younger kids probably won't like some of the things in the book, it might scare them a little. This book is an adventure book with a lot of twists and turns throughout. Overall I would rate this book an 8/10 as these books are interesting but the only thing that was a little sad was the ending which could have been a little better, as the whole plot was very interesting but closer to the end it could be a little struggle to continue on. The ending should have a bit more spunk, otherwise this book was very well written.
Date published: 2005-07-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...very well written... The Slippery Slope the 10th installment in A Series of Unfortunate Events written by Lemony Snicket is most likely the best book written in the series. The book takes of from where we left, after reading the last book The Carnivorous Carnival , where the two elder Baudelaire's Klaus and Violet were fooled by Count Olaf and are now plummeting down a slippery slope in their trailer, while Olaf has their younger sister Sunny as collateral to get at the Baudelaire fortune. The book begins with the two Baudelaires trying to figure out a way to get out or stop the trailer before they plummet to their demise and once accomplishing this, then begin their hunt to save Sunny from the clutches of Olaf as well as find the headquarters of V.F.D while facing many obstacles throughout the way. These two begin a long and strenuous journey into the dark, cold mountains to find the whereabouts of their sister and V.F.D headquarters which would help them get answers to a lot of their unanswered questions and maybe find out the whereabouts of one of their parents who survived the fire. Throughout this journey they meet a few old faces and some new interesting ones; especially one of them who they thought was lost forever. The book was very well written; Lemony Snicket continued with his negative way of writing which takes these books to another dimension, this is something that makes his writing unique from most of the other authors out there. You can relate this book to Hit and Run in the way that in both books the kids in the books keep moving to new houses because of certain mishaps which occur in each of the houses they lived in. You can relate Klaus to someone like Hermione Granger from Harry Potter as they're both really smart and come up with solutions when they're really needed, Violet is more like Alfred in the book Alfred the Inventor as they're both great inventors, whose inventions always come in handy during tough situations and Sunny is more like Maggie from the hit T.V show, The Simpsons as both of them look incapable of doing anything but when there is danger afoot they'll come to the rescue. This book would appeal to an older class of kids from the age 11-16 because younger kids probably won't like some of the things in the book, it might scare them a little. This book is an adventure book with a lot of twists and turns throughout. Overall I would rate this book an 8/10 as these books are interesting but the only thing that was a little sad was the ending which could have been a little better, as the whole plot was very interesting but closer to the end it could be a little struggle to continue on. The ending should have a bit more spunk, otherwise this book was very well written.
Date published: 2005-07-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...an interesting book... Violet, Klaus and Sunny Baudelaire are 3 orphans who's parents were killed in a fire. The children always seem to run into misfortune, caused by Count Olaf, an evil man who is trying to steal the huge fortune left to the children when their parents died. The Baudelaires have moved from guardian to guardian, running away from Olaf, but he always hunts them down and disguises himself to trick the Baudelaire's guardians and try to kidnap the children so he can steal their fortune. In The Slippery Slope, the 10th of 13 books in the Series of Unfortunate Events, Sunny, the youngest Baudelaire, who is about the size of a watermelon, is kidnapped by Count Olaf. Violet and Klaus try to rescue their sister and along the way they meet Quigley Quagmire. Quigley is one of the Quagmire triplets, and he was believed to have perished in a terrible fire that also killed his parents. Count Olaf is also chasing Isadora and Duncan, the other two triplets, to steal their fortune as well as the Baudelaires'. Quigley agreed to help the older Baudelaires find Sunny, so they climbed the Slippery Slope up the Mortmain Mountains to rescue her. This is an interesting book for someone who enjoys tragedy or mystery. I think the book would be better if the author wouldn't explain words and expressions so often, for example, facinorous, which is a fancy word for 'wicked'. Sometimes, Lemony Snicket will use up to a whole page explaining a word. The author is good at making you wonder about things. A thought I have is, Was it Olaf who started the fires that killed the Baudelaire and Quagmire parents? Something awful always happens, although you never know exactly what is going to happen next!
Date published: 2005-07-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...the best book so far... I think that the Baudelaire Series are extremely good books. They're about three children, Violet, Klaus, and Sunny Baudelaire. Their parents died in a fire, so they have to go from home to home with a different guardian every time because their guardians either die or don' want them. An evil man and his comrades are following them wherever they go. I think that the tenth book in A Series of Unfortunate Events is the best book so far. It's really neat to learn about the V.F.D.; it's a lot of different things. You have to read the tenth book to find out about it. I don't have a favorite character; I think all of the Baudelaires are very intelligent. Violet, the oldest Baudelaire, age fourteen is an extremely good inventor. People who know her well know that when she puts her hair up in a ribbon she's thinking of an invention. Klaus, the middle Baudelaire, age twelve is an extremely good reader and researcher. He could probably look up something for you in just a couple minutes. Sunny, the youngest Buadelaire, age two, is small for her age, but an extremely good cook, before her mother died Sunny used to help her mother cook, and make meals. People who know her well know what she's saying when she talks, but people who don't know her just think she's talking baby talk. Count Olaf, the evil man who always follows the children around with his comrades, is trying to steal the Baudelaire fortune that Baudelaire parents left them. The fortune is not to be used until Violet comes of age. Count Olaf's girlfriend is as evil as him. She only does things that are in, not out. In the tenth book, The Slippery Slope, Count Olaf steals Sunny and makes her his slave. Count Olaf, his comrades, and his girlfriend are going to burn down the V.F.D. head quarters. But two mysterious people come and say they already did. Violet, Klaus and the one who survived the fire save Sunny. Count Olaf, his comrades, his girlfriend, and the two mysterious people go to burn down the last safe place for the members of the V.F.D. The Baudelaire's have to get there before them or it may be too late. I think this is a really great book and series and other people should consider reading these very good books.
Date published: 2005-07-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...another great book... If you were on a runaway caravan with your younger brother, no brakes and a huge cliff racing nearer, what would you do? Violet Baudelaire has to answer that exact question when her and her brother's lives are put in jeopardy. The slippery slope is another great book by the mysterious author Lemony Snicket. Even though The Slippery Slope is the tenth book in the series you do not have to read the earlier nine to get clued in to the adventure and misfortune in this tenth book. Again featured, as the main characters are the Baudelaire Orphans, Violet, Klaus and baby Sunny. Also a main character is the evil Count Olaf who has yet another wild plan to steal the Baudelaire fortune. The two older Baudelaire siblings are trying to get their sister back from Count Olaf after he kidnapped her as part of his plan to steal their fortune. Violet and Klaus are looking for the elusive V.D.F. headquarters where they think one of their parents might have escaped to after the fire that killed the other one. They also meet the third Quagmire triplet who helps them in their quest. This is a very good book with witty comments from the author, an evil villain and a cast of very funny circus helpers. The characters have flash back memories and talk about their adventures from the first 9 books to help explain some things and after reading it you will never forget it. I thought it was an excellent book and, just like the other books in the series of unfortunate events, it stands in its own category and everyone should give it a try, they won't regret it.
Date published: 2005-07-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...unbeaten and unchallenged talent... As with all his previous books, Lemony Snicket proves in the Slippery Slope his unbeaten and unchallenged talent for making the most dire and unlikely situations incredibly humorous. While large-toothed baby Sunny Baudelaire is being held captive by the fallen thespian Count Olaf and his fashion-worshipping girlfriend Esme Squalor, her sister Violet and brother Klaus are battling clouds of snow gnats which attack and bite for no reason whatsoever, hiding their faces from Snow Scouts with fencing masks, and learning the secret dialect of fridges. Lemony Snicket also makes use of his wide range of vocabulary to find as many different words as possible that form the acronym V.F.D. With everything from the Vernacularly Fastened Door to the Volunteer Fire Department with a secret headquarters in the Valley of the Four Drafts in its list of definitions, V.F.D's meaning can change at a whim. Indeed, whether you're ten years old and looking for a good story or sixteen and looking for something easy to read and fun to laugh along with, The Slippery Slope is the perfect book for the job.
Date published: 2005-07-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...latest fun filled adventure... The Baudelaires are at it again! This time in their latest fun filled adventure, Violet, Klaus, and Sunny Baudelaire reach the peaks of Mortmain Mountains as well as Mount Fraught and the Valley of the Four Drafts. With Count Olaf on the trail, they have to reach the V.F.D. headquarters. Then someone finds them who is believed to be dead but can definitely help. It is Quigley Quagmire. Surviving the fire that destroyed his family' home, he' desperate to find his siblings. After everything seems good tragedies strike. Will the Baudelaires be able to survive this or will misfortune strike them like always? It's exciting and thrilling book because it is an adventure story that is written in a very exciting way. My favorite part is about Sunny's excellent cooking skills, even being a little child; Sunny has a great imagination and makes wonderful foods. Another favorite part of mine in the story is about the way Sunny talks. Count Olaf gets really frustrated because to him and his troops Sunny's way of talking is very annoying. This story is set on the peaks of the Mortmain Mountains, Mount Fraught and the Valley of the Four Drafts. Some of the main characters of this story are Olaf, his girlfriend Esme and their troop, Hugo, Kevin, two white-faced women, Colette, and a hook-handed man. The other main characters are Violet, Klaus, and Sunny Baudelaire and Quigley Quagmire. Other characters in this story are the man with a beard but no hair, the woman with hair but no beard and the snow scouts. This book has a very good ending and I do not feel that it needs to be changed. While reading this book I felt happy and joyful when a mystery was solved or when a funny part in the book arises. I felt scared when something bad would happen. This book reminds me of the Harry Potter series because it is similar to it. The Baudelaires are orphans just like Harry Potter. They both have to endure a very hard life though they have true friends. This book is nice and I recommend it for people who like to read adventure and non-fiction books as well as for people who are reading the series of unfortunate events.
Date published: 2005-07-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...a wonderful read... Excitement. Romance. Mystery. Drama. Fantasy. All woven into an intricate story for readers of many ages. Younger readers do not need to understand the difficult words, because they are all defined for them! Older readers enjoy the challenge of interpreting the strange definitions provided by the author, which only describe enough of the word to help the understanding of the story. The story itself is a wonderful read even if one does not notice the dropped hints left about VFD, the secret organization that the Beaudelaires are searching for. Mystery-lovers, or readers of Nancy Drew/Hardy Boys, are drawn into the search for VFD, while romancers enjoy reading about Violet and Quigley. The excitement and drama draw in far more children who just want to hear what happens to The Beaudelaire orphans next. Personally, I was drawn into the story when my mother was reading it to my little brother! I was caught up right away and read the books on my own. The Slippery Slope is an interesting twist to the tale of the Beaudelaire orphans. Violet and Klaus do manage to save Sunny after all, but then hope is destroyed once again, as characteristic of Lemony Snicket. I liked the tiny romance between Violet and Quigley, though if it had been more important to the story, or more described, I would not be sure that my brother would like it. I also enjoyed the mystery about VFD, though I did not spend much time puzzling it out. My friend, on the other hand, spent hours figuring out the meaning of VFD, and all the other dropped hints. A decidedly confusing aspect of the story is the connection with Lemony Snicket. I could well do without it. However, the connection is unlike any other that I have read of, between author and story. It adds to the uniqueness of the series, another aspect that draws readers to it like flies. I would have preferred the book, however, if it had ended on a slightly more hopeful note. Losing mostly all hope of ever finding VFD, which might draw readers to The Slippery Slope also loses others. My next-door neighbour does not read the series because it is too hopeless, and the characters too unbelievable. I believe that it is because the characters are so interesting that people want to read about them. I can relate to them--Klaus being a booklover and Violet being an elder sister, yet they are definitely not boring which they might be if I could relate to them too much. I would not change anything about The Slippery Slope, even though it might be nice for it to be a little more hopeful. Books with certainly happy endings line the shelves of most bookstores. The Slippery Slope provides an escape from conformity, and works the imagination about 'what will happen next'.
Date published: 2005-07-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...exciting twists and turns... The book A series of Unfortunate Events: The Slippery Slope was a very interesting read. One of the main reasons it is so interesting was the unique writing styles of the author. He explains his word choices and the dialogue the children are using. The story line makes The Slippery Slope and the rest of the series very exciting. The book is filled with exciting twists and turns throughout; when you thought the story would go one way the author took you on a journey the other. This book has all hidden codes, all revealing secrets and characters resurrected. Something that makes this book different is that Lemony Snicket, The supposed author is really just a character created by the real author who remains unknown. A series of Unfortunate Events: The Slippery Slope is one of the most interesting books I've read. This book got on my favourite list because it was so interesting and unique. I've only read the first of the series before. However I can tell how this book solves many previous mysteries and questions that were unanswered throughout the series. It was also quite different and a little different then the first. If I were to say any more you would have no reason to read it. In my opinion read at least the first book in the series The Bad Beginning , chances are you'll read more. In the end I have to say this book was an overall amazing tale. If you like something different from the other books on the shelf A series of Unfortunate Events: The Slippery Slope is definitely for you.
Date published: 2005-07-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...fun to read... Do you like snow gnats? Or sleeping in a casserole dish? Or being kidnapped? Probably not. The Baudelaire orphans, Violet (14), Klaus (13), and Sunny (one and a half) definitely don't either. In the Slippery Slope, the tenth book in A Series of Unfortunate Events by Lemony Snickett, Violet, Klaus and Quigley Quagmire ( the third triplet of Isadore and Duncan Quagmire) manage to find the VFD (volunteer fire department) headquarters way up in the Mortain mountains. They thought they would find one of their parents' at the headquarters but when they got there, it was burned down! But by who? Some of the remaining things that survived the fire were a trombone, a periscope (or was it a spyglass), an ice cream scoop and the pendulum of a grandfather clock. Perhaps someday Violet and Klaus (and maybe Sunny) might find out why. Gasp! Sunny is gone. What happened to her? Oh no! Count Olaf kidnapped her!! What will Violet and Klaus do? Will they find her? Or will Count Olaf leave the mountains before they can get her. I won't tell you - read the book and find out. Count Olaf and his troop are very rude to Sunny. They make her cook meals for them everday (although the meals were quite good.) And worst of all, they make her sleep in a casserole dish even though she is only one and a half years old. I like Violet because she is smart and even invented a signaling device to her, her siblings and her aunt from a sinking boat. Klaus loves to read and it has saved him and his siblings many times before. He is my favorite character. I also like Sunny because of the way she talks. They are all smart, but in different ways. Violet has an inventing mind, Klaus has a logical mind and Sunny, well she's curious and cute. My favorite part of the book is when Violet and Klaus got stung by snow gnats, tiny white bugs that live in the Mortain mountains. They love to sting people for no reason at all. It was funny because in every sentence they said just after they were stung, there was an ow in it. Here's an example, What should we - ow , Violet half asked (p 40). I learned from this book that I should be thankful that I have a good home and both of my parents! Most of all, I am very very thankful that somebody (besides my brother!) is not trying to steal my money or making me sleep in a casserole dish. My bed is comfy and cozy. I like this book because it has some action in it, but not too much. It is funny in some parts, and not so funny in other parts, and just like all fiction books, it's fun to read. Sometimes I couldn't put this book down because it was so good! Once I stayed up to 12:30 am just to read it. I loved this book!
Date published: 2005-07-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...most mysterious and exciting... That afternoon, there were no eagles in the skies over the Mortmain Mountains, but as Violet and Klaus stood up and looked in the direction Quigley was pointing; there was something in the sky that caught their attention. Because when Quigley Quagmire said, where there's smoke, there's fire , he was not referring to Klaus' theory about the destruction of V.F.D headquarters. He was talking about the sight of green smoke, wafting up into the sky from the peak of mount fraught, at the top of the slippery slope. A paragraph from one of the most mysterious and exciting books of our time. The Slippery Slope by Lemony Snicket, the tenth book of a series of unfortunate events tells us of the epic adventures of three unfortunate siblings, Violet, Klaus and Sunny, tormented by a scheming villain named Count Olaf who so desperatly wants the mass fortune their parents left after their mansion mysteriously caught on fire and killed their parents. But, after much research, they have come to a conclusion, The Snicket file and V.F.D. Are these two things what they need in order to uncover their past and future? Of all the books I have read, this beats all of them. A world built by imagination will surprise you at times, or intrigue you, or even confuse you. Strung by tales of epic and unfortunate events, it gives what every reader desires, a little Oomph! to it. Also, the fact that this is a biography of the Baudelaires catches my eye, because all my life I loved biographies and the fact that they have been through so much lately takes me to the edge of my seat, waiting for every book of their adventures to be released so that I can read every gripping word of their extraordinary adventures. It gets me so huffed up on reading the book that I asked four stores if they had The Grim Grotto, the eleventh book. The Slippery Slope takes you to a world of strange and distressing mountains filled with many surprises and shocks. It tells of the two Baudelaires on a harrowing journey across the Mortmain mountains on a journey to save their third sibling, Sunny. The Baudelaires face many unpleasant details along with a little luck on their side such as, a secret message, a deceitful trap, a swarm of snow gnats, a scheming villain, and a surprising survivor of a terrible fire. But don't get me wrong, aside from all those details, I guarantee that it's the best book of our time. Now, what really suprises me is that despite of all this misfortune, the Baudelaires still won't give up hope. Every day they pray that their lives will get better, that at least one of their parents is still alive, that their friends are healthy and well, and that Count Olaf will be put to justice. The book really tells you that despite all the bad things that are happening, your wishes and dreams will come true.
Date published: 2005-07-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...tickled my funnybone... The Baudeleaire children meet some very unfortunate event in this book. Violet was an inventor; whenever she was going to invent something she would tie her hair up in a ribbon to keep it out of her eyes. Klaus is a bookworm. He's the one that would do the research on a place or a thing that they might run into. You could say that we match because we both love to discover through reading. Last but not least their's baby Sunny. Except in this book she's not such a baby anymore she's a bit grown up and she's has more sharp teeth. This book is favorable for someone who likes a scary story and adventure put into one. I don't advise it to someone who get frightened easily. To me, riding down a frozen waterfall on a wooden sled would be a horrifying event. You can get some laughs out of this book also. Klaus, Violet and her friend watching Count Olaf's girlfriend slide down the frozen waterfall in her ball of fire gown, tickled my funnybone. I have read some of the other books in this series but this one is definitely the best. It shows that you have alot to be thankful for. Being stung by snow gnats for no good reason when you're only trying to find your sister; now that's what I call unfortunate. The three Baudelaire children all have their good character qualities. They will still have to observe their surrounding for Count Olaf because he might be watching from the eye tattoo on his ankle. This gave me the creeps. The children will go on having a series of unfortunate events which seem to wait for them to tackle and over-come. A mysterious, spell-binding book that kept me reading until the last page; a must read for any bookworm.
Date published: 2005-07-04
Rated 1 out of 5 by from ...I hated it... When these books first came out, and everyone was singing their praises, I got the first one out of the library and read it. I must confess that I hated it - that hasn't changed. I decided to give him another chance with his tenth book; his writing style hasn't changed a bit. This book, as he explains all the time, the next instalment of the Baudelaire case. In fact if you want to know what it is about, all you have to do is read the back cover, now that you have found out the entire plot of the story, please take his advice and throw it in the nearest ˜trash receptacle . In my opinion, he puts way too much effort into reverse psychology; in fact that effort would be much better spent thinking up of a better plot! Something that Lemony Snicket does that gets on my nerves, is that he loves to use commonplace sayings, as well as vocabulary that ranges from commonplace to mildly challenging. I myself am an avid reader, and over the many years, I have gathered quite a vocabulary- I don't need every word explained to me! If he feels the need to define all these words, then they probably shouldn't be there in the first place. Also, he randomly decides to fill several pages of his book with useless scribbling; that doesn't even relate to the story! Remove them please! He goes on and on about how sad and weepy his readers are after reading his work; when I read this book my face had a look of incredulous disbelief. I am in fact an emotional reader, and any book that contains a well written sad part, receives my full empathy. I tear up at the start, if somebody I like dies, tears start streaming down my face. Nothing of this sort happened to me during this book. Lemony Snicket says he is going to make you cry, maybe he means that in a humorous way, but he certainly didn't succeed. I really don't believe how many people actually read his books, I mean he must be getting pretty rich of them- and what are they? Trashy novels with barely a plot to speak of. The only unique thing that these books have is the idea of making a miserable book. With Violet, Klaus, and Sunny, they have a perfect team, yet fate just seems to be against them, as I say the only edge that he has on people is the fact that no one else advertises a miserable book, only to produce this junk! The only people in my opinion that should read this book are people with a tiny vocabulary, who are egged on by his constant insistence that they shouldn't read further. This is no book for the well educated, it insults your intelligence! These books have sold well, but for what reason? That is something that I would sincerely like to know!
Date published: 2005-07-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...the most intense so far... The Slippery Slope is the tenth book in the Series of Unfortunate Events. In this series of books three orphans make their way to try to find the one possible parent that may have survived the fire that orphaned them. In each of these books the orphans have different guardians, while Olaf, their first and evil guardian pursues them to get the Baudelaire fortune. These orphans hope to find a guardian who may be able to protect, and actually love them. In each book Olaf's hatred for the orphans deepens and he devises more determined plots to capture them. The Slippery Slope is the most intense so far in this series. Sunny Baudelaire is separated from her elder brother and sister. Violet, Klaus and Quigley (friend) work together to try to free Sunny from Olaf. I can relate to Klaus because he loves to read just like me. Violet on the other hand is a whiz mechanic and Sunny is the baby with tiger teeth. Together, they work to get out of hard situations. The three orphans are becoming more independent in each book. I would like to see the orphans get a safe home (after 20 books maybe). I have loved all of these books because they can keep me guessing and never fail to be surprising. They show me how no matter how hard it gets I should never give up. I so very much like this book, but be prepared for the extremely miserable, hopeless times that these orphans endure. I would recommend reading this entire series in sequence; otherwise you may be rather confused. If you enjoy these you might also like the Chronicles of Narnia by C.S. Lewis. or His Dark Materials, the series by Phillip Pullman.
Date published: 2005-07-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...one for all ages... The tenth book of Snicket's work starts off with the Baudelaire orphans Klaus and Violet in quite a predicament, which in here means (as the author would say) hurtling down a mountain in a rickety caravan with a slim chance of survival . Another one of the eldest Baudelaire's inventions, while it leaves them stranded on the slippery slopes of the Mortaim Mountains, solves their predicament. While her siblings are in this pickle, Sunny is forced to do Count Olaf's cooking with no fire, do impossible chores, and have her teeth constantly made fun of. Meanwhile, Klaus and Violet search desperately for V.F.D headquarters, instead they find a troupe of accommodating, basic, calm, darling, emblematic, frisky, grinning, human, innocent, jumping, kept, limited, meek, nap-loving, official, pretty, quarantined, recent, scheduled, tidy, understandable, victorious, xylophone, young and zippered group called the snow scouts, who have Carmelita Spats as their leader, and a mysterious fellow who claims to know a secret way to the elder Baudelaire's destination. At Olaf's hideout, the appearance of two new people, a man with no hair but a beard and a lady with hair but no beard, makes the Count becomes almost afraid. Who are these people? Can this fellow be trusted? What will happen at the V.F.D headquarters? Questions that will be answered in Lemony Snicket's The Slippery Slope. This book, like the rest of Snickets' work, is one for all ages. The author continues his funny yet serious writing style, creating a secure storyline with excellent description, especially on the miserable topics. The population of readers who are continuing to enter the unfortunate world of the Baudlelaire orphans will get nothing less out of this sad but comedic novel. Snicket's skills of somehow making it seem as if he has experienced everything first hand put him in a new, original category of writing, one that anyone over the exceptional 7-year old can enjoy.
Date published: 2005-07-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...I just couldn't stop reading... When I read the Slippery Slope the first time I just couldn't stop reading. It was a fairly good book even though instead of mystery and adventure, I would have preferred a book with fantasy or a fairytale included. Lemony Snicket, the author of this story has a fantastic style of writing. I love it! He writes as if he is investigating the Baudelaires past and telling the whole world what they had to go through. However, I expected more in some parts of this book which were flat and needed some livening up, particularly when dealing with the characters' feelings. The story is one of a series of books on the Baudelaire children entitled, A Series of Unfortunate Events. It begins on a cold, slippery mountain where the three Baudelaire children have more bad luck. The three of them get separated and have to find their way back to each other. Violet, Klaus and Sunny need to finally escape from Count Olaf's grasp. He and his gang of villains are trying to defeat the children so that they can steal the fortune that Violet will inherit when she comes of age. As with the previous books in this series, the three children have to find a way to escape, yet again. With the help of the their talents and skills, they have to work hard and persevere to defeat Count Olaf. The Slippery Slope is very good and I would recommend it to people who like to read adventure stories, mystery stories or anyone who just likes to read a good book. Lemony Snicket must have an amazing imagination for writing such good stories. I love the way he uses difficult words then explains what they mean in brackets using examples from the story. Mr. Snicket describes the story well and adds detail where appropriate, which makes it a pleasure to read. Sometimes, while reading, I felt as if I was standing in the middle of the scene, with the world around me completely shut out. However, even though the characters are explained nicely, the book could be even more enjoyable if the characters were given more emotion and expressed how they felt while overcoming adversity. Overall though, it is a wonderful book that stimulated my imagination and keeps me interested in reading more adventure books. I hope that Mr. Snicket continues his series of unfortunate events because I am very curious what awaits the Baudelaire children before Violet comes of age.
Date published: 2005-07-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...interesting, sad and exciting... From beginning to end, this story takes place in a mountain setting. The Baudelaires go to the mysterious headquarters of V.F.D., where they find many answers, but even more mysteries. There were things I liked and things I disliked, so I'm going to start with what I liked about the book. Some characters were far more developed, such as Sunny, the youngest Baudelaire. I liked the fact that it takes clues from the earlier novels and adds them up to create answers. I also liked that the book teaches you neat new words like Denouement. What I disliked about the book was the continued arrogance of some of the characters, such as Esme Squalor (the girlfriend of the villian, Count Olaf) and Carmelita (a brat introduced in Book No. 5). The other thing that continues to bother me is that, despite this being the tenth book in the series, only one character seems to have aged. Once again. one character I particularly disliked was the character of Carmelita Spats, because she was a twup (which I, Benjamin Miller, have made up. This word is similar in meaning to moron but has an arrogant trait as well). I think this book would appeal to more than one age group because it is interesting, sad and exciting. What does this book remind me of? Hmmmmm......Let me think about this one. It reminds me of the other nine books in the series. Finally, at the end of the book, I would add a scene where the Baudelaires reach their final destination, only to find ......
Date published: 2005-07-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...one that adventure lovers will treasure... Hello! Clever Kate reporting! I have just recently finished reading a wonderful novel called The Slippery Slope. Although the author warns the reader amply against reading this book, I don't happen to agree. But do read at least a few Snicket books first, so you'll have some idea of what's going on (this is the latest in a long series). Where the last book in the Series of Unfortunate Events (The Carnivorous Carnival) left off, Violet and Klaus were hurtling down a mountain in a caravan while their baby sister Sunny was in Count Olaf's clutches. Violet and Klaus manage to stop the caravan and start to walk up the mountain, where they encounter snow gnats and the Snow Scouts. They meet up with Quigly Quagmire, who was thought to be dead, and find the V.F.D. that has been burnt to a crisp by a raging fire. There, Quigly, Violet, and Klaus start planning how to save their sister. This book, like the others in this series, is one that adventure lovers will treasure, because Violet, Klaus, and Sunny have many adventures, including hiking on a mountain, crawling through a rocky passageway, and climbing up a frozen waterfall. I do not recommend it to people who love books with happy endings and people who love books where the villain is defeated. In this book, unlike the others in this series, Klaus and Violet almost become villains themselves to save their sister, but stop just in time. Lemony Snicket's suspenseful novel will have readers hooked even after it ends, and they will be waiting anxiously for the next book to see what happens to Violet, Klaus, and Sunny. The slippery slope has an exciting twist of happiness and sadness. I enjoyed this book because it kept me asking for more and so I wanted to keep reading. This book gives you chills in one chapter and the feeling of relief in another.
Date published: 2005-07-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...very amusing and mysterious... The Slippery Slope is a very amusing and mysterious book, written with so much creativity and style you'll wonder how the author, Lemony Snicket became so brilliant. This hilarious novel is the most recent in A Series Of Unfortunate Events, which is one continuos story about three siblings: Violet, Klaus and Sunny Baudelaire, whose parents perished in a fire, the cause of which is still undetermined. The Baudelaires had been passed from one guardian to another as each guardian is scared off the responsibility, kidnapped or murdered by Count Olaf, a horrible villain with an aura of menace as Snicket would say. If I were forced to choose, this would be my favourite of the series because its so funny and it solves some of the ongoing mysteries and creates some new ones. But one of the best things about these books is how Lemony describes everything so well with similes, making you able to connect almost immediately. One of my favourites in The Slippery Slope is: Having an aura of menace is like having a pet weasel, because you rarely meet someone who has one, and when you do it makes you want to hide under the coffee table. If you are looking for a creative book, with a surprising and spontaneous ending, hilarious narration and an intertwining and spectacular plot, the whole Series of Unfortunate Events, is for you, especially The Slippery Slope.
Date published: 2005-07-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from I enjoyed this book a lot! I think that when you read a Series of Unfortunate Events book you become immersed in the interesting and not necessarily always funny pages, and the Slippery Slope managed to do just that. I enjoyed reading about the unfortunate and sometimes extreme events or the Baudelaire Orphans concerning Count Olaf and VFD. I have been reading the series for a long time and every time I find myself unable to put the book down because of its interesting subjects and characters. Although the book can be slightly depressing it is mostly filled with little jokes and interesting facts that make you even more interested in the story. I enjoyed this book a lot!
Date published: 2005-07-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from I loved this Book! The three Baudelaire children are orphans who have had a lot of guardians. Each time that they went to a new guardian, Count Olaf followed them. Count Olaf was an evil man who was after the Baudelaire's fortune since their parents died in a fire that also burned down their house. At the beginning of the book Count Olaf manages to kidnap the youngest Baudelaire, Sunny and trap the two other Baudelaire, Violet and Klaus in a camper that was rolling down a mountain in the shape of stairs. Luckily the two siblings managed to escape from the camper just in time. On the way to save their sister, Violet and Klaus met a group of snow scouts. The two Baudelaire decided to stay with the group for a while. In the middle of a campfire, one of the scouts leaned over to say to the Baudelaire that he knew where they could talk and no one would interfere. They met when every one was asleep. The scout took the Baudelaire to a place that was right beside Count Olaf's Hideout . Violet, Klaus and the scout managed to save Sunny. The Baudelaire got separated from the scout. I loved this Book! This book is amazing. I can't imagine how Lemony Snicket had the idea to write these books. I really liked it when Violet and Klaus found out that the scout was Quigley Quagmires. I didn’t like it when the bad people got away. I would like it if Esmé, Count Olaf and his troop would be caught and send to jail where nobody could escape. I think, I relate to Klaus most of all because I love Reading. I think that anybody who likes adventure, suspense, sad and unfortunate events, will like or love this book and it series. If I could change anything, I would probably change the end. Like I said earlier, Olaf and his troop could be sent to jail. This book did not make me think of anything except the movies that are coming out and that are based on the books. I can hardly wait to see them.
Date published: 2005-07-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...one of the most superb books... Lemony Snicket has really out-done himself this time. The Slippery Slope is the tenth novel in Snicket's ˜series of unfortunate events and is definitely not a disappointment to those that have been waiting for it. In this new adventure thirteen-year-old Klaus Baudelaire and his fourteen-year-old sister Violet must rescue their infant sibling Sunny, who is being held captive by the vile Count Olaf and his sinister followers. To save their sister Klaus and Violet must make the perilous assent of Mt. Mortmain where Count Olaf is imprisoning Sunny. I think that the Slippery Slope is one of the most superb books I have had the pleasure of reading. When I received the novel for my birthday I immediately began to read it. The only problem was that as soon as I opened the book it was almost impossible to persuade me to put it down! Lemony Snicket's new style of writing is both understandable and interesting. I would be lying if I said that Lemony Snicket doesn't go off topic, but that's part of what makes his books so amazingly special. The blend of descriptive words, excitement, and fascinating information makes all of Snicket's book definite must-reads. The characters Snicket creates are exciting, but still believable, and not so realistic that they're predictable and boring. All the characters have just the right mix of bravery, courage, humor, loyalty, strength, honesty, wisdom, intelligence, kindness, humility, and cruelty to be convincing and interesting. Snicket has a great talent for making characters that are both memorable and inspiring. The plot of the story is extremely wonderful. The combination of suspense, excitement, mystery, and of course humor make the plot brilliant. Almost as soon as one mystery is solved another appears. And problems are constantly being discovered and resolved. This makes a great recipe for suspense and action. Some may suspect that this makes the story disorganized and unclear, but it simply adds to the excitement and adventure of the story. I would recommend the Slippery Slope to avid readers, occasional readers, and people who really don't fancy reading at all. The Slippery Slope is well suited for anyone from nine years of age to ninety-nine years old. The Slippery Slope is good to read if you want a laugh, need to relax and recline or if your tired of your life and want to live someone else's. You can read the Slippery Slope first, but I recommend you begin with the first volume: the Bad Beginning. The Slippery Slope can be read, however, and understood without reading any of the other books in the series. I would have to say that the Slippery Slope is among my favorite books and would suggest to read it and see if you would like to add it to your ˜favorites list. In conclusion I would say that Lemony Snicket's the Slippery Slope is a gripping and thrilling novel that deserves to be read by everyone!
Date published: 2005-07-04
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ...a good story line... I, as a reader, could take Slippery Slope, or leave it. However, people who like slaves, villains, cold mountains and much more would really like this book. Lemony Snicket's The Slippery Slope has it all. Slippery Slope starts as Violet and Klaus are riding in a caravan as it is following Count Olaf's black car. Count Olaf kidnapped Sunny. Violet and Klaus are determined to find their sister. On their adventure, Violet and Klaus are attacked by a swarm of snow gnats and they meet a group call the Snow Scouts in a cave that have a fire to keep the goats away. At night, one of the Snow Scouts and Violet and Klaus climb up the Vertical Flame Diversion to the V.F.D. Headquarters. They continue out to the waterfall where it leads up to the top of Mount Fought. Violet invents a type of climbing device that helps them get to the top. Violet uses forks she took from the caravan to create the device. The climbing device allows Violet and Klaus and the Snow Scout to weave their way up the very tall waterfall to rescue Sunny. After making a very clever plan an unexpected mishap occurs, so Violet and Klaus have to think up another plan. In the end, the Baudelaire children are reunited again - ready for another adventure, I am sure. I have read a book that is very similar to The Slippery Slope, entitled Everest. It is about three people who go climbing up a bone chilling mountain to the top. All around were mountains just like in the book The Slippery Slope. I could tell the people must feel very cold and hungry, just like Violet and Klaus do in The Slippery Slope. One good thing about this book is that it has powerful sentences that made me think how the kids were feeling. One sentence that made me start to think was It was clear that the slippery slope was almost as exhausted as they were, and soon the ice would vanish completely. It was a good example of how tired they were from their adventure. Another good thing was it had a good story line. Chasing, location, rescue are all a good part of the story line. Could Lemony Snicket, in his next book, put two kids with Count Olaf and have one that is trying to rescue them? This would allow Lemony Snicket to have two plot lines so all the plot lines aren't the same in his books. I wonder where Lemony Snicket will send the Baudelaires next?
Date published: 2005-07-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...I loved them all... My name is Daniel Bevan-Baker and I'm from Hampton, P.E.I. I'm 10 years old going into grade 6 at Englewood school. I love reading and I really got hooked on the Series of Unfortunate Events books this spring. I've just finished the tenth book in the series. If I had to compare this book to the other nine books in the series, I think all the books would be pretty equally matched. Book number ten didn't really stand out from the others although I loved them all. I read book #5 and book #7 in one day. All ten are the best books I've ever read. The reason The Slippery Slope didn't really stand out for me is because there were some boring parts in it, and there were some sections that confused me a little bit. My favourite part of the book was when Quigley and Violet made climbing shoes by using forks attached to their shoes and climbing up the waterfall. My least favourite part was when Klaus, Violet and Quigley were looking at the food inside the fridge that they found at the bottom of the waterfall. This bit was kind of boring and unexciting. I think the main character in the book is Sunny Baudelaire because at the end of the ninth book, Sunny is kidnapped by Count Olaf and she is doing all the chores for the Count and his evil troupe. In the tenth book Klaus and Violet set out to find her. If anyone hasn't read this book I've made up my own synopsis for it. Here it is! At the beginning of this book Violet and Klaus Baudelaire are rolling down a mountain in a mini caravan. Their baby sister, Sunny was kidnapped by Count Olaf . Klaus and Violet have to search for Sunny and save her or Count Olaf might steal the Baudelaire fortune. Poor little Sunny has to work for Count Olaf and his troupe by cooking meals, washing the dishes, and doing other miserable chores that a baby couldn't possibly do. Meanwhile the older Baudelaires find a very surprising survivor from a fire and they all encounter new mysteries to solve. Together they think up plans and invent devices to save Sunny. Find out all the mysteries and the new characters, when you read this book... I really enjoyed the series and I have passed on the books to my friend Cameron. Now he is addicted to them and says they are the kind of books you can't put down. I feel the same way. I can't wait to get my hands on the next three books!
Date published: 2005-07-04
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ...weird humour... The newest Unfortunate Events book, The Slippery Slope, continues right where the ninth book, The Carnivorous Carnival, left off. In the perilous Mortmain Mountains, Klaus and Violet Baudelaire meet another well-read person who helps them rescue Sunny from the evil clutches of Count Olaf and his henchmen as they all near the last safe place. In this book, Daniel Handler, (a.k.a. Lemony Snicket) uses some of the same type of weird humour that made the other books in the series so popular. The Slippery Slope is not that different from books 1 through 9, although the Baudelaires do make a few astonishing discoveries. The book follows the same path, the Baudelaires just keep meeting horrible people and getting into sticky situations, and of course the ending is just as dreadful as the ending from The Bad Beginning, or The Vile Village. I really don't recommend this book for anyone, because in the words of Lemony Snicket, why would you want to read a book with unpleasant things such as a secret message, a toboggan, a deceitful trap, a swarm of snow gnats, a scheming villain, a troupe of organized youngsters, a covered casserole dish, and a surprising survivor of a terrible fire. So please, do him a favour and let this slippery book slip from your hands into a nearby trash receptacle, or deep pit. If you like stories that don't follow a traditional format, then this book is for you. However, if you like books with heroism, bravery and happy endings, then I suggest you don't read this book.
Date published: 2005-07-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...our whole-hearted thanks... Dear Reader: If you are reading this, it must mean that you are either crazy or unsuspecting of the dreadful compliments and terrible critics for the book The Slippery Slope, which makes up this book review. The book was written by Lemony Snicket, who spends his life researching the misadventures of the Baudelaire orphans. In this tenth book of A Series of Unfortunate Events , the three orphans (but are they really orphans anymore?) are separated by a frozen waterfall. Sunny and Count Olaf's troupe are at the top of the waterfall, Violet and Klaus are at the bottom of both waterfall and hope. The story includes sharp forks, a burnt refrigerator, and a sight no less sorry than that of the Baudelaire Manson ashes. The end is so depressing that I cannot bear to tell of it. Mr. L. Snicket is possibly and probably in hiding somewhere on Earth, but I (and the misery-loving public) would like to give our whole-hearted thanks for inflicting these tales of misery and woe upon us. We now know of things different from our normal, Count Olaf-free lives. One might say the difference makes quite a difference. Mr. Helquiest's truly dreadful illustrations also contribute to the overall burdensome impression of this sad and sorry tale. Before you close this computer window, throw this into the garbage or over a cliff, which I know you are about to do, you should know that the public awaits the next unpleasant and unhappy book in the series, which will be released in September. Then we'll be one step closer to unveiling the mysteries of V.F.D., and bring it to light, whether it wants to or not. With all due respect, H.Z.
Date published: 2005-07-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...exciting and interesting... In this one-of-a-kind tale, Violet and Klaus Baudelaire, are on a misson, an adventurous and dangerous misson. The purpose of the misson is to find the whereabouts of a secret organization as well as their sister, Sunny. But when Violet and Klaus are close to their destination, something unxpected awaits them. I think this book is most appropriate for older children, preteens and teenagers. I really enjoyed this book but I think I might have understood it better if I had read the rest of the series. Otherwise the book is excellent. It has a lot of detail and you can invision the story in your head. Sometimes you feel you are actually in the story. You can feel the excitement, the anger and the feelings of the characters. You can imagine what you would do if you were the characters. It may not be the same as the story, but it's fun to compare them. This is a sad story as well as exciting and interesting. I don't think anyone would like to be in a situation like this. I know I wouldn't.
Date published: 2005-07-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...one hundred points out of ten... Lemony Snicket is either a genius, crazy, or both. His way of writing is so mysterious that the story is somehow impossibly possible. You'll be so convinced by every amazing aspect of the incredible plot and realistic characters that you will believe it's all true (until you stop reading and have enough time to regain your common sense; once you've finished the whole book). Adults might say that the author successfully incorporates all three persons of grammar to tell the story of the Baudelaire orphans, which he seems to be a part of. Younger kids might say that this book (and the rest of its series) is confusing, but not too much. I might say: this is by far the best book I have ever read. Though it is a good idea to read the rest of A Series of Unfortunate Events before beginning The Slippery Slope, It isn't altogether necessary. Lemony Snicket manages to fill readers in on the main events of the preceding books, while not making it boring or repetitive for those who already know; something many authors fail to achieve. I can't wait until the next book in the series is out, as the way The Slippery Slope ends can only mean that the story will continue. The best (and biggest) of all ten books so far, I would give this volume one hundred points out of ten. Also recommended: encourage your friends to read The Slippery Slope, as they might find a few clues in the plot that you may have missed. The whole mystery is complicated, but in the best way that ever existed!
Date published: 2005-07-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A must read for Snicket fans! In the Slippery Slope, the latest installment of Lemony Snicket's Series of Unfortunate Events, misfortune has once again found Violet, Klaus and Sunny Baudelaire. The three children have recently lost their parents in a terrible fire. Their parents were former V.F.D. members, which is a secret organization. Wherever these children hide, the evil Count Olaf, also V.F.D. tries to find them. He's after them for their fortune and he's nasty. In book ten, Sunny is kidnapped by Olaf and taken to the Mortmain Mountains. Violet and Klaus must find him before time runs out. There are so many twists throughout. As you read the story you think you know what's going to happen, then Snicket completely surprises you. I quite enjoyed this book; in fact it is worth the week of hard labour imposed upon me by my parents to buy the book. Snicket does an excellent job of describing the Baudelaire's misfortune and misery. A must read for Snicket fans!
Date published: 2005-07-04
Rated 3 out of 5 by from The Slippery Slope As the tenth book begins Sunny Baudelaire is trapped by Count Olaf and his troupe are heading up the Mortmain Mountains while Klaus and Violet are heading down trapped in an out of control caravan. Now with the help of a surprising survivor of a terrible fire the Baudelaires must save their sister and find the secret headquarters of V.F.D. before Count Olaf gets their first and with False Spring on the way things are going to get wet. What I liked about the book is that the author writes it as if he was a real reporter and that the story is actually true. What I dislike about the book is that so many things have the initials V.F.D. and that there are so many new things that they can't figure out so now at the end they have more unanswered questions than they do answers and they barely learned anything. Another ending is that Quigley doesn't get seperated from the Baudelaires and they make their way to the hotel the fastest. I felt that this book wasn't as good as the other ones but it wasn't the worst either. I think I'm related to Klaus because I'm well read and I like to take notes and use information I've read. If you like heartwarming and funny books, like the author says This is not a book for you. If you like books where the author is against all odds and it seems like they're never going to win but they stick together then this is a good book for you. If I could change one thing it would be to have Jaques Snicket fake his death and help the Baudelaires to tell them where the hotel is and then get caught by the eagles. I think is a book which is unique and can't relate to anything I've read or seen.
Date published: 2005-07-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...you are compelled to read... Book the tenth, as inscribed on the cover, The Series of Unfortunate Events: The Slippery Slope continues the extremely unfortunate adventures of the Baudelaire triplets. This tenth book in the series is just as horrible, scary, slippery, and depressing as the nine before it. Following the Baudelaire's adventures is quite a depressing job, really. They are on the road that is travelled by few others. Following them, you find out more about their past, and what may happen in their future, a word that here means, if they survive, they will grow up and continue on tomorrow . The Baudelaire triplets find out more about what their parents did, the organization V.F.D., and what happens when you leave a message in a pickle container in a refrigerator of a burned out hideout. And could that be a person that everyone thought was dead? However, you do not fing enough out that you do not want to keep reading more of this horrible, horrible story. Now, you are compelled to read more of this horrible book and series. What was that? Sorry, it seems as thought I was taken over there for a moment, oh dear. I love this whole series, and the tenth book just makes the series get better and better! What with everything that happens, it is awesome! At 337 pages, it is quite long, but well worth the read. Lemony Snicket has crafted a wonderful series, and I'll be a fan of it for a long time to come. The Slippery Slope is as well written as any book I have read, and that is a real plus when I read books. So, if you are just a newcomer to the series, or have been reading the series for awhile, make sure to read The Series of Unfortunate Events: The Slippery Slope! I hope that you enjoy this book, and the whole series, for that fact, as much as I did! Happy reading!
Date published: 2005-07-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...Snicket out does himself... Once again Lemony Snicket out does himself with the 10th book of his series, The Slippery Slope. 3 orphans, Violet, Klaus and Sunny, fight for they're survival against Count Olaf and his hench-men. Only this time, Sunny is trapped in the clenches of the enemy and Violet and Klaus must escape a runaway trailer to save her and also find the mysterious headquarters of V.F.D. before Count Olaf does. This book takes place in the Mortmain Mountains where the V.F.D. headquarters is to be located. As always, Violet thinks up outrageous inventions to get them out of troubles way. Sunny on the other hand is as close to danger as she could be. After having to endure villain bad breath, sleeping in a casserole bowl, making meals and clean dishes in the snow, Sunny finds one thing that helps her endure all of this.... No one can understand what she saids. This very thing is what keeps her going, that and the hope that her siblings are all right. This book is more based around Sunny and her actions, with a little bit of Violet and Klaus taking up the rear. Though, Violet and Klaus do have their moments here and there. And... What's this? Has Violet fallen for a boy they met on the way up the mountain?? ;) *Gasp* Two new characters are introduced into the story, though Snicket doesn't name them for certain reasons unknown. When these two people show up, Sunny notices something, Count Olaf's almost... Afraid of them??? *Deeper Gasp! * Whoever these 2 mysterious people are; they carry with them the Snicket file. (DUN Dun dunnnnn) I enjoyed this book very much, seeing as this is the only book series I read besides Harry Potter. I laughed, I cried, I laughed, and I yelled, DON'T GO TOWARD THEM YOU FOOLS! and I even mumbled under my breath as I read this touching/horrifying chapter of the orphans adventure. I believe this book would appeal to anyone who's read Harry Potter or likes to read something a little different from: They lived happily ever after. So I'll end this with the following questions to rattle around in little brains: Can Sunny over hear Count Olaf and discover the truth? Will Violet and Klaus find the secret of V.F.D? And.... How can a bunch of birds carry about 20 or 30 children and a couple adults... in a net?
Date published: 2005-07-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...a very humorous book... Lemony Snicket created this 10th book in the Series of Unfortunate Events in a clever and odd sort of fashion. The VFD, an organization, consisting of Count Olaf and his accomplices, try to steal the Baudelaire orphans' fortune. Violet, Klaus and Sunny, the three Baudelaires, try to escape from the evil Count Olaf. In this tenth book of the series, he kidnaps Sunny and brings her to Mortmain Mountain, forcing her siblings to chase after and save her. This rough ride up a windy mountain is the perfect plots to have the most unfortunate events happen to these poor children. They encounter many unfortunate happenings including a fire and snow gnats. However, not all the events are horrible; the Baudelaire orphans meet Quigley Quagmire, one of the Quagmire siblings. Many people thought he was dead, but he managed to escape the fire that burned down his house. The three Baudelaire orphans have wonderful traits that are distinctively different. All three children are young and bright but they get their wits from different areas. Violet, the oldest of the three, is very good at inventing things. Her inventions are fascinating and I enjoy them very much. Klaus, the only boy of the orphans, reads a lot to gain his knowledge. Sunny still talks in baby language, but the three siblings understand each other very well and that creates a strong bond between them that I feel is very important. Quigley helps the Baudelaire with his cartography skills. I feel he is the most important part of the book. In every book, Lemony Snicket gives us an extra clue to what the VFD stands for and gets us one-step closer to solving the mystery. This book uses VFD as Volunteer Fire Department. I feel this is a very humorous book. The climax of the humor however was with the Snow Scouts. Their pledge is an awkward one that even confused Violet and Klaus. I feel that I would not change anything in the book. Nevertheless, I feel that the series is dragging on a bit too long. I feel that there should be an ending because the Baudelaire orphans have been escaping Count Olaf for ten books already. I really would like to see an ending to this wonderful series. I recommend this book to any child who likes to read books and get a good laugh and mystery at the same time. It is phenomenal, but its even better if you start from book one!
Date published: 2005-07-04
Rated 1 out of 5 by from ...unattractive or boring style... In The Slippery Slope, number 10 in A Series of Unfortunate Events, Violet and Klaus, the two eldest Baudelaire orphans, must rescue their little sister Sunny from the clutches of Count Olaf who wants the Baudelaire fortune. In earlier books, Violet, Klaus and Sunny's parents died because of a fire in their house, after which they were sent off to boarding school. They met two of the three Quagmire triplets whose parents and third triplet were killed in a house fire or were they? The 5 friends evaded Count Olaf many times until the Quagmires and the Baudelaires were separated. Now, Count Olaf thinks he has killed Violet and Klaus and has Sunny as his slave. Violet and Klaus are still alive, and trying to find the VFD headquarters in the Mortmain Mountains. In a previous book, they received information that one of their parents wasn't killed and their searching has led them this far. They were chased by snow gnats and have ducked into a cave where they meet the Snow Scouts. They are all dressed alike except for one, who also keeps saying things like Volunteer Feline Detectives or Very Fun Day. Then, in the middle of the night the stranger wakes the two Baudelaires and says: Come with me, Baudelaires. I know a shortcut to the headquarters. Who is this stranger? Where is the Headquarters? Will Sunny escape? Read the book to find out! I didn't like this book, because Lemony Snicket, the author, kept saying things like inseparable, a word which here means close friends. If he had said this once or twice it might make me smile like it did the first time. But the amount a sequence like this is used in the book makes me feel like Snicket thinks that the reader has a limited vocabulary. Snicket often distracts the flow of the story with digressions. An example is if he is talking about how a code in a fridge works then starts talking about how he will never get to eat his pickle that was in the fridge. I find that distracting and lots of unnecessary writing that doesn't help the story at all. Snicket also spends too much time talking about previous books in the series, something that is difficult and confusing for readers who have not read the previous books. It doesn't help a reader new to the series when Violet and Klaus start comparing their most recent adventure to a previous adventure, or when they start thinking something like oh, will we ever see our friends again? We should have gone with them when they escaped on that airship (that's not an exact quote, just something to give you an idea.). For me, that is just a wasted sentence. Snicket is like a few other authors to me. Good idea and plot, but an unattractive or boring style and definitely not a book I would want to buy.
Date published: 2005-07-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...it's so captivating... In The Slippery Slope the Baudelaires get into more danger and find themselves unraveling many mysteries. Each time a problem is solved a new one seems to arise, as the Baudelaires try to decipher the true meaning of V.F.D, and try to make sense of the codes, secrets, and challenges facing them. Klaus and Violet seperate from their sister Sunny as the caravan fastened onto Count Olaf's car is cut off, and the two are sent hurtling downwards on a spiraling hill in the chilly Mortmain Mountains. Fortunately the two are saved by Violet's quick inventions. They meet up with a group called Snow Scouts and are introduced to Quigley Quagmire who really escaped the fire. The threesome enter the V.F.D headquarters, which is burned down, and exchange information among themselves regarding the mystery of V.F.D. They have an unpleasant encounter with two unknown V.F.D members. Along the way come a saga of surprises, secrets and dangers as the Baudelaires try to make sense of the clues that survived the fire as well as rescuing Sunny. Regrettably the Baudelaires discover more danger as they cascade down the waterfall of the Stricken Stream and are separated from Quigley leading to a path of the great unknown. What I enjoyed about this book was that it's so captivating . Once you start you can't stop because it is so intense. The great part of this book is that you can read it anytime and anywhere. Every time I opened up this book it just grabbed me and took me to another place and time. A place where excitement was bound to happen. A place where danger and adventure were alike. The greatest part about this book is that once you're finished you can't wait to see what adventures lurk in the next book. Personally I think that the Baudelaires were one of the most admirable characters ever. Their willingness to tackle any problem that is thrown their way makes you feel like anything is possible. But one of the things that I didn't enjoy so much was that Sunny was a bit too grown up for a baby. I don't think that babies can concoct a meal let alone eavesdrop on villains. This part was a bit unrealistic, even for the Baudelaires. At times in the book Lemony Snicket tended to venture on to topics that had nothing to do with the actual story. A good example is when he hides a secret letter to Beatrice in the book. I thought that that was quite unnecessary. I think that The Slippery Slope is a great read for anyone who's ever wanted to go on an adventure or to escape into a fantasy world of villains, mysteries, and secrets. The great part about this book is that it is so versatile in many ways. This book has a bit of romance (between Quigley and Violet), a lot of mystery, and a ton of excitement to leave you on a joyride filled with adventure.
Date published: 2005-07-04
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ...completely unique... They're back! Count Olaf and the Baudelaire orphans are back in the latest part of the Series of Unfortunate Events. In this book Klaus and Violet are found heading down a mountain in an uncontrollable caravan, while Sunny is in Count Olaf's clutches, as he and his crew are driving up the mountain. In order to save themselves the two older Baudelaires use one of Violet's inventions to get away. After gathering some things with them the two start hiking up the mountain in order to find their sister. After a snow gnat attack however, the children decide to take refuge in a nearby cave, where they once again meet up with Carmelita Prats and a group of Snow Scouts. In the group the Baudelaires find a valuable friend: the third Quagmire triplet! He leads them to the V.F.D Headquarters and shares some of the secrets he had learned. However, what they find is that the headquarters have been burnt down but there is still one more safe place. Meanwhile Sunny is stuck on top of the mountain doing shores for the villains. While she's there she learns some valuable information about the last safe place. In the end the Baudelaires are reunited with their friend Quigley Quagmire. The villains take the Snow Scouts captive and all goes wrong. In order to escape, the orphans decide to slide down the already melting waterfall. The waterfall melts and becomes a rushing river, where Quigley is separated from the Baudelaires and heads down the opposite river channel. Possessing only the location of the last safe place and a poem, the Baudelaires are left without a clue as to what to do. I found this book to be enjoyable and most definitely different! Lemony Snicket has a way of writing that is completely unique. The way he pushes you to no longer read the book and tells you how horrible the story is; it draws you in and makes you want to keep reading! The one thing I didn't like about the book and the previous ones is, there's a lot of advanced vocabulary that some of the younger readers may not be able to understand. Also, at points where some of the words are explained, the definitions are made to fit the situation specifically and sometimes may give an improper definition. Apart from that, the book was great. I also didn't really like the ending, but I suppose it fits considering the fact that the Baudelaires have such terrible luck. I personally would have kept Quigley with them and not have him washed away by the river! Overall, the book was an okay read. It wouldn't appeal to everyone though. It's more of a tragedy adventure and not for people who enjoy happy endings. Apart from that, if people are looking to read something different and unusual, it's definitely worth a try! In the end, I would recommend it to a selected number of people and warn them that they'll be surprised!
Date published: 2005-07-04
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ...a phenomenon... The novel The Slippery Slope is one of the ten books in the Series of Unfortunate Events series by Lemony Snicket. These books explore a genre that no other children's book has before- they are all about the terrible things that happen to children, specifically, the three children in the series: Violet, Klaus, and Sunny Baudelaire. After the children's parents were killed in a fire, the Baudelaires were placed under the guidance of Mr. Poe, a banker who always has a bad cough. Mr. Poe ships them off to various distant relatives, most of of which force them to do back-breaking, tedious jobs. The worst relative that the Baudelaires have to live with is Count Olaf. After escaping from the horrible man with a tatooed eye on his ankle in Book the First, the Baudelaires are constantly running from him, only just escaping him every time. Along the way, they meet the two Quagmire triplets and become great friends with them. However, after discovering that one of their parents may be alive, in The Slippery Slope the Baudelaires journey to the headquarters of the mysterious organization VFD to look for a sign of their parents. The Series of Unfortunate Events books are a phenomenon the likes of which the literary world has never seen. Mr. Snicket has also published various accompaniments to the series such as the (supposedly) Unauthorized Biography. The strange thing is, the Unauthorized Biography contains a jumble of secret codes and clues which add to the mystery of the Baudelaires. What is VFD? Is one of the Baudelaire's parents still alive? What does the eye symbol mean? The answers are found somewhere in the mysterious world of the Baudelaires...
Date published: 2005-07-04
Rated 3 out of 5 by from The S The Slippery Slope is about the two of the Baudelaire children (Klaus and Violet) trying to rescue there little sister Sunny from Count Olaf and his comrades. And finding out the secret of V.F.D that there friends Isadora and Duncan Quagmire found out in the Austere Academy. Isadora is a girl that is an expert at poetry and Duncan is an expert on researching stuff. Count Olaf is a villain who tries to take the Baudelaire fortune and the Quagmires sapphires and other people's fortunes but he never can. Violet is a fourteen-year-old girl that ties her hair up with a ribbon to keep it out of her eyes and think of an invention. Klaus is a fantastic reader he can read books big or small and it really comes in handy in their adventure like he read the few scraps of paper in the Slippery Slope. Sunny likes to bite things with her four sharp teeth and she just learned to walk and she can sometimes talk like drat. I think this book teaches you to protect yourself when ever you're in trouble. I like the parts when Violet comes up with her inventions so quick when they need them and I like Sunny's sharp teeth because it helps them in all sorts of trouble like in the Slippery Slope she tried to slow down the sled with her teeth when they were falling down the frozen waterfall. I dislike the parts when they start getting in trouble like going up the slippery slope to find out what Count Olaf was up to and how she hid under the car and popped the tire. This is for another ending. I think the four of them should of stayed together when they landed into the water and got to the last safe place if it is at the end of the river before Count Olaf. I think I am like Sunny Baudelaire because she likes to bite things and I like to bite things. I think people who like adventure would like this series of unfortunate events because it is like going places like the mountain, and a hospital in the hostile hospital and a village with lots of crows in the vile village. If I were to change a part of the story I would change the part when the scouts are on the hill and the snow gnats (witch is little bugs that live in the snowy white hills) would come and start attacking the eagles that carried the snow scouts away and listened to the bad guys. This book reminds me of a DVD called Over Canada where it shows you the provinces and territories of Canada and Canada has a lot of mountains with snow and ice and rock and The Grinch That Stole Christmas reminds me of Count Olaf. And that is my review I hope you enjoy it.
Date published: 2005-07-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Dare you read it? If you're looking for a pleasant book with a nice, buttercuppy ending, put this one down and run. For this is the most UNHAPPY book you could find. Dare you read it? This unfortunate story is about 3 orphans, Violet, Klaus and Sunny, who are charming and smart yet lead very sad adventures. They've been through many guardians who've all mysteriously disappeared (or the otherwise...) but now they're focusing on one thing; solving the mystery of the Snicket file and rescuing Sunny from the clutches of the evil Count Olaf, who's after their fortune. Will they finally stop Count Olaf, or is this the end of our 3 poor orphans...? I never dreamed I would like such a dismal tale--but Lemoney simply draws you into the mystery, dark humor and leaves you wondering, is this actually TRUE like he says? and leaves you hungrily waiting for more. IS the tale true? Well, you never know...
Date published: 2005-07-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from It's a 10 in my books! WOW!! Lemony Snicket has done it again! This latest book, A Series of Unfortunate Events #10, The Slippery Slope , is a real page turner! Throughout the story I was splitting my sides laughing, while at other times I was glued to the edge of my seat with suspense. In this 10th book of a fabulous series, Klaus and Violet Beaudelaire take you on an exciting (and sometimes frightening) journey to find the yougest Baudelaire, Sunny, who has been horribly kidnapped by evil villains. Throughout their search Klaus and Violet continue to seek the mysterious meaning of the infamous initials, V.F.D. and coincidently meet up with the presumed to be dead, Quigly Quagmire, the third Quagmire triplet. There are so many twists and turns to this nailbiting adventure! This story is pure enjoyment for me as it has all the elements of genre that I love, including secrets, mysteries, humour and surprises around every corner. I also liked it a lot because it wasn't the typical storyline pattern from the rest of the books in the series. I love Lemony Snicket's style of writing as it's twisted and funny! Just when you think you've figured out what will happen next, Snicket throws in another twist and builds in a whole different plot. This storyline reminds me of 2 books written by Debi Gliori, Pure Dead Magic , followed by Pure Dead Wicked . They are about 3 siblings, named Titus, Pandora, and baby sister Damp. The two series are similar, not only because they both include 2 children and a baby, but also both sets of siblings are always getting into trouble but invariably come up with ingenius ways to get out of it! I would definately recommend The Slippery Slope , as well as the rest of the Unfortunate Events series for that matter, to any kid (or even adults) who enjoys laughing and reading, because this adventure will keep you flipping the pages way past your bedtime!!! It's a 10 in my books!
Date published: 2005-07-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...they have everything!!! Hidden messages in sugar bowls, mysterious fires, evil uni-browed, hook handed, white-faced, bald villains and three orphans using their biting, inventing and (most importantly!) reading skills to stay out of unwanted trouble-Lemony Snicket has it all in his 'Series of Unfortunate Events'! The (so far) eleven books of this series are so smart, witty and funny (if not a bit depressing at times!) that by reading them over and over you will realise that you can never get bored of Lemony's excentric writing style! (The word 'excentric' used in this sentence means original, unlike any other or different, in a good way, from other author's writing styles!) It's hard to explain what types of books are in this series: adventure, comedy, mystery (?) but I think it's safe to say that if your a person who likes something (anything will do,) you'll love these books becasue they have everything!!!
Date published: 2005-07-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...a funny mystery novel... This unique book features three children who lost their parents to a fire in their home. These childrens' names are Violet, Klaus and Sunny Baudelaire. The two elder siblings, Violet and Klaus, find themselves hurtling down Mortmain Mountains, which means Deadhand Mountains. As well as trying to get their sister back, Violet and Klaus try to find the mysterious V.F.D. headquarters in hopes of finding a surviving parental unit as well. With the help from a stranger who was supposed to be dead, they fulfill both their quests. Their infant sister, Sunny, is in the hands of Count Olaf, a monstrous villain who has tried to get his filthy hands on their fortune nine times before along with nine strange accomplices. This book is a funny mystery novel. It supplies more than a detailed dictionary. I find it tiresome sometimes when he repeats things throughout the story or pauses to tell us the meaning of a word, though it sometimes is stringed together with the mysteries. I love how he uses so many different characters and they each have something special about them. I feel that Kevin, the ambidextrous, x-carnival worker, is being silly in thinking that having hands that are both equally strong is bad. No one would be able to tell unless he told them. This book would appeal to anyone who has a good sense of humour or who is sick of reading those happy books where everything ends out with the problem solved and everything ends mindlessly happy and well. I am very excited to see the turnout of the movie based on The Series of Unfortunate Events. I am sure that Jim Carrey will be a very good Count Olaf.
Date published: 2005-06-30
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...a way with words... Have you ever heard of a vampire-fanged baby? How about a book -crazed 12-year-old? Nope? Well Then you've never of heard of a teenage inventor name violet and her younger brother Klaus and youngest sister sunny! These three siblings have made my throat into an apple sized knot several times since there first adventure after their parents died in a blazing fire destroying their home and all of their belongings. In the tenth book of the series, The Slippery Slope, Snicket recounts the tragic adventures of the 3's evil money crazed Uncle (who is trying to get his hands on their inheritance) trying to murder two of the trio and, kidnapping Sunny, pushes them down a mountain slide in a run away trolley to their gruesome death. I don't know about you, but the time I had finished this very twisted novel, I had my once long and polished nails to a mire stub! Lemony Snicket has a way with words that will make EVERYONE want to read his series!
Date published: 2005-06-30
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...a mesmerizing book... Lemony Snicket, once again, has written a mesmerizing book that will blow your mind away. The main thing I like about this book is the determination that Quigley Quamire had to survive a fire. One thing I didn't really enjoy is when the baby spoke in baby talk and how she had to be translated everytime. One character I related to in this book was Klause Baudelaire because he enjoys reading a lot of books, starting at a very young age, just like me. I would consider this book as a tragedy, but at the same time, it can be categorized as a mystery. I would definitely recommend this book for people who are not afraid to read something new and different, and someone who would like to be fully intrigued into a captivating plot. Everybody, get out of the house and grab this amazing book!
Date published: 2005-06-30
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...surprising, unexpected, and unfortunate... This suspenseful, delightful, and somewhat frightful book will keep you on the edge of your stool, or fire pit, or wherever you happen to be reading Lemony Snicket's The Slippery Slope. The tenth chapter in A Series of Unfortunate Events, this is by far the author's most insightful indulging into the lives of the Baudelaire orphans yet. This story begins, of course, where The Carnivorous Carnival left off: with Violet and Klaus, the two elder Baudelaire children, zooming backwards down a cliff side in a caravan, and Sunny trapped in the clutches of the villainous Count Olaf and his associates. The story continues in the same fashion as the first nine books, which make up the series of unfortunate events that the Baudelaires have faced. Every time Violet and her siblings get themselves into a sticky, (or in this case, slippery) situation, she uses her famous inventing skills to get them out of it. If Violet or Sunny happen to come by a word or fact or figure they don't understand the meaning of, they can always turn to their brother Klaus, who will no doubt have come across the answer in a book he read. And of course, Sunny and her sharp teeth always come in handy. In this story, the Baudelaire orphans struggle to understand the true meaning of V.F.D., find out if one of their parents may have survived the fire that destroyed the Baudelaire mansion, and of course, rescue Sunny from the evil Count Olaf. The Slippery Slope shows the return of a rather unpleasant character, whom I personally hoped would never show her ungrateful face again. Let me give you a hint as to who this might be. If she saw you walking towards her, she might say, Who are you? You look like a cakesniffer to me! even though you are probably a very pleasant person just wishing to say hello or ask for directions to the nearest prison. Another character is also introduced, a relation of the Quaugmire triplets, who was believed to have perished in a fire. The introduction of these characters and others has shown me, for the first time, that the series of events that make up the lives of the Baudelaire orphans are not only unfortunate, but also unexpected. If you are the kind of person who likes to read, and I mean really likes to read (because you won't be able to put this book down), then this is the book for you. If you like things to be surprising, unexpected, and unfortunate, than this is definitely the book for you. Now, Lemony Snicket may advise you otherwise, but it is his duty to warn you, just as it is his duty to record the details of the Baudelaire orphans lives. He may tell you that it is most certainly not your duty to read his book, and I tell you, as an honest and faithful reader, that it is worth it to do so anyway.
Date published: 2005-06-30
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...fresh with excitement... Lemony Snicket is a BRILLIANT writer! He makes the book so intriguing that you can't put it down! The book is so good that it actually pulls you into the story. It's of survival with only Violet and her siblings living through life as an orphan. What Lemony did that made it so interesting is that he didn't put down a date of the year but instead he kept it a mystery. He keeps the books very fresh with excitement so that you really want to keep on reading because it's so great. What often happens to me when I read a good book at night is that I don't want to stop reading. This was one of those books. Lemony Snicket writes in a VERY interesting way that rarely authors do write in. I've read every single book he's written because they all have a mysterious ring to them. Count Olaf is an interesting character that sometimes takes the spotlight from the Baudelaires. I can't imagine what it would feel like to be an orphan! Lemony has a smart mind to write a book like that. I'd recommend this book to anyone! The book is a real rollercoaster ride. One day the Baudelaires are free and the other day they're caught by Count Olaf. It definetly has it's ups and downs. This book is a great summer book because it is a long book and it will captivate very bored minds that have nothing to do. You almost feel sympathectic for the characters it's so intriguing. There are alot of emotions. Like: Madness, Sadness, Happiness, Frightfulness... I think everyone ages ten and up shoud read this great, wonderful and exciting book. He makes the characters have bold personalitys like Sunny's. She loves to chew on EVERYTHING and she can be very feisty. Her's definetly stands out loud and clear. I give this book a four and a half rating out of the five star rating! It is becuase Lemony Snicket Makes the book stand on all four feet and show them what he's got!
Date published: 2005-06-30
Rated 5 out of 5 by from The Slippery Slope I think this book stands in its own category; it's not like any other book that I've read. It was kind of a suspense/drama type of book, it keep me wanting more. I extremely like the way Lemony Snicket writes, he's like telling it the way it is, he doesn't write like other authors. I don't think I dislike anything from his books except that they have to end. I would recommend this book to people who like sad stories and kind of reality types of book. I can not wait till his next book named the grim groto comes out in stores.
Date published: 2005-06-30
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...highly entertaining and engaging... After I read book the ninth in the Unfortunate Events series, I was worried that Lemony Snicket was running out of steam. The formula was on the verge of becoming unbearably stale and Snicket's wit was burning out. I don't like to leave books unfinished so I read it through, but my disapointment in The Carniverous Carnival was enough to make me hesitant to pick up book the tenth, The Slippery Slope . I still had faith in the series so I read it and found Lemony Snicket's writing had gained freshness and maturity (as well as a veiled political reference or two), and I the book proved to be the most enjoyable in the series so far. With secrets of the V.F.D. unfolding, Count Olaf coming closer to following through with his dastardly plan, and more trouble facing the Baudelaires, the pages of this highly entertaining and engaging book seemed to turn themselves as I worried about the fate of the eldest Baudelaires barreling down a mountain in a runaway caravan, or Sunny, in the clutches of Count Olaf and his viallanous associates, and found that not unlike a Hydra's heads, each question answered posed at least three more. I became frantic as I ran out of pages to read and chances to have my questions answered. At the last page I was left feeling fulfilled but at the same time full of questions. I'm eagerly anticipating book 11 and in the meantime I'd recommend anybody with a fairly dark sense of humour, as well as everybody else, to read this book.
Date published: 2005-06-30
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...remarkable book... Have you ever tobogganed down a frozen waterfall, slept in a covered casserole dish, or solved a secret code in a refrigerator, all while being taught what really matters in life? Just in case you haven't, or even if you have, Lemony Snicket has written a book just for you. This remarkable book, The Slippery Slope, is the tenth volume in Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events. It follows the bizarre adventures of the three Beaudelaire orphans, Violet, Klaus, and Sunny. When the book opens, Violet and Klaus are hurtling down the steep slopes of the Mortmain Mountains, while Sunny, the baby, is riding up them with the villainous Count Olaf. Violet and Klaus must trek up the mountains to rescue Sunny from Olaf's evil clutches. They are also searching for the headquarters of the V.F.D, a mysterious organization that somehow might be able to help them. Snicket has a unique writing style. He tells the reader repeatedly not to read any farther because his story is likely to make you feel lonely, miserable, and in need of help. (pg. 2) He knows that you will be unable to resist this challenge, and will continue to read. Snicket also provides entertainment in the way of strange, but accurate, analogies and definitions. For example, he defines a centrepiece as a decoration placed in the middle of a table, often used to distract people from the food. (pg. 118) So, as miserable as the story may be, it is impossible not to laugh. Lemony Snicket expects his audience to be very well-read, and he explains constantly how much easier it is to trust a well-read person. There are numerous subtle literary references buried in the story, including those to Tolstoy and Swinburne. However, you don't need a love of Russian literature to enjoy the book. It's a great story for anyone to read. It's difficult to relate to the characters in The Slippery Slope, but you find yourself wishing that you could. Their unique skills and personalities can be admired by anyone. There's Violet, a genius inventor; Klaus, a talented researcher; Sunny, a baby chef; and Quigley, a clever mapmaker. The most amazing thing about these characters is that they're all children! Snicket had embedded his life philosophies in his novel. He encourages us to value and to work with the unique strengths of an individual. He also offers a warning: If everyone fought fire with fire, the entire world would go up in smoke. (pg. 272) And it's that kind of message that really leaves me thinking. The only thing about this book that I would change would be simply to provide a little bit more background information. There are so many references to the previous books in the series that a short review of them would be appropriate. Lemony Snicket has packed this book so full of inspiring characters, philosophical reflections, and unique analogies that it would be impossible to find someone to whom The Slippery Slope wouldn't appeal.
Date published: 2005-06-30
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...thrilling series... In this thrilling series full of twists and turns the author Lemony Snicket uses his full capabilities and shows us that no matter how horrible our lives are someone else's is always worse (especially the Baudilares). He shows us his unendable creativity with his evil character, Count Olaf and his masterful disguises. As for the three Baudilares, they have unique characteristics like Violet's inventive brain thinking of ways to invent new gizmos, to get his sibblings and her out of trouble, klaus' infinite knowledge that he uses no matter where he goes, and Sunny who uses her dagger-like teeth to protect her sibblings when in trouble and uses her baby talk as a code. Lemony Snicket once again keeps us in suspense with this amazing misterous and adventerous novel. I love this book and recommend it to kids who have just began reading novels to expert readers as well.
Date published: 2005-06-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...you HAVE to read more... A fabulous read! This book is like dim sum! It has many different and interesting flavours. In this action-packed, suspenseful, and mysterious book, everything leads down to one very important question: What is VFD? This book will have you asking & answering questions all the way thorough. Once you have read one of Snickets books, you HAVE to read more. Authour Lemony Snicket has done it again; that is, he has pulled his readers into the world of orphans Violet, Klaus and Sunny Baudelaire. When the three talented siblings are separated from each other by the evil Count Olaf, the must use their intelligence, knowledge, and gut to brave the perilous Mortmain Mountains, save Sunny, and find VFD! I enjoyed reading this book because it kept me in suspense. It kept me worried about Sunny, and curious. I thought What next? through practically the whole story. I loved that I was drawn into the book, that I was no longer in my library, but in the mountains with the Baudelaires. There was nothing that I didn't like in the book, it blew me away! I would not change a thing. I would recommend this book to those who like a story to keep them on their toes, that is full of mystery, surprises, action and suspense. As the words in the book tend to be difficult, I would recommend ages 9-10+. Whilst waiting for the next Harry Potter, read The Slippery Slope. It is MARVELOUS!!
Date published: 2005-06-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...gripping tale... Does hurtling down a mountain road in a runaway caravan sound like your idea of fun? What if you factor in an evil villain, bent on stealing your family fortune? Still no fun? Well for the three Baudelaire orphans, this has become commonplace and continues into the tenth installment of A Series of Unfortunate Events: The Slippery Slope. In this gripping tale, we find the trio still searching for answers to the many questions which have surrounded them since the death of their parents. As they piece together the puzzle, they discover it is a mystery, wrapped in an enigma. I recommend reading this novel if for no other reason than, the perverse joy one gains when reading about another, whose life is more unfortunate than your own. In this unique piece of childrens' literature, the author, Lemony Snicket, offers to kids a direct contrast to most books, a foil to the happy-go-lucky approach taken by many others. Instead he ventures forth on the road less traveled, and it proves to be a smashing success. Although several grim events occur within the pages of this series, it does not intimidate the reader, and rather provides comfort to them with the realization that their own life is not bad after all. In the tenth of the series, we re-encounter many characters that we met in the previous books; some who many of us would prefer to have remained in the pages of the preceding tales. What stands out most in this novel is the increased involvement of the narrator, as a pivotal character, in the events occurring in this unique novel. Lemony Snicket appears now not only as a definer of phrases, an explainer of places, or as foreboding presence, but as a central character who interacts with the individuals, and the environments that the Baudelaires find themselves forced to reckon with. In this way, the book takes on a more personal quality, and the reader feels as though they are hearing a secret that only they know. Aside from the fact that this book was both intriguing and suspenseful, it also holds some educational merit. For within each trial and tribulation that the three face, we find facts and words that help us to become more articulate (It has been my personal experience that improving your vocabulary never fails to impress your English teacher). While other books may serve their academic lessons in a dry, tedious manner, The Slippery Slope delivers it in a comical, whimsical, and satirical fashion. The Slippery Slope is a tale that the reader can easily lose them self in. As soon as you open the book, you become swept up in each treacherous adventure that the Baudelaires embark upon, and you will not be able to put it down until the final page. This book is suited for anyone who is looking for a departure from the ordinary, and an escape from the mundane. It is truly an adventure that you won't want to miss.
Date published: 2005-06-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...my most favourite... This book is on of the best books i've ever read! I've read all 10 of lemony snickets unfortunate events, and each one left me guessing to the end.One day i picked up one of lemony snickets novels, expecting it to be boring and horrible.You can't believe how wrong I was!It was the exact oppissite.The slippery slope is my most favourite of them all.It was exciting and wonderful, but kinda sad at the same time.He's whole series is about 3 orphans who's dead parents left behind a fourtune for them.In every novel they go from place to place, trying to escape the cluches of the greedy villian Count Olaf,who in each book tries a different sceme to steal there fortune.Lemony snicket is one of my favourite authors, and I'd recamond his stories for preteens from 9 ,to teenagers of all ages.Mabye some adults too.The slippery slop is a great novel, and i suggest everyone go out and read.
Date published: 2005-06-29
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ...slow moving... I waited for this book with the greatest patience I could muster. I put my name on the Calgary public library's waiting list for 6 months and when I did get it, I felt it was a waste of time. Upon reading it, the reader must get the right frame of mind and sometimes the book can be quite senseless. There are a lot of villains and the characters are some times hard to relate to. I feel that Lemony Snicket has lost his touch and that the Series Of Unfortunate Events started off great but gradually lost its lust . The book is however is very interesting and is full of suspense. Basically it keeps you on your toes the whole way, though sometimes the book can be quite slow moving. Especially when they are traveling. I think that the choice of characters' personalities were spectacular. With Violet's inventive brain and Klaus' smart one, they make quite a match. Sunny is cute and makes a nice twist to the story though not much use in the big scheme of things. I would recommend this book fore readers 8-10 years of age for good readers. All in all the book was quite good but the first ones were better (in my opinion)! I hope that Lemony Snicket keeps writing more books just make them more fast paced with more action!
Date published: 2005-06-29
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ...lackluster plot... The Slippery Slope is an intriguing book about the journeys of three orphans called the Baudelaires trying to escape from the clutches of an evil man named Count Olaf, but the Baudilaires soon realize that the conniving Count is not thier only problem. Perhaps the worst part about The Slippery Slope is the lackluster plot in the story. The author seems to go off on a tangent at every possible opportunity, oftentimes switching the focus from the Baudilaire orphans to something that is apparently happening in the author's personal life. For example, during chapter 6 Lemony Snicket attemps to convince the reader that the remainder of the chapter is very boring and that you should in fact skip it or abandon the book altogether, because it is apparently so woeful that you should avoid reading the book at all costs. Snicket then repeats the same sentance ( The Baudelaires journey up the Vertcal Flame Diversion was so dark and treacherous that it's not enough to write ) about four or five times. Snicket then writes a letter that's apparently adressed to his sister. This is very irritating, because the letter clearly had very little to do with the plot. This book would definately appeal to a younger audience, because the author insists on defining almost every remotely complicated word in the book to make sure the reader knows what's going on. For example: But [Sunny] had a history of perfoming Herculean tasks, a phrase which here means `managing to do incredibly difficult things.' As I'm sure you know, if you are ever forced to do something very difficult, it often helps to think about of somethiing inspiring to keep you going. I found that defining a word in the middle of the story was quite irritating and i would much prefer to see this kind of thing in a glossary instead. However, I think that Lemony Snicket did an exceptional job describing the characters in the book and at parts I felt like I was connected to the characters in the book and experiencing thier trials and tribulations along with them. In conclusion I think that this book would appeal to a younger audience because it's full of action and the characters are well thought up, but an older reader may get bored with the constant repition and mediocre plot.
Date published: 2005-06-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...riveting, mysterious plot... As a dedicated student and an avid reader, it is my personal opinion that the best way to judge a book is by questioning first how much you enjoyed it, then how much you learned from reading it. I can quite confidently say that anyone with a sense of humor, regardless of their age, would laugh as hard as I did while reading Lemony Snicket's novel The Slippery Slope, or indeed any of the novels in the Series of Unfortunate Events. But what could an adult or teen possibly learn from this books that are so clearly meant for younger readers? Far more than I had first imagined. The most prominent lesson these novels opened my eyes to was simply the art of literature. I've read everything from Anna Karenina to The DaVinci Code, and I greatly respect the power and beauty of words. However, Lemony Snicket (whoever he really is, is a genius who puts words to uses I've never seen before. The level of creativity displayed here is as different from any other book I've read as Michelangelo's art is from that of Salvador Dali. Now if you're thinking that this is too great praise for any children's literature and that my taste is juvenile, all I can say is, read it yourself. I do not deny that this book is geared towards children, and I wouldn't even say that I liked it in spite of that. I liked it because it was geared towards a younger audience. The basic novel is simple and hilarious in a completely original way, and even has a riveting, mysterious plot that runs through the entire series. However, there's so much hidden for the adults, it has so many different levels. For example, how he defines all big words, but makes the definitions slightly wonky so as to amuse those who already know the meaning. Even how baby Sunny Baudelaire's dialogue must be translated, but how in many cases her baby-talk has meaning in French or Latin. Elements like his hilarious analogies, and how he weaves his themes into them. There are also smaller jokes, like the fact that every book has thirteen chapters, and his dedications to Beatrice. These are just a few examples of Lemony Snicket's ingenuity, and why I enjoyed this novel and the entire Series of Unfortunate Events. If you feel the need to justify your purchase, buy it for a child, but I highly recommend that you also find an excuse to read it allowed, or sneak it when they're not looking, and enjoy it yourself.
Date published: 2005-06-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...captivates the imagination... Imagine yourselves in a caravan speeding down the Mortmain Mountains coming ever closer to the terrible fate of falling off the peak of the mountain or into the strangley black coloured Stricken Stream. This is the perdicament in which Violet and Klaus Baldelaire find themselves in while their sister Sunny is in an equally terrible perdicament. Travelling in the oppisate direction up to the top of the Mortmain Moutains in the car of the scheming Count Olaf and his netoriuos girlfriend Esme' Squalor. You can't help but feel sorry for the Bauderlaire orphans whos lives have just been one unforunate event to the next. Lemony Snicket has once again written a book which captivates the imagination of readers of all ages. A book full of secret, mystery an suspence.
Date published: 2005-06-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...awesome... I thought this book was awesome. I find this series really makes you think about all that is good and all that is bad in the world. The series follows the three Baudlaire orphans after their parents were killed in a fire that destroyed their home in the first book. Mr. Poe (the family's banker) is trusted with the responsibility of finding the children's new guardian. First is Count Olaf (a distant relative) takes care of them in book one, then Uncle Monty (who isn't their uncle) takes care of them in book two, and so on and so forth. This book follows immediately after the ninth book where they escape the Caligari Carnival in a desperate search for the youngest Baudelaire, Sunny. The only thing that changes about the characters through the series is Sunny starts to talk, Klaus (the middle child) turns 13 in book nine, and Violet (the oldest) improves her amazing inventing skills. Through out this book the two children must overcome obstacles in order to be united with their little sister once again. The two go through a series of emotions and events, which I find makes it all the more intriguing. I find this book is very well written and the sense the author writes with helps keep you interested. The only thing I DIDN'T like was when Carmelita Spats (a former (and very rude) classmate) joined Count Olaf. Two evils joined together, I can't wait for book 11. I would recommend this book to anyone who likes sad stories seeing as this book is very much so.
Date published: 2005-06-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...a slippery end! Violet, Klaus, and Sunny barely had time to adjust to their new title ˜The Baudelaire Orphans when they were thrown into an elaborate, ill-fated adventure, which commenced when they had received disturbing news concerning the death of their parents. Things got much worse after that when they were placed under special care of a pernicious, baleful guardian , known as Count Olaf, who had long deserted his theatrical career in hopes of swiping his filthy, greedy hands on the Baudelaire fortune. Only will the Baudelaire Children survive in this dilemma if they cooperate and work as a team, using Violet's failsafe inventions, Klaus' vast vocabulary skills, and the power of Sunny's sharp teeth. This story opens with Klaus and Violet in a caravan tumbling dangerously down the Mortmain Mountains, and slipping away from the secret headquarters of V.F.D that they had discovered on a secret map. Using their gifted skills, they were able to escape the exigency- which is a fancy word for crisis - that would have taken their lives. Now full of exhaustion, and determination, they set off to the summit of Mortmain Mountains praying they would be reunited with one possible survivor of the ˜terrible fire which had changed their very lives, rescue Sunny, who is, presently, held hostage by Count Olaf in a covered casserole dish, and uncover the secret of VFD. Their journey up the mountains became difficult when they had to confront a large swarm of violent snow gnats, and when they ate nothing but marshmallows for dinner. The time when they encountered a villain who appeared to be more malevolent than that of Count Olaf was just as unfortunate. An unanticipated survivor of a fire appeared, and nonsensical pledges vowed- what more can you expect!? The richest installment of the Series of Unfortunate Events yet, and with each chapter written, Lemony Snicket polishes the story with loads of troubles, dark secrets, and surprising revelations; only to result in a slippery end! This book will certainly appeal to people who are all for laughing, and for the on-going tension, which is the only thing which makes this book STICK! It would probe your heart, rocks your senses, and show you it's not the faint-hearted..the hard way!
Date published: 2005-06-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...the most unfortunate of all... The book I reviewed is called 'A Series of Unfortunate Events: The Slippery Slope' by Lemony Snicket. It is the tenth book in its' series, and perhaps the most unfortunate of all, as the Baudelaire children go to a slippery mountain, find more clues which may lead to their reunion with their parent(s) (if any of them survived that dreadful fire). However, so far they are still looking for more clues on the 'slippery slope', while they almost lose their baby sister, Sunny to Count Olaf and his crew. In my opinion, this is a really great book/series to read, especially if you are into mystery, suspense, adventure, and of course, reading about unfortunate events. However, I only have one small complaint about this book. It is how every other paragraph, Lemony Snicket has to talk about how the story relates to his life, or how unfortunate the children must be. Other than that, I would highly reccommend this book to kids 9-16. I loved this book beginning, middle, and end, and even if I could change the story, I would keep it the way it is. This book/series is truly unique, and I can't wait for the movie coming to theatres this Christmas. I hope after reading this review, you will pick up this book and start reading, whether or not you have read it before, as it is one of the best books ever published!
Date published: 2005-06-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...uncover the mystery... I remember when I first started reading ASOUE (A Series of Unfortunate Events) . The first few books were similair. Orphans would move, the count would find them (in one of his many disguises) and would slowly reveal his fiendish plans. That was fine with me, as Lemony Snicket would incorperate his witty humour and creativity into the many predicaments the orphans would find themselves in. And then things got interesting. Slowly a plot was uncovered involving the mysterious V.F.D. More characters were introduced such as the Quagmire triplets and Esme Squalor. You find yourself wanting to know more, wanting to uncover the mystery, so in response he makes it more complex and deepens the mystery. His latest book keeps up to his reputation. It has very witty humour and is very clever in its story telling. I particularly like his style of writing and story telling. A great example is Sunnys personal language- Brummell' which meant 'in my opinion, you desperately need a bath and your clothing is a shambles . The Author uses a sophistacated style of writing and translates in to baby language. If I could have changed one thing, I would have the Baudlairs spend more time together. It loses the everyone-uses-their-skills-to-solve-their-predicament feel when they are apart. The book had a classic ASOUE ending where just as things are looking like they might be alright, the Baudelaires get seperated from their friends and left in a seemingly hopeless predicament where they find themselves once again on thier own. I have a friend who also enjoys this series, who commented that the Spiderwick Chronicles are similair. I have yet to try them. Also, a ASOUE movie is coming out. I have high hopes. This book would appeal to an audience with a good sense of humour. I can not personaly relate it to any book I have read, sense it is extremly unique. Lemony Snicket forges a new path in book genres and suceeds in doing so.
Date published: 2005-06-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...a great series... This book makes a lot of sense. I think it's neat how Lemony Snicket made it so they use everyday items to solve their problems.They didn't just Heroicly jumped out of the caravan at the last second. The calmed down and used their brains. I like that. I also think that Lemony Snicket should have told how the Volenteers Made the Vertical Flame Diversion as well as how they got the pole out. Also Klaus found a piece of information from the library and he said it was almost set so it didn't get burnt. Lemony never answered that. When Violet and Quigley climbed the waterfall Lemony Snicket stayed out of their privacy as if they were going to kiss. How does Lemony know this? He wasn't there. And if he was they shouldn't leave it out of the book. Good readers like a book where just about everything is answered.And how did Lemony know what the two evil villians with a terrifying aura looked like?He wasn't there either! And the eagles and reptiles Lemony never said anything about that! All in all I think this is a great series. Keep going Lemony! I have one tip or Request. He should explain EVERYTHING! Thank you for your time.
Date published: 2005-06-29
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ...getting rather tired.. I have to say that I am getting rather tired of the constant string of unfortunate events that befall the Beaudelaire orphans. The only good thing that happens in this book floats away down a river! In this book Klaus and Violet are trying to get Sunny back from the clutches of Count Olaf. The Count has Sunny travelling with him and his silly friends and girlfriend. During the journey up a mountain Klaus and Violet meet some characters that have appeared in previous books. The Baudelaires spend the rest of the book trying to rescue Sunny from Count Olaf's Mountain lair. Eventually they suceed in rescuing Sunny. This happy event however, is ruined when they lose their new found friend who ends up floating down the river.
Date published: 2005-06-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...a true masterpiece... Lemony Snicket has created a true masterpiece that will leave you hanging in suspense. After you've started the book it is very hard to put it down, you'll read a page and need to find out what happens next all the time. Lemony Snicket and the Baudelaire Children will take you to the worst situations in the most outrageous places imaginable. Including a mountain swarming with gnats and explored by an overly happy group of scouts. In this book you will meet someone who you would least expect in the least expected place, but just when you think every things going to turn out alright for the Baudelaire children for once things take a turn for the worst (you will have to read it to find out I not going to tell you everything). The series itself will leave you stunned at how the Baudelaire children manage to have such bad luck in there lives. But one of the most amazing things is how stupid some of the people around them can be, for instance Mr. Poe the banker and person in charge of the Baudelaire's fortune and finding the children a home. No matter what the children tell him he never believes them, which is always a big part of the problem. So I write you this hoping that you yourself will read these books and find out the amazing yet sad life story of the Baudelaire children.
Date published: 2005-06-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...it has everything... I'm telling you! This book is amazing; it has everything: A mystery, an ingenious plot, and an ending that makes you hungry for more. Lemony writes about three very happy children who are ripped away from their family as their house burns down to the ground with their parents. They are sent to a relative, Count Olaf, to raise them. They find out that he is a greedy man seeking the Baudelaires fortune. In this book the Baudelaire triplets try to find out what Count Olaf knows about the secret organization VFD. Many twists are on their way, so better read the book than listen to me telling you about it. Lemony's books are always there to make me smile (or cry ). I learned two important things from Slippery Slope: First, when in trouble rely on friendship, caring, and sometimes fate. Last, if a stranger walks into your house, just remember to look for those shiny shiny eyes.
Date published: 2005-06-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from I loved the ending... Violet, Klause, and Sunny are back in the tenth book from The Series of Unfortunate Events ! The Slippery Slope by Lemony Snicket is an exciting, fast-paced book with plenty of bizarre,but interesting, events. In this book, Violet and Klaus encounter some unusual situations up in the Mortmain Mountains in a desperate attempt to save their sister Sunny from the greedy hands of Count Olaf and his evil girlfriend Esme. Can Violet and Klause overcome these obstacles with the help of a survivor of a disastrous fire? Read The Slippery Slope to find out! There isn't one thing I would want to change about this book, which is one of the reasons I liked it so much. The uniqueness of this book, and all of the other books in this series, makes it a great read for any readers who like books that are different and can make you laugh, or books that are intense and can make you sit on the edge of your seat, waiting to see what will happen next. There was nothing I didn't like about this book. I loved the ending in this book because it just leaves you hanging. I can't wait to read the next book in the series! This book didn't remind me of any other book I have ever read before, or any TV show or movie I have ever seen before and I like that. So, if you're in need of a quick, fun read, check this book out! Don't forget to read the first nine in the series too! They'll keep you reading and laughing for a while!
Date published: 2005-06-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...nothing comes close... The Slippery Slope is an excellent book. It is the longest yet of the books in Lemony Snicket's, Series of Unfortunate Events , as well as my favourite out of all nine. I was always turning the pages, unable to wait for what might come next. This book is suspenseful, but humorous as well. Lemony Snicket has a way of doing that well. I've read books before that tried to make it suspenseful as well have something for a bit of a laugh, but nothing comes close to Mr. Snicket's unique style. The beginning, as usual, starts off with the authour trying to persuade you to not read the book. Few books I have read (and believe me, I've read many) do something like that. It's one of the things that makes you curious, which practically puts you under a spell- it seems like you can't put the book down. The next part of the book kind of scared me. I really thought that Violet and Klaus, who were in a caravan going down the Mortmain Mountain, were going to go over the edge of a cliff. But, of course, if they did, it wouldn't be much of a story anymore, now would it? My favourite part of the story was a bit later, when Violet and Klaus go into a cave to escape to snow gnats- and find the Snow Scouts. There is also someone else there, in a white sweater. The Baudelaires don't learn until later that he is Quigley Quagmire, the third Quagmire triplet, but he knows about the V.F.D. (which can stand for many things), and therefore, they believe he is on their side. There was a part I didn't like as much. As Violet and Quigley climbed up a frozen waterfall in the mountains, they stop for a rest. At one point, it says, I will take this opportunity to give them a bit of privacy, by not writing down anything more of what happened between these two friends. It was okay, but it made me really wonder. Also, some people might take it the wrong way, so I think there should have been a bit more detail here. Perhaps, what he could've said would be something like, They sat there in silence, and I will take this opportunity and so on. All in all, this was a good book. Violet and Klaus went on quite an adventure- narrowly escaping death, climbing up the Vertical Flame Diversion, finding the remains of the V.F.D. headquarters. And their younger sister, Sunny? Like the fairy tale, Cinderella, she was forced to work for Count Olaf. Will everything be all right for the Baudelaires and the Quagmires? Although I thought The Slippery Slope would be the last book, it isn't. I can't wait for the next book, so I can read more of the Baudelaire's journeys!
Date published: 2005-06-27
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...something here for everyone... Do you enjoy books that leave you with a warm feeling and a fairy tale ending? Then A Series of Unfortunate Events - The Slippery Slope may not be for you. Violet Baudelaire along with her younger brother Klaus, must manage climbing the Mortmain Mountains in order to find V.F.D headquarters, a possible survivor of a terrible fire, and an opportune moment to save their little sister - Sunny. Count Olaf, (being the Baudelaire's former foster father,) along with his comrades have captured Sunny and intend on keeping her until they can steal her family fortune. Sunny is treated like Cinderella - only worse, being forced to cook the troupes meals and do all of the chores! (In utterly insane ways.) On their way to the peak of the mountain, Violet and Klaus encounter some difficult decisions. Should they trust an oddly clothed person? Is it all right to trick the enemy, even if it's for the greater good? Are some questions better left unanswered? Lemony Snicket; the author of this book, seems to be constantly disapproving of it, saying that it's something well suited to be thrown into a pit rather than read. I for one could not disagree more. The plot develops quite quickly and with many captivating twists and turns, making it an absolutely absorbing read. I did notice that a theme of orphans being hunted by fiends is becoming common with the likes of Harry Potter by J.K.Rowling, as well as some other not as well know books such as Wolves of Willoughby Chase by Joan Aiken. In ways it's very easy to identify with the three Baudelaire orphans. If you have an inventive mind, a knack for research, or are not able to be understood in the best of situations then you may have more in common with them than you think. I felt that this novel did not only tell a story of a series of events which happen to be unfortunate, but also that even when you feel alone in the world, and that you think everyone is out to get you, you will always find those special people who make you feel like you belong. It would be wonderful to eventually see Violet, Klaus, and Sunny finally fool their frightful excuse of a father Olaf and live without his loathing, but other than that upturn in the plot I would not change anything in this book, because it's perfect as it is, and if it was different - I along with many others may have taken Snicket's advice and thrown it into the nearest trash receptacle upon finding. Luckily I didn't throw it away and I find this is the perfect book for reading anytime- though I recommend not just before you intend on going to sleep because you wont be able to put it down! There truly is something here for everyone, mystery, romance, comedy, adventure, and even a few recipes for the experimental cook. Enjoy and good eating! I mean, reading.
Date published: 2005-06-27
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ...a good way to pass the time... The Slippery Slope is the tenth book in A Series Of Unfortunate Events, written by Lemony Snicket. The book centres on the three Baudelaire orphans, Violet, Claus and Sunny, and the tragic events they have to face after the death of their parents, and how they must protect their fortune from the evil Count Olaf. In this book they come closer to finding out the secret of V.F.D. (Volunteer Fire Department) by figuring out a multitude of codes, and tricking Count Olaf. The author, Lemony Snicket, has many signature writing styles, such as making analogies that bring no further understanding to the story. In the first nine books of the series this style is often amusing, but by the tenth book I find myself wishing he would stop interrupting the flow of the book. He also likes to insist the reader should stop reading, and instead find a book with a happier ending. However, reverse psychology doesn't work in a book, and this simply caused more interruptions in the plot, without bringing anything to the story. Lemony Snicket, despite his odd tendencies, is quite adept at character development. Many authors tend to forget that the characters are getting older as the story progresses, but Lemony Snicket does a wonderful job of incorporating the ways they change as people as the go through such unfortunate events. This quality reminded me of Philip Pullman's book, The Amber Spyglass. The character development was exceptional in both, and they were able to make a connection with the reader, through the characters in the book. The ending left me a little disappointed. Unlike Lemony Snicket's other books, where the ending left the reader with an idea of the next adventure of the Baudelaire orphans, this ending is rather weak. There isn't anything to compel you to read the next book in the series, which is essential in a long succession of books. I would recommend this book to a younger age category, from 9 to 14. The story is interesting enough to hold their attention, but isn't too complex for younger children to understand. Also, the analogies and insistences to stop reading the book might seem funny to a younger audience, while an older age group would find them tiresome. If you enjoy mystery, adventure, and reading about the trials and tribulations of characters, then this is a good way to pass the time.
Date published: 2005-06-27
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A thrilling and chilling tale... Lemony Snicket has gifted us with his captivating novels of the Baudelaire children since 1999 and The Slippery Slope is no exception to his collection. A thrilling and chilling tale where Violet, Klaus and Sunny find themselves once again in a slippery situation with Count Olaf and his hench men. Throughout the novel, the unfortunate orphans find a series of clues and secrets, which prove to be frustrating and will take all of their intellect and bravery to decipher the mystery behind them. Readers will especially love the twist of romance between one of the Baudelaire children that the author has provided us for the first time in his series. This reviewer particularly felt a sense of anxiety and compelling interest from this novel as Violet and Klaus fought their way through snow gnats, snow scouts and snowy mountains to reach their sister Sunny and the secretive V.F.D headquarters. Although as Violet and Klaus Baudelaire, make their way up the distressing mountains the youngest sibling finds herself a servant, no, more likely a slave to Count Olaf, his fashion frantic girlfriend Esme Squalor, and their hench men. Cooking, cleaning and sleeping in a pot is what Sunny has to look forward to during her stay with Olaf and his troupe. Sadly, like every book in the Series of Unfortunate Events, The Slippery Slope ends with a sorrowful yet suspenseful cliffhanger ending that will lead up to Book the Eleventh of the Snicket series. This novel is recommend to anyone who loves an enthralling read of a sad story filled with mystery, anxiety, adventure and a hint of romance. Fans who love The Slippery Slope cannot wait until Lemony Snicket's next magnum opus or work of art. People who read this book also found A Series of Unfortunate Events One through Nine a good read.
Date published: 2005-06-27
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...a winning combination... The author himself tells us that the book is unpleasant, distressing, miserable, and unnerving, words, which here mean funny, adventurous, hilarious, captivating, and comedic. Oh yeah, did I mention funny? Although some may argue that the books are too repetitive (Violet invents something, Klaus remembers something important from a book he read, and Sunny uses her unnatural biting power to accomplish a goal), but it seems to be a winning combination. The lack of inventiveness is completely made of for and surpassed by the wonderful, ever-present, humour that, I feel, is the essence of the entire series. The plot too, mainly in the later books, has become quite complicated with many unfinished, intertwined threads. Lemony Snicket has completely snared me, and I have to keep reading to see how the threads will be woven together in the end. This latest instalment of the Baudelaire children find Klaus and Violet separated from their baby sister Sunny, who is in the hands of the evil Count Olaf, his troupe, and his girlfriend Esme Squalor. As they seek to reunite with each other they run into a person long thought dead, a burnt down headquarters, and more mysterious and confusing clues in respects to V.F.D. and their parents. This is a wonderful book and even the author information and the dedication are very humorous (admittedly, to find the book funny, it takes a certain sense of humour, and if one lacks this they may not like the book at all). I would recommend this to anyone who likes a good laugh, but also previous reading in The Series of Unfortunate Events would be preferable.
Date published: 2005-06-27
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...great author... This book is awsome! It keeps the reader intrested all the time. With the twists and turns in the book the reader feels like he or she is in the book. Leamony Snicket is a great author and his books are enjoyable to read. Yours truly, Meaghan Diogo
Date published: 2005-06-27
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...an action packed conclusion! I personally think that A Series of Unfortunate Events is brilliant, along with the newest edition to the series, The Slippery Slope. It took me less than a day to read because I was completly hooked till the end. For those of you who haven't read any of these books, it's about three children who lost their parents to a fire and start off by living with their realitive Count Olaf. Though they don't know that he is a kniving wolf (not literally) who will do pretty much anything to get the Baudelaire fortune (a huge amount of money left from their parents). I reccomend reading the Slippery Slope because it's an amazing book with an action-packed conclusion!
Date published: 2005-06-27
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...reccomend it to all... Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events follows the misfortunes of the 3 Baudelaire children - Violet, Klaus and Sunny. Each of these children has a special talent. Violet, the eldest is a master at inventing, Klaus is extremely well read, and Sunny, who is still a baby, has 4 exceptionally large teeth. These talents have saved the Baudelaires more than once. Their adventure begins in the first book, ˜The Bad Beginning, when they learn about the terrible fire that destroyed their home, and killed their parents. Since then, they have been through many guardians, all along followed by the evil Count Olaf, who wants the enormous fortune their parents left behind. At the beginning of the 10th book, ˜The Slippery Slope , Sunny is in the clutches of Count Olaf, while her elder siblings hurtle toward their deaths. At the last possible moment, Violet uses her inventing skills to invent a brake and save both their lives. Then they're off to climb the Mortaim Mountains to save their sister's life and discover the secrets of V.F.D. In the meantime, Sunny is with Count Olaf and his troupe, who are forcing them to do silly things that a baby couldn't possibly be expected to do, such as putting up tents and making food for the troupe to eat. While Sunny was slaving away for Count Olaf, her siblings were climbing the mountain to find her. On their way up they found a cave they could use as shelter, only to find it occupied by the Snow Scouts. Fortunately, they were accomodating, so the Baudelaires stayed in the cave. After they fell asleep, the Baudelaires were woken up by one of the snow scouts. He led the Baudelaires throught the Vertical Flame Diverter, which was a chimney from the cave they were in and a secret passageway to the V.F.D. headquarters. When they reached the top of the Vertical Flame Diverter there was a door, which, accordind the snow scout, was called the Vernacularly Fastened Door. Combining Violet's inventing skills with the information Klaus knew from books and what the snow scout knew about V.F.D., they were able to unlock the door. Their excitement soon vanished, as what they saw was anything but exciting. What they saw was simply that they were too late. The headquarters were already gone. It had been burned down. The Baudelaires then got an incredible shock. The snow scout told them his name. He was none other than Quigley Quagmire, the triplet of Duncan and Isadora, the Buadelaires friends.' They had thought he was dead. He told them how he escaped the fire that destroyed his home, only puzzling the Baudelaires further. Violet knew Sunny was at the summit with count Olaf and had to save her. since the waterfall was frozen over, Violet knew she could climb it. She made an invention, and climbed up to rescue her sister. When she got there, Sunny informed her that Count Olaf had the Snicket file. Then, using their special skills the siblings managee to escape Count Olaf's cluthches, although it doesn't end happy. At the end of this book, the sibling are being swept down the Stricken Stream, separated from Quigley. I enjoyed this book very much, and reccomend it to all. i think Lemony Snicket is a superb writer, and hope he will continue to write when he is finished with the series. If you would like to find out what happens next, be sure to read the next book when it comes out this fall, called the Grim Grotto. And dont forget to see the first movie, in theatres this December.
Date published: 2005-06-27
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Slippery Slope~one star My first thought of this book appeared to be the following, ˜RECYCLE IT! I can truly say I did no enjoy this book. I found the author constantly droning on about frivolous things and, in my personal opinion; I struggled to grasp the characteristics of the characters. Also, I found the mysterious V.F.D peculiar. Why would they invest themselves into a program in which they did not know the name of? Sunny, was the youngest Adelaide out of her siblings, Claire and Klaus. She unfortunately, was captured by pompous villains, who enslaved her at the top of the mountain to clean and cook. She, of course was NOT happy about the turn of events. Even though she was a baby, her vocabulary in her mind was unbelievable. I thought that it was unnecessary to write in that way. It would have been more believable if she used incorrect sentence structure like this: ˜ hi-o! Sunny have plan! instead of quote: ˜Aubergine, Sunny replied, which meant I've concocted a plan involving this eggplant, and it doesn't matter if I tell you about it because you would never understand I found this un-convincing. But still, this book ended as satisfying as always. Good overcomes evil. Though I have never read any ˜Series of Unfortunate Events novels, after reading this book, I don't think I will. Recycle it! Maybe my friend will love it.
Date published: 2005-06-27
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...this one tops the cake... I loved this book! I've read the whole series and this one tops the cake. I was waiting for ages for this book to come out, when it did I bought it and finished it in one day. I just could not stop myself! Lemony Snicket has out done himself, I mean it. Between Verbal Fridge Dialogue, meeting up with Quigley Quagmire and Count Olaf up to his old tricks, -not to mention finally finding the V.F.D. headquarters- this book is a force to be reckoned with! My favorite character is Klaus because he's a lot like me. He never gets bored of reading or learning new things. He's quick on his feet and hardly trips up. He even has glasses like me, too. I love how this book and this series lets you figure out things too. I've had hours of brain work because I couldn't help thinking who was behind the mask or who was it that burned down the headquarters. This book is not just a normal story about kids running away from an evil villian only to meet up with him later. This book is more, it has loads of action, emotion and it was very interesting I thought when the two white faced woman left the troop. This book is just to great! I can't point out one bad thing about it. It has action, it's full of suspense and it makes you think. My friends agree with me too. At the back of every book is a small letter or clue that hints about the next book. I may say that the endings are sometimes a bit sloppy, but that's it. I would rate this book ***** (five stars), and give it eight A+'s.
Date published: 2005-06-27
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...definitely worth a read... Lemony Snicket begins his book by referring to the poem The Road Less Traveled , and indeed, his book is about some orphans who take the road traveled the least. I don't think many people go on vacation to roll backwards down a mountain in a caravan, crawl through hidden passage ways with complete strangers, climb up frozen waterfalls with nothing but some forks and a chandelier, and finally end up being swept down a river on a wooden toboggan, especially not a family of three orphans. Along with that the youngest in the family, 3-year-old Sunny, finds herself slaves to villains who make her do all the cooking and cleaning in the camp. That's not all, the elder two orphans end up finding their friends' long lost triplet who was thought to have perished in a fire that destroyed his house sometime earlier. This book is a comical (because it is so melancholy) mystery full of outrageous similes, metaphors and thousands of V.F.D. phrases (ex: Volunteer Feline Detectives , Verdant Flammable Devices , Vernacular Fastened Door , ect). All in all, I enjoyed reading this book (other than the fact that Lemony repeats the same phrase 5 times in chapter 6 and the constant repetition of the Snow Scouts Alphabet pledge) and would recommend it to people who love mysteries that never end and reading about lots of bad things that happen to other people, or just like to laugh. If I were given a scorecard on which to rate this book out of ten (ten being the fantastic and 1 being horrible) I would most definitely give this book a seven or eight. If you ask me to tell you the truth, I would say that Lemony Snicket's The Slippery Slope is definitely worth a read.
Date published: 2005-06-27
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...exciting... I read the whole series twice and all the books were more exciting every time I read them.The most exciting one though was definitely the slippery slope.I disliked the parts where Lemony Snicket iterrupted the story with fake tales.
Date published: 2005-06-27
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ... very well written... The Slippery Slope was a good book. It's exciting and very interesting, but I didn't like how Lemony Snicket went on and on about here this means that etc. The series is different from other mystery books and it is very well written. The characters are interesting, but why couldn't he end the series in this book? I think he has already written too many books in this series. Also, the Baudelaire children have more mysteries to solve by the end of this book than they started out with in the first book. I would rate it 4 out of 5.
Date published: 2005-06-27
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Only the end can tell... During the tenth book in the Series of Unfortunate Events by Lemony Snicket, The Slippery Slope the Baudelaire orphans, Violet, Klaus and Sunny cross paths with a swarm of snow gnats who are known to be ill-tempered and find joy in stinging anything that is unfortunate enough to be in their way, snow scouts who are ˜xylophone instead of ˜xenial and of course Count Olaf and his evil troupe. Now it is up to Violet, Klaus and someone who supposedly burned in a fire to save Sunny who was kidnapped and is now being held captive and forced to cook wonderful meals from frozen food and sleep in cookware. Will the Baudelaires be able to ride the weariest river that winds somewhere safe to sea? Or will Count Olaf and his troupe finally get their greedy hands on the Baudelaire fortune? Only the end can tell.
Date published: 2005-06-27
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...give it 5 stars... This book like many of Lemony Snickets has many mysteries to be solved. It has all kinds of twits to keep you interested and wanting to know more. It has of course a slippery slope, an evil plot, a person thought dead, three unfortunate siblings, and last but defiantly least horrible villains. Young Sunny must show courage, Violet must be inventive, and Klaus must use everything he knows. They must with the help of a new friend rescue Sunny and leave with their lives. I think this book is one of my favourites of the series. The only thing I did not like about this book is that Olaf once again goes free and causes the Bauelaire children grief. And even though I've tried I can't give it another ending that would not take away from this book. Though I like all the siblings I think the one I can relate to most of all is Klaus. For most girls it would be Violet but because Klaus like me loves to read I like him best. He makes me think that maybe one day I could learn as much as him. This book I think would appeal to those who have hope. Yes hope, hope that one day the Baudelaire siblings will be free with a caring guardian and that Olaf will get what's coming to him. Also for those who like to laugh, it may seem strange to recommend a series of unfortunate events to those who like humour but its not. Lemony Snicket (I think) to lighten the mood adds humour now and again, which is just another reason these books appeal to me. Thus I can say with complete confidents that this is one of the best books I've read and is recommended for everybody that likes anything. For the slippery slope has everything and I myself give it 5 stars. So with all due respect, Meagan Caicedo
Date published: 2005-06-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...the ideas were original... I think A Series of Unfortunate Events the Slippery Slope by Lemony Snicket is a very interesting book. It has an exciting plot a great beginning, and a suspenseful ending. I have read many of the books in this series and this one is by far the best. I like the unexpected things that happen in the story very much like the appearance of Quigley Quagmire. The book was a little bit to easy to predict like most other books in this series. I thought the book was very creative and all the ideas were original. This book kept me wanting to read the story at every possible moment. It was quite hard to put the book down, although I have had harder books to put down. I thought that the book was good although Lemony Snicket should cut down on the explanations. If I could have changed the ending I would have not explained the whole quatrain I would have let the readers try to figure out what it means because it was pretty obvious what the meaning of the poem is. I think the story line of this book is excellent. At parts I could relate to different characters, like when Sunny was on top of the hill by herself because I have felt very lonely before. I could also relate to how Klaus and Violet felt when Carmelita Spats was making fun of them. This book would appeal to children from 8-15 or anyone who likes suspense. This book is an adventure book. If I had to change anything I would cut down on the explanations because most of the words that are explained are pretty basic. This book doesn't remind me of any other book but it does remind me of a line out of a song, the line is its over before it has begun it reminds me of that because everything they have gets taken away. They also lose there guardians rather quickly too. Overall I think The Slippery Slope by Lemony Snicket is a pretty good book.
Date published: 2005-06-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...one imaginative adventure after another... ˜The Slippery Slope is Lemony Snicket's tenth book in ˜A Series of Unfortunate Events . In my opinion, it is worth a perfect ten out of ten. I give this novel such a rating for its humour, adventure, and Snicket's ability to capture your feelings when he's talking about how much misery the children have been through. ˜The Slippery Slope is about three orphans framed for murder by the malicious Count Olaf. The two eldest, Violet and Klaus, are stuck at the bottom of an icy cold mountain, while their baby sister, Sunny, is at the top, a slave within the Count's clutches. While venturing to the top, the eldest are seeking a secret organization headquarters, to see if one of their parents may possibly be alive. This marvelous novel is funny, adventurous, mysterious, and it makes you really feel what the children are going through. Snicket adds humour to his novels, which creates an equal balance of misery and nonsense. One funny example is: Anyone who wanted to use it (a device that acts as a lock) had to correctly answer a series of questions concerning the force of gravity, the habitats of carnivorous beasts, and the central themes of Russian novels. Throughout the entire series, Snicket comes up with one imaginative adventure after another. From mountain climbing to a herd of snow gnats to using food for deciphering a code, the children go through handfuls of adventures. There are many mysteries in this novel, but one of the main mysteries is whether or not the children will find their parents. Snicket is an expert at translating the childrens' feelings so that we feel them, too. In one chapter, Violet is sitting with a friend and they start to talk about how wonderful their parents were. Their sadness seeps into you like water into a sponge. Lemony Snicket's writing style is incredibly unique. He speaks directly to the reader, and puts a certain amount of nonsense into his novels, but not enough to snatch your worry for the orphans away. He does a marvelous job of creating a bond between you and the children. He also gives hilarious comparisons when explaining how things work. One funny comparison given to explain a caravan slowing down in muck was a person running through lasagna . I would recommend this novel to everybody over the age of eight. Readers who enjoyed Harry Potter or the Eddie Dickens trilogy will lap up any of the novels in ˜The Series of Unfortunate Events . Snicket is like an artist painting with words, mixing up all the techniques an artist could use. Instead of a palette and paintbrush, his tools are pencils, papers, and a magnificent imagination.
Date published: 2005-06-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from The S In this book Violet, Klaus, and Sunny are faced with escaping their uncle. Count Olaf (their uncle) is trying to catch his nieces and nephew to inharit their fortune. Of course the three children have a misfortune and Sunny (baby of family) gets taken away by their mean , nasty , uncle. Sunny is hung in a cage over a waterfall and if Violet and Klaus don't hand over one of them their uncle will drop Sunny!!!!
Date published: 2005-06-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...one of a kind... The Slippery Slope is the tenth tale of the Baudelaires and the unfortunate events that take place in their life. In this episode Sunny has just been kidnapped by their enemy Count Olaf. While on their way to rescue her they meet up with Quigley the supposedly dead Quagmire triplet. He helps them discover some of the secrets about the VFD at the ruins of the VFD headquarters, including the Verbal Fridge Dialogue. While Sunny was forced to cook for Olaf, Esme, the man with a beard but no hair, the woman with hair but no beard, and Olaf's crew, she eavesdrops and finds the last safe place; Hotel Denouement. Violet, Klaus and Quigley climb the slippery slope of the Mortmain Mountain and tell Olaf that they know where the sugar bowl is so they should give Sunny back. They are interrupted by the snow scouts whom he captures and forces to join his crew. The Baudelaires and Quigley slide down the slope on a toboggan. The ice breaks and Quigley is separated by the rushing water of the waterfall and the Baudelaire's tenth story ends with them sitting in a floating sled down one of the sources of the Stricken Stream. I really liked this book and how this time it was completely different. I thought Lemony Snicket would run out of people to take care of the Baudelaires, and the series would end unfinished! I'm so glad that didn't happen. I also liked how they found Quigley even though it was by chance. That was probably the best thing that had happened to them since the series started. I loved how there were added mysteries to the whole scene with the VFD Headquarters. I love to write, but can't think of any way to end the book better. The ending leaves no clues about the next book which makes you want to read it. This was the first Series of Unfortunate Events book where I had an emotion after reading it. I felt so bad for the Baudelaires and the Quagmires. This one really made me think at the end and wonder what would happen or if they would ever find their parents and solve all the mysteries. Anyone that doesn't like happily ever after books would like this book and the whole series. Also anyone that likes adventure or mystery would love this book. I honestly HATE mystery but this seems more, to me, like an adventure story. If I could change one thing about this book it would be that they would have found more out about the Verbal Fridge Dialogue. It was almost a little overwhelming to think of all the new mysteries they would have to solve but that's probably how the Baudelaires would have felt too. I honestly couldn't think of any other show or book or movie or anything that could relate to this book. It was one of a kind. The book was great and I think everyone should read it!
Date published: 2005-06-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...extremely well written... This book is about 3 kids (the Baudelaires) there names are Violet (14) Klaus (13) and Sunny (to young to talk) who are brothers and sisters. Do to there recent series of unfortunate events they have been through many guardians and are now on the run from the police and the evil Count Olaf. This time they move up the mountain in hope to find V.F.D headquarters but with there unfortunate events history, it is not a surprise that they end up facing a new fork in the road or shall I say fork in the mountain. Count Olaf takes there little sister; sunny, in hope of stealing the Baudelaire fortune. But with Klaus' great researching skills and Violets amazing inventing ability the 2 siblings narrowly avoid life threatening trouble, and start on a new adventure back up the mountain to rescue there baby sister and to find a survivor from the horrible fire that changed there life forever. On there way up to the top they meet a flock of snow nats and the Snow Scouts. The 2 Baudelaire Siblings become part of the group of Snow Scouts and meet someone they thought was dead, They met the third Quagmire (whose name is Quigley) triplet who helps them find V.F.D. headquarters but the headquarters had unfortunately been burned down, and he helps the 2 siblings rescue there sister but then Quigley gets taken by the waters of the mountain and floats away from the reunited Baudelaire siblings. I really enjoyed reading this book. I thought it was extremely well written. When I read it, it seemed like I was in the book. I always like it when Violet invents stuff. That is my favourite part in all the books. I don't really like in the book though how Lemony Snicket tells so many stories I get very tired of them o few is Okay but that many is tiring. I think this book will appeal to anyone with a sense of adventure and someone who likes feeling like they are in the book. This book is also a bit of a mystery so anyone who likes mysteries. If I could change anything in the book it would be the end how Olaf got Carmelita Spat. I would change this part because I find it not very possible that she could be in the mountains the same time as the Baudelaires. Anything is possible, so I don't think I would change it but I thought that was a little odd. Other then the ending and the long stories I really enjoyed reading this book.
Date published: 2005-06-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...an exciting adventure... The Slippery Slope was an exciting adventure. I felt as if I was one of the charaters all the way through. I couldn't wait to see what happened at the end, but as usual in Lemony Snicket's books, you're left in suspense until the next book comes out. I've read all of the Series of Unfortunate Events books, but this was the best by far! I can't wait to continue the unfortunate adventures of Violet, Sunny and Klaus.
Date published: 2005-06-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from I liked every single thing about it. The Slippery Slope is a book that would appeal to anybody who likes to laugh when they read. It's about two orphans ( Violet and Klaus ) who were separated from their baby sister(Sunny Baudelaire) and attempt to climb a mountain, with a strange boy, looking for her. Sunny works for Count Olaf by cooking, cleaning and things like that. I liked how the author puts definitions and examples in the book and makes it so miserable that it is funny, as Esme Squalor would say, It's so out it's in! I liked every single thing about it. If I could change one thing it would be that Count Olaf threw the eggplant off the cliff but slipped so that the eggplant goes all over the woman with hair but no beard and the man with a beard but no hair. It would be cool to read about their reaction. When I read it I felt like I do when I read any book in A Series of Unfortunate Events , like I am in the book watching what the Baudelaires are doing, I'm there as they do everything and I can't put the book down. All in all it is one of the best books ever. The End
Date published: 2005-06-23
Rated 3 out of 5 by from The Slippery Slope it was okay
Date published: 2005-06-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...I like his style... Lemony Snicket was always one of my preferred authors, and this is the best book yet in his series! The reason why he is one of my favourites is because I like his style. Plus, you'll always learn a new word or two because of the way he writes. For instance, in The Miserable Mill, you learn that inordinate can mean irregular, immoderate, disordly or costly. In The Slippery Slope, the Baudelaire orphans are on another exciting adventure. After escaping a close death, Klaus and Violet join a group of campers called the Snow Scouts, where they find a survivor from a terrible fire from a long time ago. Using his help, they travel up the Mortmain Mountains in a search for a headquarters of the VFD in the Valley of Four Drafts and their kidnapped sister, Sunny. The Baudelaires discover many secrets of the VFD, and in the end they find out where the last safe headquarters of the VFD is. Now the Baudelaires have to get there before Count Olaf and his accomplices do, in order to save the VFD. I liked this book because it was full of mystery, clues and riddles that you can't seem to figure out until the end of the book. I think a good writer is a person that can hold a person's attention until the very end. A great writer can make a person stop breathing because of the suspense and still keep the person wondering long after they finish the book. That's what The Slippery Slope was like to me, and that's why I loved it so much. I think this book is perfect for just about anybody. It doesn't matter if you like mystery books, fantasy books or non-fiction books ”Lemony Snicket has this amazing ability to squish all of those elements into one book. Now that, you have to admit, is cool. If I could change some things about the book, is how poor Sunny had to sleep in a casserole dish and also the part where Count Olaf tells Sunny to clean out the car by blowing as hard as she could. First of all, nobody should sleep in a casserole dish, not even a baby, especially not a young girl who isn't a baby anymore. Second point, blowing potato chip crumbs out of the car is an impossible task! I can't believe Count Olaf is this mean to a baby! Correction, toddler. This book always (for some strange reason) reminds me of hot chocolate. I have no idea how that happens! I just sit down and read this book, and all of a sudden I have this craving for hot chocolate! I guess it's because of the frosty atmosphere of the plot. Anyways, the Slippery Slope is a have-to-read book! It's so full of suspense and mystery that it will prevent you from putting it down! I can't wait until the next book comes out!
Date published: 2005-06-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from The Slippery Slope They are in some kind of car and it won't stop moving.They try to find things inside the drawer and found really sticky things. They put it on the tires and it stopped before they fell off a cliff and got out. Sunny, Violet, and Klaus are walking in an cold ice place they only have a sweater and a coat. they had to share them suddenly bees and it started to sting them.
Date published: 2005-06-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...an odd but good author... In this book, Sunny Baudelaire is Count Olaf's prisoner trying to escape while Violet and Klaus Baudelaire stop a speeding caravan from falling down a cliff while they were in it, meet a survivor from a huge fire, figure out clues from the remaints of the V.F.D. headquarters, and climb down a frozen waterfall. Lemony Snicket may be an odd but good author. This book is amazing!
Date published: 2005-06-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...chilling tale... Lemony Snickets A Series of Unfortunate Events The Slippery Slope is an exciting story filled with adventure, mystery and good humor. Before the chilling tale of the Slippery Slope three unfortunate Baudelaire children named Violet, Klaus and Sunny who after losing their parents in a terrible fire have been trying to escape from a terrible man named Count Olaf, who will do anything to get the enormous fortune the Baudelaires parents left behind. After figureing out Count Olaf was part of an organization called V.F.D the children go on an endless journey escaping Count Olaf and his gang, while finding clues to the secrets of V.F.D along the way. Now the Baudelaires are on an adventure up, and down the Mortmain Mountains where they figure out they are not the only ones travelling the mountains. They discover more clues to the secret of V.F.D while meeting a few new and old 'friends' along the way. I loved this book. It is a very thrilling and hilarious tale of suspense, mystery, adventure and humor. I also loved the other Series of Unfortunate Events books. Lemony Snicket is an amazing writer with lots of talent. The book had many good plots to keep the reader wanting to read more and more. The book had a very exciting ending which makes you want to read the next one so badly. I would not have the book any other way. The charecters in the book all had a very distinctive personality. Like Violet and inventing, Klaus and his reading abilities and Sunny with her teeth. This book is for people who enjoy, mystery and adventure, suspense, excitment and humor. So go ahead and give the book a try!
Date published: 2005-06-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...an excellent read... Lemony Snicket..... even the name sounds interesting! He always tries to discourage you from reading his books, but in doing so, he tempts you even more. His, 'A Series of Unfortunate Events' is about the 3 Bauldelaire Orphans, Violet, Klaus, and Sunny, and their search for a home with kind, loving parents, and a hiding place from Count Olaf (he want's their fortune!). In 'The Slippery Slope', we follow Violet and Klaus Bauldelaire in their search for Sunny, who was taken by Count Olaf in the last book. I would tell you more, but then I would spoil the whole book for you! And don't forget the rest of the series too, including Lemony's Unauthoized Biography! This book is an excellent read, and a recomend it for all who have trouble with words (he explains them), who love to read, who like mysteries, who like suspense, and, well, pretty much everybody would like this book! I suggest you read it A.S.A.P..
Date published: 2005-06-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...an out-of-the-ordinary must read... If you read a regular book, you will notice that there is a problem. In the end the problem is resolved. Well, The Slippery Slope does the exact opposite. Instead of urging you to read on, the back of the book has a warning, telling you to drop the book and run FAR away. Like other novels, there is a problem. Instead of the problem being solved, it gets more and more complex as the plot thickens. Towards the end, the problem is impossibly complicated, and ends up in a disaster. This book is an out-of-the-ordinary must read. Although, I would suggest reading the other books in the series first, this book is garunteed to have you on the edge of your seat. *** NEWS FLASH *** On September 31st 2004, the sequel to The Slippery Slope; The Grim Grotto miserably sneaks into a bookstore near you. Read it if you dare...
Date published: 2005-06-23
Rated 3 out of 5 by from ...better as a TV show... It was pretty interesting but to skary I think it would be better as a TV show. Hey if you like skary books it is a must read. I hate that all that bad stuff happens to the orfens I espeshely hate Cout Olof. My advice to the auther mak something good happen( like making Count Olof die in the next book) or start a new seris .
Date published: 2005-06-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...laugh-out-loud story... This story is a unique and excellent sequel to the other 9 books in The Series of Unfortunate Events. It is both interesting, and retaining of the wittiness of its predecessors. Despite the author's warnings, it is definitely worth reading. Though the Baudelaires' story may not be the average happy book, it definitely kept my attention, and would likely do so for any other kid between the ages of 10 and 15. In this thrilling, somewhat depressing, but also laugh-out-loud story, there seems to be some hope for the Baudelaire Orphans, even though Sunny, the youngest, is found in the clutches of the evil Count Olaf, and made to be a servant. Klaus and Violet run into an odd group of scouts, an old acquaintance from the 5th book, a boy who they believed to be dead, and more! They finally find the VFD headquarters, only to have their hopes shattered after seeing all that remains. Violet continues to help with her inventions, Klaus with his new words, and they all discover that Sunny isn't a baby anymore, but a young girl. Though that's not all, this story, as well as its sequels, follows a distinct pattern of tragedy, sadness, and as the title suggests ”unfortunate events” even though somehow it does not drag you down into its deepest despair. Lemony Snicket has a way of writing that tops the charts for pretty much everything! Though he does tend to have run on sentences, he convinces you that he's dedicated his life to researching the Baudelaires' case. I find it rather funny how he tries to convince you not to read his books, and even hid a letter to his sister in this one because he was sure that no one would be reading it. Unfortunately, that makes me want to read it even more, and it probably will do the same for you. He uses interesting comparisons like Sunny's situation to Cinderella's, and often includes long lists of stuff sometimes repeated once, twice, or even three times for clearness and humor! He seems to make situations sound worse then they are, while actually making the book more interesting. I find that now I feel like I know Lemony, even though I know that he's really a fictional character. I really like that. In addition, I believe that Lemony Snicket has this book and the others planned out and perfect it just wouldn't be the same, or as good with a different ending or something changed. With this kind of book, you just don't think of what could have happened, you think of what will happen. Most books have a specific genre, but this one seems to fit a lot, not just one. It has some mystery, some fiction, some fantasy, some suspense, and maybe even a bit of horror. No matter what's your favourite, I think that you will enjoy reading this book. I sure did. Enjoy!
Date published: 2005-06-23
Rated 3 out of 5 by from love all of the Series... The slippery slope is the 10th book in the Lemony Snicket series called A Series of Unfortunate Events . These books tell the story of three orphaned children, Violet, Klaus, and Sunny Baudelaire. The children are the heirs of a large fortune. In each book, a wicked man called Count Olaf threatens the children's lives. Count Olaf wants to kill the children to get their money. So far, he has never succeeded though he always comes close. This story is no exception. The story begins with Sunny being driven toward headquarters in the Mortmain Mountains. The driver of the car is none other than Count Olaf, along with his girlfriend Esme Squalor, and other business associates of the Count. In the meantime, the older Baudelaire children are plummeting down the mountainside in an out of control caravan. Violet, a very intelligent girl, devises a way to escape death and the two older children begin the task of trying to rescue Sunny from the clutches of Count Olaf. Time and again throughout the book, Violet and Klaus find themselves in peril but, in the end, they defeat Count Olaf yet again and rescue their little sister, Sunny. I love all of the Series of Unfortunate Events books. Lemony Snicket is an excellent writer. When you start one of his books, you don't want to put it down until it is done. His writing is very comical. For example, in the beginning of the book he is describing what the book is like and he says I can no more suggest the reading of this woeful book than I can recommend wandering around the woods by yourself, because like the road less traveled, this book is likely to make you feel lonely, miserable, and in need of help. I would highly recommend reading this book. If you like funny stories with lots of mystery and adventure, this is the book for you. If you are going on a car trip, the Lemony Snicket books are also available as book tapes and listening to them is a great way to pass the time. Happy Reading!
Date published: 2005-06-22
Rated 3 out of 5 by from love all of the Series... The slippery slope is the 10th book in the Lemony Snicket series called A Series of Unfortunate Events . These books tell the story of three orphaned children, Violet, Klaus, and Sunny Baudelaire. The children are the heirs of a large fortune. In each book, a wicked man called Count Olaf threatens the children's lives. Count Olaf wants to kill the children to get their money. So far, he has never succeeded though he always comes close. This story is no exception. The story begins with Sunny being driven toward headquarters in the Mortmain Mountains. The driver of the car is none other than Count Olaf, along with his girlfriend Esme Squalor, and other business associates of the Count. In the meantime, the older Baudelaire children are plummeting down the mountainside in an out of control caravan. Violet, a very intelligent girl, devises a way to escape death and the two older children begin the task of trying to rescue Sunny from the clutches of Count Olaf. Time and again throughout the book, Violet and Klaus find themselves in peril but, in the end, they defeat Count Olaf yet again and rescue their little sister, Sunny. I love all of the Series of Unfortunate Events books. Lemony Snicket is an excellent writer. When you start one of his books, you don't want to put it down until it is done. His writing is very comical. For example, in the beginning of the book he is describing what the book is like and he says I can no more suggest the reading of this woeful book than I can recommend wandering around the woods by yourself, because like the road less traveled, this book is likely to make you feel lonely, miserable, and in need of help. I would highly recommend reading this book. If you like funny stories with lots of mystery and adventure, this is the book for you. If you are going on a car trip, the Lemony Snicket books are also available as book tapes and listening to them is a great way to pass the time. Happy Reading!
Date published: 2005-06-22
Rated 5 out of 5 by from AWESOME This book was the best out of The Series of Unfortunate Events . Lemony Snicket really did it this time! He rules!! He has such a great imagination! Its so hard to explain how AWSOME this book was! It rocked!
Date published: 2005-06-22
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...laughter, mystery, and suspense... This book is about three children named Violet, Sunny, and Klaus. The are steadily trying to escape from there greedy, cruel, Uncle (Count Olaf) and his crew. The reason for this is because the Baulderlaires have a large fortune that was gave to them from their parents who unfortunetely die or vanish in the first book. It is the tenth book in a series of thirteen. It is full of laughter, mystery, and suspense. Every time they think they lose Count Olaf he catches up with them. Also in each book the children have a new gaurdian and start new lives. I would like to go on and explain every detail but there is a 500 word max. I enjoy the books and enjoy Lemony Snicket's writing. I encourage everyone to read and hope to hear from you soon!! Thank you
Date published: 2005-06-22
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...exciting and suspenseful... The concept of three unfortunate siblings and their struggle to overcome the devious plans of Count Olaf and his crew is written wonderfully. I loved when the book got really exciting and suspenseful the author Lemony Snicket would change the subject to keep readers reading further on. This novel is a must read for boys and girls from the ages of 9 to 14. You will not put this book down until the very end.
Date published: 2005-06-22
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Lemony Snicket is brilliant! Violet and Klaus Baudelaire are journeying through ice, snow and snow gnats to get to the top of a mountain in order to rescue their sister, Sunny, who was stolen by Count Olaf, who has his stone cold heart set on their family fortune. While Klaus and Violet find a burnt down headquarters, an unlikely survivor from a fire and a clue of where they need to go next, Sunny is stuck doing all the dirty chores of Olaf and his troupe. In the end, the siblings escape, not knowing they're on their way to safety and Olaf is nearby. I love this book! Lemony Snicket is brilliant! The part in the plot I liked the best was when Quigley showed up when he was presumed dead, and the clues in the refrigerator about where to go if something happened to the headquarters. It's all so unique. The only thing I disliked about the plot was that the only part where there was romance, was cut out by the author. I'd change that, and it wouldn't really affect the plot it there was. It may make the story more interesting to some. Another ending that would be good is if they escape down the stream, then realize that Olaf captured Klaus while he was fleeing. That would be a good ending, but it may not fit in with what the author will do with the rest of the series. I can relate easily to Klaus and Violet. I love to read like Klaus. I will read almost any material and know a lot because of it. I can relate to Violet because I love to invent things: from recipes to games to gadgets to make like easier. This book would appeal to ages eight and up. They would find it interesting, but may find it challenging to read to themselves. To read to oneself, ages eleven and up would be suffice. There are a few laughs in this book, and it's great to escape into for a while. It would appeal to people who like the genre of mystery and adventure. Mystery because all their questions lead to answers and all the answers lead to more questions. Adventure because Klaus and Violet journey to find their sister. Not many things in this book made me think of many books, movies or shows. This plot is so unique. The Thief Lord is similar because both are about orphaned children who live with other relatives. They lead miserable lives. The Baudelaires are adopted by a town and are framed for murder. They must live in the outside world and escape being caught by Olaf and the police. In The Thief Lord, Prosper and Bo run away from their aunt and uncle to live in the city of Venice, on their own. They constantly try to escape getting caught and going home. It is also like Harry Potter because Harry lives with his relatives and is always trying to get out of trouble.
Date published: 2005-06-22
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...so hard to put down... Here it is, Snicket fans: the longest book yet in the Series of Unfortunate Events. As followers of the series know, each book begins with the Baudelaire orphans, Violet, Klaus, and of course the youngest sibling, Sunny, heading to the residence of their next guardian. At the start of the series, the three children learned their house had been destroyed by fire and their parents killed in the inferno. The kids are shipped from one guardian to another, while desperately trying to avoid the clutches of the evil Count Olaf, who is bent on kidnapping them and stealing their deceased parents' fortune. The Slippery Slope begins differently than the other books because the children are not on their way to live with a new caregiver, but are trapped in a trailer that is careening down an icy mountain road with no way to slow down. At the end of the ninth book, entitled The Carnivorous Carnival, Count Olaf kidnapped Sunny. Now, Violet and Klaus have to try and rescue her, while at the same time seeking the headquarters of V.F.D., a secret organization their parents were supposedly members of. On their way up the Mortmain Mountains, the Baudelaires meet someone they thought was dead, but it isn't who they expect. The Slippery Slope has more mystery and suspense than the other books; it is these attributes that make the book so hard to put down. Littered with very dark, yet sometimes hilarious bits of humor, The Slippery Slope is a delicious read. Lemony Snicket has a very distinct and original style of writing that cannot be fairly compared with any other children's literature. Each book in the series has thirteen chapters, and Snicket says there will be thirteen books in the series. He defines words that may be unfamiliar to readers and uses extremely clever analogies that caused me to laugh out loud in many cases. Also, Sunny's dialogue, formerly just baby talk that only her siblings could comprehend, has evolved into real words like Eureka and Lox . Nevertheless, the inanely stupid Olaf still can't understand a word she is saying. I would not recommend the Series of Unfortunate Events to people who only enjoy books with happy endings; there is not a single title in the series that has that characteristic... yet. I can only hope the final tome will have an ending that could be considered cheerful. Additionally, I would not recommend reading The Slippery Slope before the rest of the series; the book refers to those preceding it numerous times, and may confuse readers when the characters start to discuss events that occurred in the second and third books. However, the entire series is brilliantly written and I would heartily recommend the books to almost anybody between the ages of ten and fourteen who enjoys a good mystery and black humor.
Date published: 2005-06-22
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...breathtaking action... Lemony Snicket puts on display his wonderful writing once again in the Baudelaires' tenth adventure, The Slippery Slope. The three siblings find themselves in a very difficult situation. They have many questions unanswered, and they want all the facts. Solving mysteries, and finding clues are of course priorities in this book, and that's what makes it so exciting. If you love adventures then you will definitely like this novel. Along with experiencing the breathtaking action of the book, you also get to learn many useful life lessons, which I think everyone should know.
Date published: 2005-06-22
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...a good book... The two eldest Baudelaire siblings, Klaus and Violet, are continuing their search for their beloved baby sister Sunny. Climbing up a huge and cold mountain, they are struggling through the snowy and harsh conditions of the great slope. Soon Klaus and Violet will find some nasty surprises for them when they get to the top. Meanwhile Sunny is cooking cold meals for Count Olaf and his troupe. Count Olaf had been the Baudelaires' first guardian and was always determined to get his filthy hands on the Baudelaire fourtune. Will the Baudelaire siblings ever outwit Count Olaf? Will they ever be reunited? Meeting strange people, discovering mysterious things and facing dangerous beings the Baudelaires might not survive in this unfortunate and dangerous world of disasters. I think this was a good book. The storyline was creative, and the author used lots of description and a creative use of words. The book, in my opinion, would appeal most to those who love adventure and mystery. One thing I would like to say is that the story, as the author said, is very unpleasent. It seems to drag on a lot too, and there are too many books in the series. One thing I would change about this book is to make it, well, a bit more pleasent and make the series a bit shorter. I would give this book an 8.510.
Date published: 2005-06-22
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...never cease to amaze... Lemony Snicket does it again with his crude sense of humour, his wild imagination (maybe not...), and with a bit of help from the Baudelaire orphans. Again on a search for the true meaning of V.F.D, AND the orphans find themselves in a situation worse than before. Sunny is now at the mercy of Count Olaf who, in turn, wants the large fortune the Baudelaire's parents left behind. This chapter in Sunny, Klaus, and Violet's story is the best of them so far in my book. Although this book could have used a bit more Lemony Snicket humour, his storylines never cease to amaze. With all the twists, turns, and hidden messages in this book, it's sure to provide a great read to anyone. Although, if you're found of happy endings, and hate depressing storylines this book may not be for you. But as the Director of the Series of Unfortunate Events put it, Don't Say I Didn't Warn You.
Date published: 2005-06-22
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...an exciting story... I loved this book! I read 4 other books by Lemony Snicket and I loved them all. I read this book in 2 days I really was into it. I reccommend it to anybody that wants to read an exciting story that makes you want to read the next book. It was very gripping.
Date published: 2005-06-22
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...made me a little sad... The Series of Unfortunate Events is one of the best books I've ever read. This book is about the bardileres and the evil Count Olaf. In this book of the series the bardileres are traveling up a mouton looking for their parents, but it ends up that they are looking for their sister and their parent. They also find a mysteries someone. On the cover illustration it would have been better if the mouton was bigger. The characters that I'm most like would be Klaus and Violet because I like to read and invent. In one of the books I think they should have a happy ending. This book made me a little sad. I recommend this book to people who like a never ending mystery.
Date published: 2005-06-22
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...very good... It was a very good book......Limony Sniket is a very good author. I have read almost all of his books.
Date published: 2005-06-22
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...enjoyed the feel... In the beginning, the book seemed to have continued from the last book. The two eldest Baudelaire orphans were together while Sunny was with Count Olaf. As Sunny stayed with Count Olaf, he made her do all the chores such as doing the dishes, cooking, cleaning, etc. The two eldest Baudlaires were finding a way to save and find Sunny. Aside from that, their journey turned into an adventure filled with mysteries and connections. Then, the two eldest found Quigley, where they found even more clues to their questions. But some of the information Quigley gave led to more questions. Fortunately, Violet did find, but decided to leave her there so she could eavesdrop on Count Olaf and find out where the last safe place was. In this book, I liked how there were all these connections made from all the other books. They mysteries and questions they had also added to the mood . This book felt like a finishing book though. I think this because this book used the information of all the previous books. I enjoyed the feel of togetherness they had. An example of that would be when Klaus and Violet thought that they might be members of the VFD, just like their parents. Might have, when they found Sunny, the special bond and relationship between Violet and Quigley, etc. I also like how the end of this book seemed to say, To be continued. The reason I think that is because they never really talked about what happened when they reached the last safe place or if they actually reached there. I really hope Mr. Snicket will write the eleventh book continuing the story from this book. There wasn't anything I didn't like about this book. In my opinion, I think the book defines how strong and powerful a brother-sister relationship can be. This was clearly shown during the part where Violet and Quigley found Sunny. When they were about to leave, Violet didn't want to leave Sunny along with Count Olaf and his troupe again. She didn't want to get separated from Sunny because she was afraid that they might never see each other again. I was really able to feel what Violet felt because I have a little sister myself. Although we're not orphans, I still wouldn't want to separate from here, especially if she has a chance of being in danger at the moment. I think that Mr. Snicket was referring to himself and Beatrice when the book focused on the part when Violet and Quigley were going up the frozen waterfall, how they spoke, and the eye contact they gave to each other. Maybe that's the way Mr. Snicket and Beatrice got closer to each other. This book would be highly recommended for those who've read previous books, who likes mystery, and stories with a bit of depression.
Date published: 2005-06-22
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...none compares to the 10th... I have read all of The Series of Unfortunate Events books, but none compares to the 10th. Like the rest of the books in the series, Lemony Snicket reveals more and more about the Baudelaire orphans and their nemeses, Count Olaf. In the beginning of the book starts with Violet, the eldest Baudelaire, and Klaus, the middle child, in a run away caravan, while Sunny, the youngest orphan, is seated with Count Olaf and his troupe in his beat up car. The elder Baudelaire's slow down the caravan, taking what they can before they jump, and head up Mount Fraught in search for Count Olaf to retrieve their sister. As the elder Baudelaires make their way up the mountain, Sunny is forced to work for Count Olaf and sleep in a casserole dish. As Sunny desperately attempts to get away from the troupe of evil minions, Violet and Klaus run into no other than Carmelita Spats, who is a rude, violent, and filthy little girl. Carmelita and the Snow Scouts are also hiking up the mountain. Violet and Klaus join them and meet a friendly stranger who turns out to be the brother of their friends, Duncan and Isadora, Quigley Quagmire of the Quagmire triplets, whose parents also died in a fire like the Baudelaires. Quigley shows the Baudelaires the dismantled headquarters of V.F.D. that had been burned earlier by ˜a man with no hair but a beard and ˜a women with hair but no beard . Violet quickly thinks up an invention with forks and a candelabra, so they can reach the top of the waterfall and find who is at the top of the mountain. Klaus stays at the headquarters as Violet and Quigley make their way up the waterfall to find Sunny. Sunny stays with the villains to learn more about the last safe place. The Baudelaires and Quigley dig a trap for Esme to trade her for Sunny but never go through with it. More is revealed and the book ends with the two white faced women leaving Count Olaf's troupe and Carmelita Spats joining them, the Snow Scouts getting carried away by a bunch of eagles, and the orphans floating down Stricken Stream in hopes that they will soon see Quigley Quagmire again. I have always liked the way Mr. Snicket writes his stories and the way his imagination flows. He can explain detail very well to the reader and help to understand the story line better. The way he woes readers with the sorrow and depressing lives of the Baudelaires makes the adventures they endure that much more exciting. I wouldn't change anything in this book and I think that everyone can compare themselves to someone in these books. It might be Violet's keen intellect to invent, Klaus' knack for knowledge, or Sunny's unusually sharp but useful teeth. People of all ages can enjoy the fearful yet, exciting lives of the Baudelaires as it unfolds. -- Olivia Boyd, 14
Date published: 2005-06-22
Rated 5 out of 5 by from this book is it! Have you ever read a book so good that you can't put down? Even when your mom tells you to sleep you still hide it underneath your blankets? Well, this book is it! It's about three siblings, Violet, Klaus and Sunny. Their parents and died in a fire and they have been moving to live with different relatives that they barely know. Then there is Count Olaf, not your average bad guy that wants to take over the world, but one that has done things such as arson and murder, just to get the Baudlaires' fortune. This book in the series is one that is about Sunny being held captive by Count Olaf and Violet and Klaus are trying to find her. They meet a special person on the way. I was stuck onto reading this book. I really liked Violet. Strong, smart and a good role model for girls. She can invent things in a second. Violet had always taken care for her siblings and she is capable of outsmarting Count Olaf and his troupe. You might need to read the first nine books in the series. But time flies when you are reading this exciting adventure/mystery book. There might be some scary parts, but Violet, Klaus and Sunny will stick together and conquer it.
Date published: 2005-06-22
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...very good... The 9th book in the series is about Violet and Klaus traveling through the slippery slopes to rescue Sunny and get to the V.F.D. headquarters. Along the way they meet new and old characters like Bruce, Quigley and Carmelita Spats. The book was very good and very interesting. The book explains alot about V.F.D. and adds some new mysteries to the series. The one thing I would change about this book is the part where Carmelita Spats joins Count Olafs troup. I was hoping she would run away and join V.F.D. I would like to see Hector again since they're going to find him and his flying machine. This book would appeal most to people who like mysteries. My favourite part was when they went into the cave with the snow scouts. That was very cool. This book was very good and I can't wait till the next one comes out.
Date published: 2005-06-22
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...on the edge of my seat... I am not at all good at reviewing things so this will be very short! This book was really good and I have read all of Lemony Snickets books. I may be from an older crowd but it had me on the edge of my seat from beginning to end!
Date published: 2005-06-22
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Two Thumbs way up! Well it looks like Violet, Klaus and Sunny are back on their journey to find their parents. On their way they meet an old friend, a group of very annoying people and a great villain returns. Somehow he got his hands on Sunny and managed to kidnapped her. This is a book that really made me appreciate my parents. It sent a chill of mystery and intrigue down my spine. All in all you must read this book, it's simply the best!!
Date published: 2005-06-22
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...dilemmas and danger.... I thoroughly loved this book! It was captivating and intriguing throughout the novel. Lemony Snicket's style is different but delightful. As the series continues in The Slippery Slope the orphans face new dilemmas and danger. Anyone could enjoy this book, even if they haven't read any other book in the series.
Date published: 2005-06-22
Rated 5 out of 5 by from ...my FAVE author!! SUCH a good book!! I mean, Lemony Snicket is like my FAVE author!! If you're looking for a good read, try the series. this is the tenth book and I'm dying for the eleventh. It has a good plot, and it's consistent with the earlier books in the series. I rate this book a must have for teens who like mystery and adventure books.
Date published: 2005-06-22

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From Our Editors

Junior Booklovers Contest Winner Riley, age 13, Calgary, ABHere it is, Snicket fans: the longest book yet in the Series of Unfortunate Events. As followers of the series know, each book begins with the Baudelaire orphans, Violet, Klaus, and of course the youngest sibling, Sunny, heading to the residence of their next guardian. At the beginning of the series, the siblings learned of their parents' tragic demise in an inferno which decimated their home. Now, two are trapped in a trailer headed up a perilous mountainside, while the other sits in the lap of an evil criminal and self-proclaimed genius, Count Olaf. Littered with very dark, yet sometimes hilarious bits of humour, The Slippery Slope is a delicious read. Lemony Snicket has a very distinct and original style of writing that cannot be fairly compared with any other children's literature. Each book in the series has thirteen chapters, and Snicket says there will be thirteen books in the series. He defines words that may be unfamiliar to readers and uses extremely clever analogies that caused me to laugh out loud in many cases. Also, Sunny's dialogue, formerly just baby talk that only her siblings could comprehend, has evolved into real words, such as "Eureka" and "Lox", as well as some complete sentences. Nevertheless, the inanely ignorant Olaf still can't understand a word she is saying.I would not recommend the Series of Unfortunate Events to people who only enjoy books with happy endings; there is not a single title in the series that has that characteristic... yet. I can only hope the final tome will have an ending that could be considered cheerful. Additionally, I would not recommend reading The Slippery Slope before the rest of the series; the book refers to those preceding it numerous times, and may confuse readers when the characters start to discuss events that occurred in the second and third books. However, the entire series is brilliantly written and I would heartily recommend the books to almost anybody between the ages of ten and fourteen who enjoys a good mystery and black humour.