American Police 1945-2012 by Thomas A. ReppettoAmerican Police 1945-2012 by Thomas A. Reppetto

American Police 1945-2012

byThomas A. Reppetto

Paperback | September 30, 2014

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A great addition to true crime collections. Recommended."-Library JournalIn more than ten years after World War II America saw few changes to law enforcement as it had been practiced for over a century. The San Francisco riot of August 1945 announced the more violent events of the next half century. Policing methods remained unchanged until the 1953 kidnapping of Bobby Greenlease in Missouri, which shook the country and revealed severe deficiencies existing in local and federal agencies.Civil Rights and major riots tore open the 1960s. Watts, Detroit, and Newark were tragic proof of how local police departments couldn't handle the disorders engulfing those cities.The anti-war protest at the 1968 Chicago Democratic Convention plays an important part, since the author was in charge of convention security. The police department was split about its strategy on how to deal with the protestors: a major revelation of this book. The author also had a memorable encounter with Nixon's infamous Attorney General John Mitchell.The decades of the 1970s and 80s provide the lowest points in modern American law enforcement, combined with times of economic uncertainty and political crisis. Only with the emergence of "zero tolerance" initiated by NY Police Commissioner William Bratton and Mayor Rudy Giuliani did the law enforcement picture show a marked improvement. That example was followed by the entire country with mixed results. 9/11 brutally changed the landscape with the new focus on counterterror that dominated big city police departments and the appearance of Homeland Security. "A great addition to true crime collections. Recommended."-Library JournalIn more than ten years after World War II America saw few changes to law enforcement as it had been practiced for over a century. The San Francisco riot of August 1945 announced the more violent events of the next half century. Policing methods remained unchanged until the 1953 kidnapping of Bobby Greenlease in Missouri, which shook the country and revealed severe deficiencies existing in local and federal agencies.Civil Rights and major riots tore open the 1960s. Watts, Detroit, and Newark were tragic proof of how local police departments couldn't handle the disorders engulfing those cities.The anti-war protest at the 1968 Chicago Democratic Convention plays an important part, since the author was in charge of convention security. The police department was split about its strategy on how to deal with the protestors: a major revelation of this book. The author also had a memorable encounter with Nixon's infamous Attorney General John Mitchell.The decades of the 1970s and 80s provide the lowest points in modern American law enforcement, combined with times of economic uncertainty and political crisis. Only with the emergence of "zero tolerance" initiated by NY Police Commissioner William Bratton and Mayor Rudy Giuliani did the law enforcement picture show a marked improvement. That example was followed by the entire country with mixed results. 9/11 brutally changed the landscape with the new focus on counterterror that dominated big city police departments and the appearance of Homeland Security. "
Thomas Reppetto is a former commander of detectives in the Chicago police department, where he began his career as a beat cop. PhD in Public Administration from Harvard University. Dean of Graduate Studies at John Jay College, CUNY. Successful author of many books about crime and police history.
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Title:American Police 1945-2012Format:PaperbackDimensions:268 pages, 9 × 6 × 0.68 inPublished:September 30, 2014Publisher:Enigma BooksLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1936274671

ISBN - 13:9781936274673

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