A Writer's Workshop: Crafting Sentences, Building Paragraphs: Crafting Sentences, Building…

Paperback | January 6, 2009

byBob Brannan

not yet rated|write a review
This two-book developmental writing series engages using with its environmental theme. A Writer’s Workshop: Crafting Sentences, Building Paragraphs engages developing writers with a hands-on, process-oriented, collaborative, and conscientious approach to writing, treating students as writers and writing as a dynamic process. Throughout, this text offers sound connections between its lessons and students’ existing knowledge. It also explores why we study each writing skill and process, linking lessons to future application in the classroom and beyond.

Pricing and Purchase Info

$138.95

Out of stock online

From the Publisher

This two-book developmental writing series engages using with its environmental theme. A Writer’s Workshop: Crafting Sentences, Building Paragraphs engages developing writers with a hands-on, process-oriented, collaborative, and conscientious approach to writing, treating students as writers and writing as a dynamic process. Throughou...

Format:PaperbackDimensions:608 pages, 10.8 × 8.5 × 1 inPublished:January 6, 2009Publisher:McGraw-Hill EducationLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0073385719

ISBN - 13:9780073385716

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of A Writer's Workshop: Crafting Sentences, Building Paragraphs: Crafting Sentences, Building Paragraphs

Reviews

Extra Content

Table of Contents

A Writer's Workshop: Crafting Sentences, Building Paragraphs

About the Author

Preface: About This Book

UNIT ONE: PREPARING FOR SUCCESS

Chapter 1: The Writing Process

How Do We Begin to Write?

What to Ask at the Start of a Writing Project

STEPS IN THE WRITING PROCESS

Discovering Ideas: Prewriting

Conservation in Context: Keep a Paperless Journal or Blog

Organizing Ideas

Drafting

Conservation in Context: Try Paperless

Drafting

Revising

Revision Priority Checklist

Collaborative Revising

Editing

Proofreading

STUDENT MODEL: "The Trail of Blood" by Kyle Burnett

Diagnostic Writing Assignments

Chapter Summary

Chapter 2: The Reading Process

Is There a More Effective Way to Read?

Prereading: Preparing to Understand

Connections: Linking New to Previous Knowledge

Reading: Processing Ideas

Linking New to Previous Knowledge

Reading: Focusing and Recording Main Ideas

Conservation in Context: Take Green Notes

Postreading: Retaining Ideas

Chapter Summary

UNIT TWO: CRAFTING SENTENCES: UNDERSTANDING HOW THEY WORK

Chapter 3: Subjects, Verbs, and Other Sentence Parts

What Are We Trying to Achieve and Why?

Identifying the Parts of Speech

Recognizing Verbs and Subjects in Simple Sentences

Identifying Verbs

Recognizing Subjects

Conservation in Context: Identifying Subjects and Verbs in Context

Chapter Summary

Chapter 4: Verbs: Forms and Tenses

What Are We Trying to Achieve and Why?

Present Tense

Past Tense

Future Tense

Helping Verbs

Common Helping Verbs

Modals

Perfect Tenses

Progressive Tenses

Irregular Verbs

Verb Tense Sequences and Unneeded Tense Shifts

Chapter Summary

Chapter 5: Subject-Verb Agreement

What Are We Trying to Achieve and Why?

Intervening Words

Verbals: Incomplete Verbs

Compound Subjects

Indefinite Pronouns

Or, Either/Or, Neither/Nor

Relative Pronouns as Subjects

Linking Verbs

Changing the Order of Subjects and Verbs

Collective, Plural, and "False Plural" Nouns with Verbs

Chapter Summary

Chapter 6: Nouns

What Are We Trying to Achieve and Why?

What a Noun Looks Like

Kinds of Nouns

How Nouns Function

Problem Nouns

Chapter Summary

Chapter 7: Pronouns

What Are We Trying to Achieve and Why?

Referring to the Antecedent

Agreeing in Number with the Antecedent

Choosing Proper Pronoun Case

Solving Common Problems with Pronoun Case

Remaining Consistent in Person

Chapter Summary

Chapter 8: Adjectives and Adverbs

What Are We Trying to Achieve and Why?

Adjectives

Comparative and Superlative Forms

Adverbs

Irregular Adjective and Adverb Forms

Overuse of Modifiers

Dangling and Misplaced Modifiers

Chapter Summary

Chapter 9: Conjunctions and Prepositions

What Are We Trying to Achieve and Why?

Conjunctions

Prepositions

Chapter Summary

Chapter 10: Phrases

What Are We Trying to Achieve and Why?

Prepositional Phrases

Infinitive Phrases

Participial Phrases

Gerund Phrases

Absolute Phrases

Appositive Phrases

Chapter Summary

Chapter 11: Clauses and Sentence Types

Clauses

Main Clauses

Subordinate Clauses

Sentence Types

Simple

Compound

Complex

Compound-complex

Summary: A Writer's Basic Sentence Grammar

Chapter 12: Coordination and Subordination

What Are We Trying to Achieve and Why?

Coordination

Coordinating Words

Coordinating Phrases

Coordinating Clauses

Avoiding Excessive Coordination

Subordination

Subordinating Words

Subordinating Phrases

Using Adverb Clauses

Using Adjective Clauses

Avoiding Excessive Subordination

Chapter Summary

Chapter 13: Parallelism

Making Series Parallel

Making Lists and Outlines Parallel

Making Pairs Parallel

Chapter Summary

UNIT THREE: DEALING WITH COMMON SENTENCE PROBLEMS

Chapter 14: Run-ons, Comma Splices, and Sentence Fragments

What Are We Trying to Achieve and Why?

Run-on Sentences and Comma Splices

Conservation in Context: Use Workbook Lines

Sentence Fragments

Chapter Summary

Chapter 15: Commas

What Are We Trying to Achieve and Why?

The Big Three Comma Categories

Introducing Main Clauses

Setting Off Nonessential Word Groups

Dividing Main Clauses

Secondary Comma Categories

Avoiding Unneeded Commas

Chapter Summary

Chapter 16: Other Punctuation and Mechanics

Semicolon

Colon

Dash

Parentheses

Quotation Marks

Apostrophe

Capitalization

Hyphen

Underlining and Italicizing

Chapter Summary

Chapter 17: Spelling and Sound-alike Words

What Are We Trying to Achieve and Why?

Some Suggestions for Help with Spelling

A Review of Vowels and Consonants

Some Useful Spelling Patterns

Sound-alike Words

Chapter Summary

Chapter 18: ELL Concerns

What Are We Trying to Achieve and Why?

Count and Noncount Nouns

Articles

Verbs

Prepositions

Adjective Order

Chapter Summary

UNIT FOUR: BUILDING PARAGRAPHS

Chapter 19: Introducing the Paragraph

What Is a Paragraph?

Writing a Topic Sentence

Developing Body Paragraphs

STUDENT MODEL: "My Hyperactive Dog" by Phonepraseut Mounivong

Writing a Concluding Sentence

STUDENT MODEL: "Staying Fit" by Hyuk Sun

Organizing Body Paragraphs

Conservation in Context: Organize Paragraphs On-screen

Choosing a Title

Chapter Summary

Chapter 20: Revising Paragraphs

The Revision Process

First Draft

Second Draft

Final Draft

Proofreading

STUDENT MODEL: "Ouch" by Crystal Lockner

Conservation in Context: "Track" Your Edits

Chapter Summary

Chapter 21: Describing a Place (Description)

What Are We Trying to Achieve and Why?

Linking to Previous Experience: What You Already Know about Description

Developing Skills in Describing

Learning from a Student Model: A Descriptive Paragraph

STUDENT MODEL: "A World Full of Fun" by Kamiasha Moses

Writing a Descriptive Paragraph

Conservation in Context: Describe a local public outdoor space . . .

Alternate Assignments

Linking to Future Experience

Chapter Summary

Chapter 22: Telling a Story (Narration)

What Are We Trying to Achieve and Why?

Linking to Previous Experience: What You Already Know about Telling Stories

Developing Skills in Narrating

STUDENT MODEL: "Close Call" by Andrew Lucht

Learning from a Student Model: A Narrative Paragraph

STUDENT MODEL: "The Chase" by Brian Rodriguez

Writing a Narrative Paragraph

Conservation in Context: Tell a story about a moment you felt connected to the natural world (or separated from it).

Alternate Assignments

Linking to Future Experience

Chapter Summary

Chapter 23: Writing with Examples (Illustration)

What Are We Trying to Achieve and Why?

Linking to Previous Experience: What You Already Know about Using Examples

Developing Skills in Using Examples

STUDENT MODEL: "The Sharks of Steel" by Mikel King

Learning from a Student Model: An Illustration Paragraph

STUDENT MODEL: "Another Way to Ruin My Day" by Nalin Weerasekara

Writing an Illustration Paragraph

Conservation in Context: Illustrate the ways in which you show environmental awareness (or wish you did).

Conservation in Context: What are ways in which your campus shows a commitment to conservation?

Alternate Assignments

Linking to Future Experience

Chapter Summary

Chapter 24: Discovering Causes and Effects

What Are We Trying to Achieve and Why?

Linking to Previous Experience: What You Already Know about Causes and Effects

Developing Skills in Working with Causes and Effects

STUDENT MODEL: "Missing the Target" by Daniel Hedge

Learning from a Student Model: An Effects Paragraph

STUDENT MODEL: "Hurray for America!" by Takako Kurokami

Writing a Causes or Effects Paragraph

Alternate Assignments

Conservation in Context: Build a chain of causes or effects of global climate change . . .

Linking to Future Experience

Chapter Summary

Chapter 25: Explaining How to Do and Understand Processes

What Are We Trying to Achieve and Why?

Linking to Previous Experience: What You Already Know about Process

Explanations

Developing Skills in Working with Process Explanations

STUDENT MODEL: "Tsunamis, the Killer Waves" by Aasim Alhussani

Learning from a Student Model: A Process Paragraph

STUDENT MODEL: "Sharing with Family" by YanZheng Bai

Writing a Process Explanation Paragraph

Conservation in Context: Write a paragraph explaining how to calculate or reduce your carbon footprint . . .

Alternate Assignments

Linking to Future Experience

Chapter Summary

Chapter 26: Exploring Similarities and Differences (Comparison and Contrast)

What Are We Trying to Achieve and Why?

Linking to Previous Experience: What You Already Know about Comparing and Contrasting

Developing Skills in Comparing and Contrasting

STUDENT MODEL: "A Way of Life" by Shane Smith

Learning from a Student Model: A Contrast Paragraph

STUDENT MODEL: "Worlds Apart" by Katherine Priest

Writing a Comparison or Contrast Paragraph

Conservation in Context: Compare or contrast two outdoor activities, two natural spaces, or an outdoor space and an indoor space.

Conservation in Context: Compare or contrast your attitude toward conservation with that of a classmate, friend, parent, teacher, or celebrity.

Alternate Assignments

Linking to Future Experience

Chapter Summary

Chapter 27: Creating and Explaining Groups (Classification)

What Are We Trying to Achieve and Why?

Linking to Previous Experience: What You Already Know about Classifying

Developing Skills in Classifying

STUDENT MODEL: "Ukrainian Holiday" by Sergey Kobzar

Learning from a Student Model: A Classification Paragraph

STUDENT MODEL: "Cowboys" by Billy Higgins

Writing a Classification Paragraph

Alternate Assignments

Conservation in Context: Write a paragraph that addresses and classifiesaspects of (or solutions to) an environmental issue. For example . . .

Linking to Future Experience

Chapter Summary

Chapter 28: Defining Terms (Definition)

What are We Trying to Achieve and Why?

Linking to Previous Experience: What You Already Know about Defining

Developing Skills in Defining

STUDENT MODEL: "Explorers: Searching for a Better Life" by Jhonnatan Percca

Learning from a Student Model: An Extended Definition

Paragraph

STUDENT MODEL: "Escaping the Darkness" by Cynthia Urlocker

Writing an Extended Definition Paragraph

Alternate Assignments

Conservation in Context: Write an extended definition of an environmental topic. Consider the following terms: endangered species, global warming, reef bleaching, acid rain, mountain-top mining . . .

Linking to Future Experience

Chapter Summary

Chapter 29: Writing Persuasively (Argument)

What Are We Trying to Achieve and Why?

inking to Previous Experience: What You Already Know about Persuasion

Developing Skills in Persuasive Writing

STUDENT MODEL: "Wanted: Housewives and Other Career Professionals" byAmy Myers

Learning from a Student Model: A Persuasive Paragraph

STUDENT MODEL: "The Right to Die with Dignity" by Erin Berg

Writing a Persuasive Paragraph

Alternate Assignments

Conservation in Context: Write an argument that deals with a larger environmental issue like global climate change, air or water pollution, species extinction, habitat destruction . . .

Conservation in Context: Decide on a simple energy-saving measure and promote it to a friend or family member . . .

Linking to Future Experience

Chapter Summary

UNIT FIVE: INTRODUCING THE ESSAY

Chapter 30: Developing Essays from Paragraphs

Defining the Essay

Linking to Previous Experience: Transitioning from Paragraph to Essay

STUDENT MODEL (PARAGRAPH): "The Sharks of Steel" by Mikel King

STUDENT MODEL (ESSAY): "The Sharks of Steel" by Mikel King

Writing Introductory Paragraphs

Writing Body Paragraphs

Writing Concluding Paragraphs

Conservation in Context: Choose Recycled Paper

Creating Coherence

Selecting a Title

Linking to Future Experience

Chapter Summary

Chapter 31: Model Student Essays

What Are We Trying to Achieve and Why?

Description

STUDENT MODEL: "Back to the Garden" by Michael Wolfe

Narration

STUDENT MODEL: "I Thought I Could" by Hannah Barnes

Illustration (Using Examples)

STUDENT MODEL: "Fear in My Early Years" by Yunkyung Clare Bae

Cause-and-Effect

STUDENT MODEL: "Driven to Drive in Midlife" by Nahid Talebizadeh

Process Description

STUDENT MODEL: "Learn to Clean" by Nalin Weerasekara

Comparison-Contrast

STUDENT MODEL: "Under Attack" by Erin Stanley

Classification

STUDENT MODEL: "Making the Most of Reading" by Esther Cho

Definition

STUDENT MODEL: "Arowana" by Phonepraseut Mounivong

Persuasion

STUDENT MODEL: "He Was My Friend" by Katie Sturgeon

Working Online

Conservation in Context: Expand Your Conservation-

Themed Paragraph into an Essay

UNIT SIX: POLISHING STYLE

Chapter 32: Varying Sentences

What Are We Trying to Achieve and Why?

Varying the Length of Sentences

Varying the Type of Sentences

Working with Functional Sentence Types

Varying the Beginnings of Sentences

Inverting Sentences

Conservation in Context: Sentence Variety

Chapter Summary

Chapter 33: Choosing Effective Words

What Are We Trying to Achieve and Why?

Using Specific and Concrete Language

Writing Concisely

Choosing Language for Tone

Conservation in Context: Word Choice

Chapter Summary

UNIT SEVEN: LEARNING FROM PROFESSIONAL READINGS

Linking to Previous and Future Experience: Why Reading Professional Models Is Useful

Description

"Guavas" by Esmeralda Santiago

"Heaven and Earth in Jest" by Annie Dillard

Narration

"Salvation" by Langston Hughes

"The Struggle to Be an All-American Girl" by Elizabeth Wong

"The Heroes the Healing: Military Medicine from the Front Lines to the Home Front" by Neil Shea

Illustration

"English Is a Crazy Language" by Richard Lederer

"What Really Scares Us?" by David Ropeik

Cause and Effect

"Insight: Overfishing Is Creating a Jellyfish Plague" by Debora Mackenzie

"Gilded Age, Gilded Cage" by Leslie T. Chang

Process Description

"How to Surf" by Santa Barbara Surfing

"Earth in the Beginning" (with photo essay)

Comparison and Contrast

"Patriotism or Nationalism" by Joseph Sobran

"Spider-Man 2 Movie Review: Rami Snares Us in His Web Once More" by Rebecca Murray

Classification

"Doublespeak" by William Lutz

"A Healthy Drink? Try Plain Water" by Temma Ehrenfeld

Definition

"Ambition" by Perri Klass

"Instant Expert: Climate Change" by Fred Pearce

Persuasion

"Nobel Lecture 2007" by Al Gore

"The Semantics of Murder" by Amir Taheri

Credits

Index

Abbreviations and Symbols for Revising and Editing Your Writing

Improvement Chart

Conservation Checklist