Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Paperback | May 14, 2001

byMark Twain

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Climb aboard the raft with Huck and Jim and drift away from the "sivilized" life and into a world of adventure, excitement, danger, and self-discovery. Huck's shrewd and humorous narrative is complemented by lyrical descriptions of the Mississippi valley and a sparkling cast of memorable characters. Large print edition.

From the Publisher

Climb aboard the raft with Huck and Jim and drift away from the "sivilized" life and into a world of adventure, excitement, danger, and self-discovery. Huck's shrewd and humorous narrative is complemented by lyrical descriptions of the Mississippi valley and a sparkling cast of memorable characters. Large print edition.

Samuel Clemens - steamboat pilot, prospector, and newspaper reporter - adopted the pen name "Mark Twain" when he began his career as a literary humorist. The pen name - a river's pilot's term meaning "two fathoms deep" or "safe water" - appears to have freed Clemens to develop the humorous, deadpan manner that became his trademark. Dur...

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:400 pages, 9.25 × 6 × 0.68 inPublished:May 14, 2001Publisher:Dover PublicationsLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0486417808

ISBN - 13:9780486417806

Appropriate for ages: 9 - 12

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Customer Reviews of Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from Absolutely great #plumreview A true American classic that shows America, warts and all, with a deftness, humour and childlike vision unlike pretty much any other writer.
Date published: 2016-11-16
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Nicely printed, basic copy. Important piece of history. Never let the original version die. Down with censorship, especially when the subject matter is difficult to swallow. That makes it all the more important for people not to put their head in the sand. Those who don't learn from history are doomed to repeat it.
Date published: 2016-08-26
Rated 1 out of 5 by from So boring It was probably the most boring book I've ever read
Date published: 2015-09-21
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A classic There's a reason this book is a classic, it's arguably one of the greatest novels. It deals with sensitive but important issues such as slavery, and discrimination as well as life circumstances like building friendships and maturing. This truly is a book that everyone should read and experience, I highly recommend it. Another great adventurous book from Mark Twain and I expected nothing less.
Date published: 2011-01-10
Rated 2 out of 5 by from eeh, not great this book was not the greatest, it was hard to understand at times esp. when jim spoke.
Date published: 2009-11-22
Rated 3 out of 5 by from A Classic Adventure Narrated by a poor, illiterate white boy living in America's deep South before the Civil War, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is the story of Huck's escape from his brutal father and the relationship that grows between him and Jim, the slave who is fleeing from an even more brutal oppression. As they journey down the Mississippi their adventures address some of the most profound human conundrums: the prejudices of class, age, and colour are pitted against the qualities of hope, courage, and moral character. Classics always have a certain amount of hype and I had been intending to read this book for some time. Of course the writing is a little difficult to adjust to, but not because of the age of the book, but because of the dialects in which the characters speak. Twain chose to use the local vernacular that black slaves used for his runaway slave Jim. Although it is true to that time in history, it is striking how the characters speak and the words they use, which were in common usage in those days. I like how Twain chose to not sanitize the realities of that society, particularly racism. As I was reading I was constantly thinking that this story seemed like a fantasy. As if Huck was playing in his back yard and imagining that all these fanciful adventures were really happening. Now I don’t know if that’s what Twain intended, but that is how it came across to me. At the same time I couldn’t help but feel a measure of pity for Huckleberry Finn and Jim, two people with nowhere to go and no one to trust. But for those who have read it know that’s what makes the end satisfying. Story *** Characters *** Readability *** Overall rating ***
Date published: 2009-10-26