Adversarial versus Inquisitorial Justice: Psychological Perspectives on Criminal Justice Systems by Peter J. Van KoppenAdversarial versus Inquisitorial Justice: Psychological Perspectives on Criminal Justice Systems by Peter J. Van Koppen

Adversarial versus Inquisitorial Justice: Psychological Perspectives on Criminal Justice Systems

byPeter J. Van KoppenEditorSteven D. Penrod

Paperback | September 25, 2012

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This is the first volume that directly compares the practices of adversarial and inquisitorial systems of law from a psychological perspective. It aims at understanding why American and European continental systems differ so much, while both systems entertain much support in their communities. The book is written for advanced audiences in psychology and law.

Title:Adversarial versus Inquisitorial Justice: Psychological Perspectives on Criminal Justice SystemsFormat:PaperbackDimensions:437 pagesPublished:September 25, 2012Publisher:Springer-Verlag/Sci-Tech/TradeLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1461348323

ISBN - 13:9781461348320

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Table of Contents

About the Editors. About the Authors. 1. Adversarial or Inquisitorial: Comparing Systems; P.J. van Koppen, S.D. Penrod. 2. Adversarial or Inquisitorial: Do we Have a Choice? H.F.M. Crombag. 3. An Empirically Based Comparison of American and European Regulatory Approaches to Police Investigation; C. Slobogin. 4. 'We Will Protect Your Wife and Child, but only if You Confess': Police Interrogations in England and the Netherlands; A. Vrij. 5. Violence Risk Assessments in American Law; J. Monahan. 6. The Dual Nature of Forensic Psychiatric Practice: Risk Assessment and Management under the Dutch TBS-Order; C. de Ruiter, M. Hildebrand. 7. The Death Penalty and Adversarial Justice in the United States; S.R. Gross. 8. Taking Recovered Memories to Court; H. Merckelbach. 9. Adversarial Influences on the Interrogation of Trial Witnesses; R.C. Park. 10. Children in Court; I.M. Cordon, et al. 11. Identification Evidence in Germany and in the US: Common Sense Assumptions, Empirical Evidence, Guidelines, and Judicial Practices; S.L. Sporer, B.L. Cutler. 12. Expert Evidence: The State of the Law in the Netherlands and the United States; P.T.C. van Kampen. 13. Expert Witnesses in Europe and America; M.J. Saks. 14. The Role of the Forensic Expert in an Inquisitorial System; T. Broeders. 15. Psychological Expert Witnesses in Germany and the Netherlands; C. Knörnschild, P.J. van Koppen. 16. Preventing Bad Psychological Scientific Evidence in the Netherlands and the United States; P.J. vanKoppen, M.J. Saks. 17. Styles of Trial Procedure at the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia; F.J. Pakes. 18. Convergence and Complementarity between Professional Judges and lay Adjudicators; S. Seidman Diamond. 19. The Principle of Open Justice in the Netherlands; R. Hoekstra, M. Malsch. 20. The John Wayne and Judge Dee Versions of Justice; P.J. van Koppen, S.D. Penrod. Legal Citations. References. Index.