A Treatise On Logic, Or, The Laws Of Pure Thought; Comprising Both The Aristotelic And Hamiltonian…

Paperback | July 9, 2012

byFrancis Bowen

not yet rated|write a review
This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1874 edition. Excerpt: ...of the former which becomes the Subject of the latter. The Goclem'an Sorites is thus stated:--DisE, CisD, BisC, AisB;.-. A is E. Here, Extension is more prominent, as we start with the wider Terms; hence, this form is better suited for deduction. In the common form, Intension predominates, as the narrower Terms come first; Induction naturally assumes this Form. " A ' pretty quarrel' long existed amongst logicians," says Dr. Thomson, " which of the two was to be called progressive and which regressive. It was a mere strife about words. If we are discovering truth by the inductive method, the Aristotelian form is progressive; if we are teaching truth, or trying our laws upon new facts, we use deduction, and the Goclenian form is progressive. In an apt but familiar figure,--if I am on the ground floor, and wish to fetch something that is above, my going up stairs is my progress towards my object, and my coming down is a regression; if the positions of myself and the thing are reversed, going down would be progress, and returning up, regress. The inductive truth-seeker is on the ground-floor of facts, and goes up to seek a law; the deductive teacher is on a higher story, and carries his law down with him to the facts. " This will be clearer from a pair of examples. Goclenian or descending Sorites. Aristotelian or ascending Sorites. Sentient beings seek happiness; Caius is a man; All finite beings are sentient; All men are finite beings; All men are finite beings; All finite beings are sentient; Caius is a man; All sentient beings seek happiness; Therefore Caius seeks happi-Therefore Caius seeks happiness, ness." By way of recapitulation, the chief principles and rules of the Aristotelic doctrine of Syllogism are brought together in the following...

Pricing and Purchase Info

$31.95

Out of stock online

From the Publisher

This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1874 edition. Excerpt: ...of the former which becomes the Subject of the latter. The Goclem'an Sorites is thus stated:--DisE, CisD, BisC, AisB;.-...

Format:PaperbackDimensions:138 pages, 9.69 × 7.44 × 0.3 inPublished:July 9, 2012Publisher:General Books LLCLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0217430821

ISBN - 13:9780217430821

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of A Treatise On Logic, Or, The Laws Of Pure Thought; Comprising Both The Aristotelic And Hamiltonian Analyses Of Logical Forms, And Some Chapters Of App

Reviews