All Art is Propaganda: Critical Essays by George OrwellAll Art is Propaganda: Critical Essays by George Orwell

All Art is Propaganda: Critical Essays

byGeorge Orwell

Paperback | October 15, 2008

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As a critic, George Orwell cast a wide net. Equally at home discussing Charles Dickens and Charlie Chaplin, he moved back and forth across the porous borders between essay and journalism, high art and low. A frequent commentator on literature, language, film, and drama throughout his career, Orwell turned increasingly to the critical essay in the 1940s, when his most important experiences were behind him and some of his most incisive writing lay ahead.

"All Art Is Propaganda "follows Orwell as he demonstrates in piece after piece how intent analysis of a work or body of work gives rise to trenchant aesthetic and philosophical commentary. With masterpieces such as "Politics and the English Language" and "Rudyard Kipling" and gems such as "Good Bad Books," here is an unrivaled education in, as George Packer puts it, "how to be interesting, line after line."

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Title:All Art is Propaganda: Critical EssaysFormat:PaperbackDimensions:320 pages, 7.86 × 5.36 × 0.99 inPublished:October 15, 2008Publisher:Harcourt Trade PublishersLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0156033070

ISBN - 13:9780156033077

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Customer Reviews of All Art is Propaganda: Critical Essays

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Rated 4 out of 5 by from Orwell the Pamphleteer This is a collection of essays edited by two academics with a short preface and introduction from each. There isn't a common thesis among the essays, but they loosely correspond to the notion that all art (really they mean literature) is propagandistic. Surely some of the essays stretch that notion a little too far. In fact, one could argue that several of the essays don't even related to the title of the book. Nevertheless, Orwell is still great to read, a unique and wonderful wit to his writing. An example would be: "Political writing in our time consists almost entiresly of prefabricated phrases bolted together like the pieces of a child's Meccano set" (p. 262). Orwell is strongest when he writes about totalitarianism, and class-consciousness. But the first chapters on Dickens are also very thought-provoking. His famous "Politics of the English Language" is also included. Though the editors claim that essayists like Orwell are a rare breed, one could argue that such political satire has simply transitioned into a different medium. Overall, this is a great book from one of the twentieth-century's most influential writers. While most of the material is probably accessible by other means, they are conveniently packaged in one neat book here.
Date published: 2009-04-05