Alterities: Criticism, History, Representation

Paperback | April 30, 1999

byThomas Docherty

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Alterities marks an advance to a new stage of critical theory. Dealing with literature from Shakespeare and Donne to Calvino, with philosophy from the medieval to the contemporary, with cinema from popular to art-film, and with political theory from Marx to Lyotard, Baudrillard and Badiou,Thomas Docherty intervenes in all the major contemporary cultural debates to propose and practise a new criticism, whose theoretical foundations lie in a postmodern ethics, ecopolitics, and an austere attention to the radical difficulties of art. Docherty's new book is a response to a growing realization that modern criticsm - even in its apparently oppositional forms - remains caught up within the limitations of a philosophy of identity. Consequently, the tacit purpose of existing critique is the self-legitimation of the subject ofcriticism, a solace gained only through the refusal of the encounter with the objects of criticism: art and the culture of sociality. Alterities argues that we must attend to the difficulty of aesthetic practices. The contention is that it is only through an attention to the radical otherness ofthe world outside consciousness that we will be able to arrive at a historical and materialist criticism. In making this claim, Docherty rehabilitates the questions of why we bother about art, and proposes new modes of critical engagement with contemporary culture. Bound together by the cohesive drive of Docherty's intelligence and the coerciveness of the arguments he enlarges about alterity and historicity, Alterities is essential reading for those interested in postmodernist theory.

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From Our Editors

Alterities marks an advance to a new stage in critical theory. Dealing with literature from Shakespeare and Donne to Calvino; with philosophy from the medieval to the contemporary; with cinema from popular to art-film; and with political theory from Marx to Lyotard, Baudrillard, and Badiou. Thomas Docherty intervenes in all the major c...

From the Publisher

Alterities marks an advance to a new stage of critical theory. Dealing with literature from Shakespeare and Donne to Calvino, with philosophy from the medieval to the contemporary, with cinema from popular to art-film, and with political theory from Marx to Lyotard, Baudrillard and Badiou,Thomas Docherty intervenes in all the major co...

Thomas Docherty, Professor of English Literature, University of Kent at Canterbury.

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:234 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 0.07 inPublished:April 30, 1999Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198183585

ISBN - 13:9780198183587

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From Our Editors

Alterities marks an advance to a new stage in critical theory. Dealing with literature from Shakespeare and Donne to Calvino; with philosophy from the medieval to the contemporary; with cinema from popular to art-film; and with political theory from Marx to Lyotard, Baudrillard, and Badiou. Thomas Docherty intervenes in all the major contemporary cultural debates to propose and practise a new criticism, whose theoretical foundations lie in a postmodern ethics, ecopolitics, and an austere attention to the radical difficulties of art.

Editorial Reviews

`Marking an advance in critical theory, Thomas Docherty's new book, pays heed to the oppositional forms through a serious critical focus on the otherness of the world outside consciousness.'The Tribune (India)