A Toddlers Life: Becoming a Person

Paperback | March 1, 1995

byMarilyn Shatz

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What sets humans apart from other social animals? In an intimate account of child's development from age one to three, distinguished psychologist Marilyn Shatz answers this question by arguing that humans are unique in their ability to reflect on themselves, to compare themselves to others,and to self-correct. Language plays a central role in such processes because it offers the developing child a powerful tool for going beyond immediate experience to an understanding of unobservable states and motivations. In addition to her two decades of research in developmental psychology,Shatz draws on observations of her grandson Ricky to show how toddlers use their cognitive, social, and linguistic skills to understand and eventually to employ language as a means for successfully engaging others. Shatz expertly brings the dialogue of the toddler to life, plotting the turningpoints in Ricky's progress from fifteen-month-old one-word speaker to three-year-old articulate preschooler. The story of a child's increasingly sophisticated involvement with an expanding world is here generalized to other young children and skillfully interwoven with both empirical research andinsightful commentary about the nature of human learning in a social setting. Parents, teachers, researchers, and students of developmental psychology and psycholinguistics will find this book to be an interesting and engaging study of early developmental processes.

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From Our Editors

What sets humans apart from other social animals? In an intimate account of a child's development from age one to three, distinguished psychologist Marilyn Shatz answers this question by arguing that humans are unique in their ability to reflect on themselves, to compare themselves to others, and to self-correct. Language plays a centr...

From the Publisher

What sets humans apart from other social animals? In an intimate account of child's development from age one to three, distinguished psychologist Marilyn Shatz answers this question by arguing that humans are unique in their ability to reflect on themselves, to compare themselves to others,and to self-correct. Language plays a centra...

Marilyn Shatz is at University of Michigan.

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:240 pages, 6.26 × 9.25 × 0.59 inPublished:March 1, 1995Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195099230

ISBN - 13:9780195099232

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Table of Contents

Preface1. Introduction2. Age 15-16 Months: Doing a Lot with a Little3. Age 17-18 Months: Just One of the Family4. Age 19-20 Months: Emerging Skills5. Age 21-22 Months: Self Concept and Object Concepts6. Age 23-24 Months: Consequences of Self-Awareness7. Age 25-26 Months: Two-year-old Talk8. Age 27-28 Months: Talking About People and Talk9. Age 29-30 Months: Gaining Control over a Complex World10. Age 31-32 Months: Preparing for Second Order Thinking11. Age 33-34 Months: The Emergent Preschooler12. Age 35-36 Months: Preschooler Paradoxes13. The Path from Infancy to ChildhoodEpilogueReferences

From Our Editors

What sets humans apart from other social animals? In an intimate account of a child's development from age one to three, distinguished psychologist Marilyn Shatz answers this question by arguing that humans are unique in their ability to reflect on themselves, to compare themselves to others, and to self-correct. Language plays a central role in such processes because it offers the developing child a powerful tool for going beyond immediate experience to an understanding of unobservable states and motivations. In addition to her two decades of research in developmental psychology, Shatz draws on observations of her grandson Ricky to show how toddlers use their cognitive, social, and linguistic skills to understand and eventually to employ language as a means for successfully engaging others. Shatz expertly brings the dialogue of the toddler to life, plotting the turning points in Ricky's progress from fifteen-month-old one-word speaker to three-year-old articulate preschooler. The story of a child's increasingly sophisticated involvement with an expanding world is

Editorial Reviews

"A penetrating examination of a toddler's growth in cognition, social, and communication competence."--Choice