After Columbus: Essays in the Ethnohistory of Colonial North America by James AxtellAfter Columbus: Essays in the Ethnohistory of Colonial North America by James Axtell

After Columbus: Essays in the Ethnohistory of Colonial North America

byJames Axtell

Paperback | March 22, 1990

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This volume comprises a new collection of essays--four previously unpublished--by James Axtell, author of the acclaimed The European and the Indian and The Invasion Within: The Contest of Cultures in Colonial North America, and the foremost contemporary authority on Indian-European relationsin Colonial North America. Arguing that moral judgements have a legitimate place in the writing of history, Axtell scrutinizes the actions of various European invaders--missionaries, traders, soldiers, and ordinary settlers--in the sixteenth century. Focusing on the interactions of Spanish,French, and English colonists with American Indians over the eastern half of the United States, he examines what the history of colonial America might have looked like had the New World truly been a "virgin land," devoid of Indians.
James Axtell is at College of William and Mary.
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Title:After Columbus: Essays in the Ethnohistory of Colonial North AmericaFormat:PaperbackDimensions:320 pages, 8.27 × 5.51 × 0.87 inPublished:March 22, 1990Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0195053761

ISBN - 13:9780195053760

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Editorial Reviews

"Focusing on a broad spectrum of ethnohistorical subjects, these 12 essays offer Axtell's insights into problems such as morality in the interpretation and writing of ethnohistory, the validity and success of the Christian mission effort among the tribes, early Indian impressions of Europeans,and the scholar's obligation to Indian people....Axtell amply demonstrates that traditional historians have consistently underestimated the impact of Native peoples on the course of early American history."--Choice