America and the Law of Nations 1776-1939

Hardcover | April 20, 2010

byMark Weston Janis

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The American Tradition of International Law 1776-1939 is a unique exploration of the ways in which Americans have perceived, applied, advanced, and frustrated international law. It demonstrates the varieties and continuities of America's approaches to international law. The book begins withthe important role the law of nations played for founders like Jefferson and Madison in framing the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. It then discusses the intellectual contributions to international law made by leaders in the New Republic -Kent and Wheaton- and the place ofinternational law in the 19th century judgments of Marshall, Story, and Taney. The book goes on to examine the contributions of American utopians -Dodge, Worcester, Ladd, Burritt, and Carnegie- to the establishment of the League of Nations, the World Court, the International Law Association and theAmerican Society of International Law. It finishes with an analysis of the wavering support to international law given by Woodrow Wilson and the emergence of a new American isolationism following the disappointment of World War I. For anyone who hopes to understand the important place of international law in America and the complex role of America in the development of international law, The American Tradition of International Law 1776-1939 is a crucial read.

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The American Tradition of International Law 1776-1939 is a unique exploration of the ways in which Americans have perceived, applied, advanced, and frustrated international law. It demonstrates the varieties and continuities of America's approaches to international law. The book begins withthe important role the law of nations played f...

Mark Weston Janis is William F. Starr Professor of Law at the University of Connecticut School of Law. Born in Chicago in 1947, he is a graduate of Princeton (A.B. 1969), Oxford (B.A. 1972) where he was a Rhodes scholar, and Harvard (J.D. 1977). He served as a U.S. naval officer (1972-75), and practiced international corporate and f...
Format:HardcoverDimensions:272 pagesPublished:April 20, 2010Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199579342

ISBN - 13:9780199579341

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Table of Contents

1. The Law of Nations and the New Republic: Jefferson and Madison2. The Law of Nations and International Law: Blackstone and Bentham3. International Law and American Law: Marshall and Story4. The International Law of Christendom: Kent and Wheaton5. International Law and American Diplomacy: Jay and Webster6. The Utopians: Dodge, Worcester, Ladd and Burritt7. Slavery and American Exceptionalism: Taney and his Court8. The Codification and Science of International Law: Lieber, Field and Wharton9. The Alabama Arbitration and its Progeny: The International Law Association and the American Society of International Law10. The New Utopians: Brace, Hill and Carnegie11. The Reluctant International Law Enthusiast: Wilson12. The Profession of International Law: Root and Scott13. After Utopia: International Law and Isolationism