American Imperial Pastoral: The Architecture Of Us Colonialism In The Philippines

Hardcover | January 20, 2017

byRebecca Tinio Mckenna

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In 1904, renowned architect Daniel Burnham, the Progressive Era urban planner who famously “Made No Little Plans,” set off for the Philippines, the new US colonial acquisition. Charged with designing environments for the occupation government, Burnham set out to convey the ambitions and the dominance of the regime, drawing on neo-classical formalism for the Pacific colony. The spaces he created, most notably in the summer capital of Baguio, gave physical form to American rule and its contradictions.

In American Imperial Pastoral, Rebecca Tinio McKenna examines the design, construction, and use of Baguio, making visible the physical shape, labor, and sustaining practices of the US’s new empire—especially the dispossessions that underwrote market expansion. In the process, she demonstrates how colonialists conducted market-making through state-building and vice-versa. Where much has been made of the racial dynamics of US colonialism in the region, McKenna emphasizes capitalist practices and design ideals—giving us a fresh and nuanced understanding of the American occupation of the Philippines.

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In 1904, renowned architect Daniel Burnham, the Progressive Era urban planner who famously “Made No Little Plans,” set off for the Philippines, the new US colonial acquisition. Charged with designing environments for the occupation government, Burnham set out to convey the ambitions and the dominance of the regime, drawing on neo-class...

Rebecca Tinio McKenna is assistant professor of history at the University of Notre Dame.
Format:HardcoverDimensions:272 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.98 inPublished:January 20, 2017Publisher:University Of Chicago PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:022641776X

ISBN - 13:9780226417769

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction
1 A Cure for Philippinitis
2 Liberating Labor: The Road to Baguio
3 “A Hope of Something Unusual among Cities”
4 “Independencia in a Box”
5 Savage Hospitality
Epilogue
Notes
Bibliography
Index

Editorial Reviews

“As a ‘complex pastoral’ built on the shifting grounds of native settlements, imperial conquest, and elite collaboration, the city of Baguio in the Northern Philippines emerged through a process of primitive accumulation. McKenna brilliantly plots the Spanish antecedents of the American colonial hill station and carefully details the planners’ vision of a racial haven for white rulers based on the economic theft and symbolic appropriation of native land and culture. She examines a range of sites—the zig-zag road, the native dog market, the American country club—alongside debates between colonial officials and Filipino nationalists—to illuminate the contradictions and ambiguities of this colonial pastoral. Lucidly written and theoretically astute, American Imperial Pastoral is an indispensable intervention into the history of the colonial Philippines and in the comparative history of empires.”