Against the Self-Images Of the Age: Essays on Ideology and Philosophy by Alasdair MacIntyreAgainst the Self-Images Of the Age: Essays on Ideology and Philosophy by Alasdair MacIntyre

Against the Self-Images Of the Age: Essays on Ideology and Philosophy

byAlasdair MacIntyre

Paperback | September 30, 1989

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Alasdair MacIntyre is one of the few professional philosophers whose writings span both technical analytical philosophy and those general moral or intellectual questions that laymen often suppose to be the province of philosophy but that are seldom discussed within its bounds. The unity of this book—made up both of original and previously published pieces—lies in its attempt to expose this dichotomy and to link beliefs and moral theories with philosophical criticism. The author successively criticizes Christianity, Marxism, and psychoanalysis for their failure to express the forms of thought and action that constitute our contemporary social life, and argues that a greater understanding of our complex world will require a more thorough inquiry into the philosophy of the social sciences.

 
Alasdair MacIntyre is research professor of philosophy at the University of Notre Dame. He is the author of numerous books, including AfterVirtue: A Study in Moral Theory, Third Edition (2007), Whose Justice? Which Rationality? (1988), and Three Rival Versions of Moral Enquiry: Encyclopaedia, Genealogy, and Tradition (1990), all publis...
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Title:Against the Self-Images Of the Age: Essays on Ideology and PhilosophyFormat:PaperbackDimensions:296 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.9 inPublished:September 30, 1989Publisher:University of Notre Dame Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0268005877

ISBN - 13:9780268005870

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“. . . the arguments which MacIntyre advances on these topics are at once subtly conceived and persuasively expressed.” —The Observer Review