A Sociology of Constitutions: Constitutions and State Legitimacy in Historical- Sociological Perspective by Chris ThornhillA Sociology of Constitutions: Constitutions and State Legitimacy in Historical- Sociological Perspective by Chris Thornhill

A Sociology of Constitutions: Constitutions and State Legitimacy in Historical- Sociological…

byChris Thornhill

Hardcover | August 22, 2011

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Using a methodology that both analyzes particular constitutional texts and theories and reconstructs their historical evolution, Chris Thornhill examines the social role and legitimating status of constitutions from the first quasi-constitutional documents of medieval Europe, through the classical period of revolutionary constitutionalism, to recent processes of constitutional transition. A Sociology of Constitutions explores the reasons why modern societies require constitutions and constitutional norms and presents a distinctive socio-normative analysis of the constitutional preconditions of political legitimacy.
Title:A Sociology of Constitutions: Constitutions and State Legitimacy in Historical- Sociological…Format:HardcoverProduct dimensions:466 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.98 inShipping dimensions:8.98 × 5.98 × 0.98 inPublished:August 22, 2011Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:052111621X

ISBN - 13:9780521116213

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Reviews

Table of Contents

1. Medieval constitutions; 2. Constitutions and early modernity; 3. States, rights and the revolutionary form of power; 4. Constitutions from Empire to Fascism; 5. Constitutions and democratic transitions.

Editorial Reviews

"This is an important book for those who seek to understand the sociological processes involved in the development of states and their constitutions. It has the great merit of offering considerable detail in support of its thesis and thus ample ammunition to challenge the many alternative theories of the development of the modern state."
- Richard Nobles, The Modern Law Review