Air Conditioned Nightmare by Henry MillerAir Conditioned Nightmare by Henry Miller

Air Conditioned Nightmare

byHenry Miller

Paperback | January 6, 1981

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In 1939, after ten years as an expatriate, Henry Miller returned to the United States with a keen desire to see what his native land was really like—to get to the roots of the American nature and experience. He set out on a journey that was to last three years, visiting many sections of the country and making friends of all descriptions. The Air-Conditioned Nightmare is the result of that odyssey.
Henry Miller (1891—1980) was one of the most controversial American novelists during his lifetime. His book, The Tropic of Cancer, was banned in the some U.S. states before being overruled by the Supreme Court. New Directions publishes several of his books.
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Title:Air Conditioned NightmareFormat:PaperbackPublished:January 6, 1981Publisher:WW Norton

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0811201066

ISBN - 13:9780811201063

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Reviews

From Our Editors

Like David Foster Wallace or Spalding Gray more recently, Henry Miller turned his literary energy on his own country, America, and variably lamented it, spat on it and praised. In The Air-Conditioned Nightmare, the author of controversial fiction like Tropic of Cancer engages in some painful sooth-saying about his homeland: he doesn't like what he sees in the country, particularly in the money-hungry values of its people. This book arises from travels Miller took around the United States in 1940 and '41, after he returned from a long residency in Europe. Sitting America down and telling it why it sometimes sucks is a necessary literary activity for such a dominant cultural power, and though Gray and Wallace do it with a little more gentility, humour or irony, they are still carrying on the spirit of a guy like Henry Miller.

Editorial Reviews

Henry Miller is the nearest thing to Céline America has produced .... He aims not at the ears, brains or consciences, but at the viscera and solar plexus. — New Leader