A Social History Of Wet Nursing In America: From Breast to Bottle by Janet GoldenA Social History Of Wet Nursing In America: From Breast to Bottle by Janet Golden

A Social History Of Wet Nursing In America: From Breast to Bottle

byJanet Golden

Hardcover | February 23, 1996

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A Social History of Wet Nursing in America: From Breast to Bottle examines the intersection of medical science, social theory, and cultural practices as they shaped relations among wet nurses, physicians, and families from the colonial period through the twentieth century. It explores how Americans used wet nursing to solve infant feeding problems, shows why wet nursing became controversial as motherhood slowly became medicalized, and elaborates how the development of scientific infant feeding eliminated wet nursing by the beginning of the twentieth century. Janet Golden's study contributes to our understanding of the cultural authority of medical science, the role of physicians in shaping child rearing practices, the social construction of motherhood, and the profound dilemmas of class and culture that played out in the private space of the nursery.
Title:A Social History Of Wet Nursing In America: From Breast to BottleFormat:HardcoverDimensions:232 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.67 inPublished:February 23, 1996Publisher:Cambridge University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:052149544X

ISBN - 13:9780521495448

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgements; Introduction; Chapter One, Public Discourse and Private Relations: Wet Nursing in Colonial America; Chapter Two, The New Motherhood and the New View of Wet Nurses, 1780-1865; Chapter Three, Finding 'just the right kind of woman': The Urban Wet Nurse Marketplace, 1830-1900; Chapter Four, 'Victims of Distressing Circumstances': The Wet Nurse Labor Force and the Offspring of Wet Nurses, 1860-1910; Chapter Five, Medical Oversight and Medical Dilemmas: The Physician and the Wet Nurse, 1870-1910; Chapter Six, 'Obliged to have wet nurses': Relations in the Private Household, 1870-1925; Chapter Seven, 'Therapeutic Merchandise': Human Milk in the Twentieth Century; Epilogue, From Commodity to Gift

From Our Editors

A Social History of Wet Nursing in America: From Breast to Bottle examines the intersection of medical science, social theory, and cultural practices as they shaped relations among wet nurses, physicians, and families from the colonial period through the twentieth century. It explores how Americans used wet nursing to solve infant-feeding problems in the eighteenth century, shows why wet nursing became controversial in the nineteenth century as motherhood slowly became medicalized, and elaborates how the development of scientific infant feeding eliminated wet nursing by the beginning of the twentieth century. Setting these changes in the context of women's history and the history of medicine, the book makes a significant contribution to our understanding of the cultural authority of medical science, the role of physicians in shaping child-rearing practices, the social construction of motherhood, and the profound dilemmas of class and culture that played out in the private space of the nursery.

Editorial Reviews

"One of the more interesting chapters in human history is that of the feeding of infants by breast or bottle [and] Golden has gone a long way in explaining this necessary aspect of human behavior in this well-written and fascinating book." Ray Browne, Journal of American Culture