American Epic: Reading the U.S. Constitution

Paperback | February 15, 2015

byGarrett Epps

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In 1987, E.L. Doctorow celebrated the Constitution's bicentennial by reading it. "It is five thousand words long but reads like fifty thousand," he said. Distinguished legal scholar Garrett Epps - himself an award-winning novelist - disagrees. It's about 7,500 words. And Doctorow "missed agood deal of high rhetoric, many literary tropes, and even a trace of, if not wit, at least irony," he writes. Americans may venerate the Constitution, "but all too seldom is it read."In American Epic, Epps takes us through a complete reading of the Constitution - even the "boring" parts - to achieve an appreciation of its power and a holistic understanding of what it says. In this book he seeks not to provide a definitive interpretation, but to listen to the language and ponderits meaning. He draws on four modes of reading: scriptural, legal, lyric, and epic. The Constitution's first three words, for example, sound spiritual - but Epps finds them to be more aspirational than prayer-like. "Prayers are addressed to someone . . . either an earthly king or a divine lord, andgreat care is taken to name the addressee. . . . This does the reverse. The speaker is 'the people,' the words addressed to the world at large." He turns the Second Amendment into a poem to illuminate its ambiguity. He notices oddities and omissions. The Constitution lays out rules for presidentialappointment of officers, for example, but not removal. Should the Senate approve each firing? Can it withdraw its "advice and consent" and force a resignation? And he challenges himself, as seen in his surprising discussion of the Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA) in light of Article 4, which ordersstates to give "full faith and credit" to the acts of other states. Wry, original, and surprising, American Epic is a scholarly and literary tour de force.

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In 1987, E.L. Doctorow celebrated the Constitution's bicentennial by reading it. "It is five thousand words long but reads like fifty thousand," he said. Distinguished legal scholar Garrett Epps - himself an award-winning novelist - disagrees. It's about 7,500 words. And Doctorow "missed agood deal of high rhetoric, many literary trope...

Garrett Epps is Professor of Law at the University of Baltimore Law School. A former staff writer for the Washington Post, he has written for the New York Times, New Republic, The New York Review of Books, and the Atlantic. Two of his nonfiction books, Democracy Reborn and To An Unknown God, have been finalists for the American Bar As...

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:304 pages, 9.21 × 6.1 × 1.18 inPublished:February 15, 2015Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199389713

ISBN - 13:9780199389711

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Table of Contents

PrefacePreamble: "Tell me, Muse, how it all began"Article I: A Tale of Two CitiesArticle II: Under the Bramble BushArticle III: Solomon's SwordArticle IV: All God's ChidrenArticle V: Alter or AbolishArticle VI: The Supreme Law of the LandArticle VII: Bloodless and SuccessfulLast Things

Editorial Reviews

"Drawing on his skills as novelist, poet, law professor, and journalist, Garrett Epps leads us on a fabulous journey through the text of the American Constitution, at once both entertaining and deeply serious. You could not ask for a better tour guide." --Jack M. Balkin, Knight Professor of Constitutional Law and the First Amendment, Yale Law School, author of Living Originalism