American Missionaries, Christian Oyatoi, and Japan, 1859-73 by Hamish IonAmerican Missionaries, Christian Oyatoi, and Japan, 1859-73 by Hamish Ion

American Missionaries, Christian Oyatoi, and Japan, 1859-73

byHamish Ion

Paperback | July 1, 2010

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Japan closed its doors to foreigners for over two hundred yearsbecause of religious and political instability caused by Christianity.By 1859, foreign residents were once again living in treaty ports inJapan, but edicts banning Christianity remained enforced until1873.

Ion investigates the impact of American Protestant missionaries andChristian laymen, or oyatoi, from their arrival in 1859 to1873, when Christianity was propagated openly. Drawing on an impressivearray of English and Japanese sources, he grounds the hopes andaspirations of these early missionaries – along with theirefforts in private, mission, and government schools – in therealities of Japanese opposition to Christianity. The transmission ofvalues and beliefs in this context was not a simple matter ofacceptance or rejection: missionaries saw promise even in the face ofopen hostility. As informal agents of the United States and as integralmembers of the American community in Japan, they also served asimportant cultural mediators between the East and the West. 

American Missionaries, Christian Oyatoi, and Japan,185973 brings to light a crucial but neglectedaspect of the Japanese-American relationship. It will appeal tostudents and scholars of modern Japan, international relations, andChristian missions.

Hamish Ion is a professor of history at the Royal Military College of Canada.
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Title:American Missionaries, Christian Oyatoi, and Japan, 1859-73Format:PaperbackDimensions:440 pages, 9 × 6 × 1.06 inPublished:July 1, 2010Publisher:Ubc PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0774816481

ISBN - 13:9780774816489

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Table of Contents

Introduction

1 Beginnings in Bakumatsu Japan
2 Hoping for Change
3 In the Midst of a Restoration
4 Persecution
5 Overseas Students
6 Teaching in the Provinces and in Tokyo
7 Reinforcements and New Beginnings
8 The Yokohama Band

Conclusion

Appendices
Notes
Bibliography
Index

Editorial Reviews

Japan closed its doors to foreigners for over two hundred years becauseof religious and political instability caused by Christianity. By 1859,foreign residents were once again living in treaty ports in Japan, butedicts banning Christianity remained enforced until 1873. Drawing on animpressive array of English and Japanese sources, Ion investigates acrucial era in the history of Japanese-American relations – theformation of Protestant missions. He reveals that the transmission ofvalues and beliefs was not a simple matter of acceptance or rejection:missionaries and Christian laymen persisted in the face of openhostility and served as important liaisons between East and West.