Against Equality of Opportunity

Hardcover | May 10, 2004

byMatt Cavanagh

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These days almost everyone seems to think it obvious that equality of opportunity is at least part of what constitutes a fair society. At the same time they are so vague about what equality of opportunity actually amounts to that it can begin to look like an empty term, a convenient shorthandfor the way jobs (or for that matter university places, or positions of power, or merely places on the local sports team) should be allocated, whatever that happens to be.Matt Cavanagh offers a highly provocative and original new view, suggesting that the way we think about equality and opportunity should be radically changed.

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These days almost everyone seems to think it obvious that equality of opportunity is at least part of what constitutes a fair society. At the same time they are so vague about what equality of opportunity actually amounts to that it can begin to look like an empty term, a convenient shorthandfor the way jobs (or for that matter univers...

Matt Cavanagh was formerly a Lecturer, St Catherine's College, Oxford.

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Format:HardcoverDimensions:232 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 0.44 inPublished:May 10, 2004Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199265488

ISBN - 13:9780199265480

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Table of Contents

1. Introduction2. Meritocracy3. Equality4. Discrimination5. ConclusionsReferences, Index

Editorial Reviews

`a well-argued, insightful, highly nuanced book, well worth close study by anyone who is concerned to make sense of the concept of equal opportunity. It is a model of close, rigorous, analytic thinking about moral matters. It challenges received orthodoxies at several points, and forces all ofus to reevaluate our commitment to meritocracy and equality.'Louis Pojman, Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews