A World History of Photography by Naomi RosenblumA World History of Photography by Naomi Rosenblum

A World History of Photography

byNaomi Rosenblum

Paperback | January 29, 2008

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From the camera lucida to the latest in digital image making and computer manipulation, photographic technology has dramatically changed throughout its nearly 200-year history, as succinctly explained and powerfully illustrated inA World History of Photography. Thanks to the unique immediacy with which photography captures perspective and history, the popularity and use of the camera spread rapidly around the globe. Today, photography is ubiquitous: from newspapers and fashion magazines to billboards and the film industry, cultures worldwide have embraced this malleable artistic medium for a limitless variety of purposes.

Naomi Rosenblum’s classic text investigates all aspects of photography #151; aesthetic, documentary, commercial, and technical #151; while placing photos in their historical context. Included among the more than 800 photographs by men and women are both little-known and celebrated masterpieces, arranged in stimulating juxtapositions that illuminate their visual power. Authoritative and unbiased, Rosenblum’s chronicle of photography both chronologically and thematically traces the evolution of this still-young art form. Exploring the diverse roles that photography has played in the communication of ideas, Rosenblum devotes special attention to topics such as portraiture, documentation, advertising, and photojournalism, and to the camera as a means of personal artistic expression. The revised fourth edition includes updates on technical advances as well as a new chapter on contemporary photographers. Armed with the expressive vigor of its images, this thorough and accessible volume will appeal to all.
Naomi Rosenblum, an independent curator and scholar who has written many articles and lectured extensively on a range of subjects in photography, first publishedA World History of Photographyin 1984. The book has since been translated into French, Japanese, Polish, and Chinese, and it has been updated and expanded through many editions...
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Title:A World History of PhotographyFormat:PaperbackDimensions:712 pages, 11.5 × 8.75 × 1.47 inPublished:January 29, 2008Publisher:Abbeville Publishing GroupLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0789209373

ISBN - 13:9780789209375

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1. THE EARLY YEARS: TECHNOLOGY, VISION, USERS 1839–1875What is the secret of the invention? What is the substance endowed with such astonishing sensibility to the rays of light, that is not only penetrates itself with them, but preserves their impression; performs at once the function of the eye and the optic nerve—the material instrument of sensation and sensation itself?—“Photogenic Drawing,” 1839In the year 1839, two remarkable processes that would revolutionize our perceptions of reality were announced separately in London and Paris; both represented responses to the challenge of permanently capturing the fleeting images reflected into the camera obscura. The two systems involved the application of long-recognized optical and chemical principles, but aside from this they were only superficially related. The outcome of one process was a unique, unduplicatable, laterally reversed monochrome picture on a metal plate that was called a daguerreotype after one of its inventors, Louis Jacques Mande Daguerre (pl. no. 1) (see Profile). The other system produced an image on paper that was also monochromatic and tonally as well as laterally reversed—a negative. When placed in contact with another chemically treated surface and exposed to sunlight, the negative image was transferred in reverse, resulting in a picture with normal spatial and tonal values. The result of this procedure was called photogenic drawing and evolved into the calotype, or Talbotype, named after its inventor, William Henry Fox Talbot (pl. no. 2) (see Profile). For reasons to be examined later in the chapter, Talbot’s negative-positive process initially was less popular than Daguerre’s unique picture on metal, but it was Talbot’s system that provided the basis for all substantive developments in photography before the advent of digital images.By the time it was announced in 1839, Western industrialized society was ready for photography. The camera’s images appeared and remained viable because they filled cultural and sociological needs that were not being met by pictures created by hand. The photograph was the ultimate response to a social and cultural appetite for a more accurate and real-looking representation of reality, a need that had its origins in the Renaissance. When the idealized representations of the spiritual universe that inspired the medieval mind no longer served the purposes of increasingly secular societies, their places were taken by paintings and graphic works that portrayed actuality with greater verisimilitude. To render buildings, topography, and figures accurately and in correct proportion, and to suggest objects and figures in spatial relationships as seen by the eye rather than the mind, 15th-century painters devised a system of perspective drawing as well as an optical device called the camera obscura that projected distant scenes onto a flat surface (see A Short Technical History, Part I)—both means remained in use until well into the 19th century.Realistic depiction in the visual arts was stimulated and assisted also by the climate of scientific inquiry that had emerged in the 16th century and was supported by the middle class during the Enlightenment and the Industrial Revolution of the late 18th century. Investigations into plant and animal life on the part of anatomists, botanists, and physiologists resulted in a body of knowledge concerning the internal structure as well as superficial appearance of living things, improving artists’ capacity to portray organisms credibly. As physical scientists explored aspects of heat, light, and the solar spectrum, painters became increasingly aware of the visual effects of weather conditions.

Table of Contents

Preface 9

1. THE EARLY YEARS: TECHNOLOGY, VISION, USERS 1839–1875 14
2. A PLENITUDE OF PORTRAITS 1839–1890 38
The Galerie Contemporaine#151;Appearance and Character in 19th-Century Portraiture 84
3. DOCUMENTATION: LANDSCAPE AND ARCHITECTURE 1839–1890
The Western Landscape#151;Natural and Fabricated 144
4. DOCUMENTATION: OBJECTS AND EVENTS 1839–1890 154
A Short Technical History: Part 1 192
A 19th-Century Forerunner of Photojournalism#151;The Execution of the Lincoln Conspirators 200
5. PHOTOGRAPHY AND ART: THE FIRST PHASE 1839–1890 208
6. NEW TECHNOLOGY, NEW VISION, NEW USERS 1875–1925 244
The Origins of Color in Camera Images 280
7. ART PHOTOGRAPHY: ANOTHER ASPECT 1890&ndash:1920 296
8. DOCUMENTATION: THE SOCIAL SCENE to 1945
Illuminating Injustice: The Camera and Social Issues 384
9. ART, PHOTOGRAPHY, AND MODERNISM 1920–1945 392
A Short Technical History: Part II 442
The Machine: Icons of the Industrial Ethos 454
10. WORDS AND PICTURES: PHOTOGRAPHS IN PRINT MEDIA 1920–1980 462
11. PHOTOGRAPHY SINCE 1950: THE STRAIGHT IMAGE 516
12. PHOTOGRAPHY SINCE 1950: MANIPULATIONS AND COLOR 570
A Short Technical History: Part III 630
Afterword 639
Notes 642
A Photography Time Line 655
Glossary 661
Bibliography 666
Index 684

Editorial Reviews

"Now, if you want a remarkable run-down on the entire phenomenon [of photography], from the earliest beginnings to the present day ... you couldn't do better to get it all, compactly and comprehensively, than in this exceptional book." —Art Matters"An important up-to-date addition to photographic literature, which lacks such works of erudition." —Cornell Capa, Founder, International Center of Photography"A strong resource on the evolution of artistic form and composition in photography, this book is flawless in its annotation and analysis....Libraries that do not own this work should consider purchasing it." —Choice