Abel's Theorem in Problems and Solutions: Based on the lectures of Professor V.I. Arnold by Francesca AicardiAbel's Theorem in Problems and Solutions: Based on the lectures of Professor V.I. Arnold by Francesca Aicardi

Abel's Theorem in Problems and Solutions: Based on the lectures of Professor V.I. Arnold

Translated byFrancesca Aicardi

Paperback | December 1, 2010

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Do formulas exist for the solution to algebraical equations in one variable of any degree like the formulas for quadratic equations? The main aim of this book is to give new geometrical proof of Abel's theorem, as proposed by Professor V.I. Arnold. The theorem states that for general algebraical equations of a degree higher than 4, there are no formulas representing roots of these equations in terms of coefficients with only arithmetic operations and radicals. A secondary, and more important aim of this book, is to acquaint the reader with two very important branches of modern mathematics: group theory and theory of functions of a complex variable. This book also has the added bonus of an extensive appendix devoted to the differential Galois theory, written by Professor A.G. Khovanskii. As this text has been written assuming no specialist prior knowledge and is composed of definitions, examples, problems and solutions, it is suitable for self-study or teaching students of mathematics, from high school to graduate.
Title:Abel's Theorem in Problems and Solutions: Based on the lectures of Professor V.I. ArnoldFormat:PaperbackDimensions:283 pages, 10 × 7.01 × 0.01 inPublished:December 1, 2010Publisher:Springer NetherlandsLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:9048166098

ISBN - 13:9789048166091

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Table of Contents

Preface for the English edition; V.I. Arnold. Preface. Introduction. 1: Groups. 1.1. Examples. 1.2. Groups of transformations. 1.3. Groups. 1.4. Cyclic groups. 1.5. Isomorphisms. 1.6. Subgroups. 1.7. Direct product. 1.8. Cosets. Lagrange's theory. 1.9. Internal automorphisms. 1.10. Normal subgroups. 1.11. Quotient groups. 1.12. Commutant. 1.13. Homomorphisms. 1.14. Soluble groups. 1.15. Permutations. 2: The complex numbers. 2.1. Fields and polynomials. 2.2. The field of complex numbers. 2.3. Uniqueness of the field of complex numbers. 2.4. Geometrical descriptions of the field of complex numbers. 2.5. The trigonometric form of the complex numbers. 2.6. Continuity. 2.7. Continuous curves. 2.8. Images of curves: the basic theorem of the algebra of complex numbers. 2.9. The Riemann surface of the function w = SQRTz. 2.10. The Riemann surfaces of more complicated functions. 2.11. Functions representable by radicals. 2.12. Monodromy groups of multi-valued functions. 2.13. Monodromy groups of functions representable by radicals. 2.14. The Abel theorem. 3: Hints, Solutions and Answers. 3.1.Problems of Chapter 1. 3.2. Problems of Chapter 2. Drawings of Riemann surfaces; F. Aicardi. Appendix. Solvability of equations by explicit formulae; A. Khovanskii. A.1. Explicit solvability of equations. A.2. Liouville's theory. A.3. Picard-Vessiot's theory. A.4. Topological obstructions for the representation of functions by quadratures. A.5. S-functions. A.6. Monodromy group. A.7. Obstructions for the representability of functions by quadratures. A.8. Solvability of algebraic equations. A.9. The monodromy pair. A.10. Mapping of the semi-plane to a polygon bounded by arcs of circles. A.11. Topological obstructions for the solvability of differential equations. A.12. Algebraic functions of several variables. A.13. Functions of several complex variables representable by quadratures and generalized quadratures. A.14. SC-germs. A.15. Topological obstruction for the solvability of the holonomic systems of linear differential equations. A.16. Topological obstruction for the solvability of the holonomic systems of linear differential equations. Bibliography. Appendix; V.I. Arnold. Index.

Editorial Reviews

From the reviews:"This very special and brilliant text has been written for bright non-specialists in mathematics, but it leads the reader up to topical research problems in the field, and that in a masterly manner. The book is absolutely self-contained, in its own particular fashion, and it is therefore perfectly suited for self-study, ranging from advanced high school to graduate level. No doubt, the thorough and serious working with this outstanding text could turn very beginners into creative almost-experts in the field." (Werner Kleinert, Zentralblatt MATH, Vol. 1065 (16), 2005)