A Visual Astronomer's Photographic Guide to the Deep Sky: A Pocket Field Guide by Stefan RumistrzewiczA Visual Astronomer's Photographic Guide to the Deep Sky: A Pocket Field Guide by Stefan Rumistrzewicz

A Visual Astronomer's Photographic Guide to the Deep Sky: A Pocket Field Guide

byStefan Rumistrzewicz

Paperback | November 1, 2010

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Over the last 15 years or so there has been a huge increase in the popularity of astrophotography with the advent of digital SLR cameras and CCD imagers. These have enabled astronomers to take many images and, indeed, check images as they scan the skies. Processing techniques using computer software have also made 'developing' these images more accessible to those of us who are 'chemically challenged!' And let's face it - some of the pictures you see these days in magazines, books, and on popular web forums are, frankly, amazing! So, why bother looking through the eyepiece you ask? Well, for one thing, setting up the equipment is quicker. You just take your 'scope out of the garage or, if you're lucky enough to own one, open the roof of your observatory, align the 'scope and off you go. If you have an equatorial mount, you'll still need to roughly polar align, but this really takes only a few moments. The 'imager' would most likely need to spend more time setting up. This would include very accurate polar alignment (for equatorial mounts), then finding a guide star using his or her finder, checking the software is functioning properly, and c- tinuous monitoring to make sure the alignment is absolutely precise throu- out the imaging run. That said, an imager with a snug 'obsy' at the end of the garden will have a quicker time setting up, but then again so will the 'visual' observer.
My love affair with the cosmos began, probably, when I stared, open-jawed, for two hours at the film Star Wars. Although I was only three at the time, I can remember subsequently drawing pictures of stars and planets and 'X-wings.' I quickly became a science fiction addict, watching re-runs of Star Trek and various other series. And so...
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Title:A Visual Astronomer's Photographic Guide to the Deep Sky: A Pocket Field GuideFormat:PaperbackDimensions:344 pagesPublished:November 1, 2010Publisher:Springer-Verlag/Sci-Tech/TradeLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1441972412

ISBN - 13:9781441972415

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Table of Contents

Observing Plans and Techniques.- Accessories and 'Pimping' Your 'Scope.- Sketching.- Constellation Observing Lists and Photos.- Observation Records.