American Slaves in Victorian England: Abolitionist Politics in Popular Literature and Culture by Audrey A. FischAmerican Slaves in Victorian England: Abolitionist Politics in Popular Literature and Culture by Audrey A. Fisch

American Slaves in Victorian England: Abolitionist Politics in Popular Literature and Culture

byAudrey A. Fisch

Hardcover | February 13, 2000

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Audrey Fisch's study examines the circulation within England of the people and ideas of the black Abolitionist campaign. By focusing on Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin, an anonymous sequel to that novel, Uncle Tom in England, and John Brown's Slave Life in Georgia, and the lecture tours of free blacks and ex-slaves, Fisch follows the discourse of American abolitionism as it moved across the Atlantic and was reshaped by domestic Victorian debates about popular culture and taste, the worker versus the slave, popular education, and working class self-improvement.
Title:American Slaves in Victorian England: Abolitionist Politics in Popular Literature and CultureFormat:HardcoverDimensions:150 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.51 inPublished:February 13, 2000Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521660262

ISBN - 13:9780521660266

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Table of Contents

Introduction: communicating 'a correct knowledge of American slavery': J. B. Estlin and the 'breeder' in Frederick Douglass's Narrative; 1. 'Exhibiting Uncle Tom in some shape or other': the commercialisation and reception of Uncle Tom's Cabin in England; 2. Abolition as a 'step to reform in our kingdom': Chartism, 'white slaves', and a new 'Uncle Tom' in England; 3. 'Repetitious accounts so piteous and so harrowing': the ideological work of American slave narratives in England; 4. 'Negrophilism' and nationalism: the spectacle of the African-American abolitionist; Epilogue: 'How cautious and calculating?': English audiences and the impostor Reuben Nixon.

From Our Editors

The presence of the black abolitionist in Victorian England is the subject of this scholarly study by Audrey Fisch. American Slaves in Victorian England Abolitionist Politics in Popular Literature and Culture focusses on three texts: Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin, its anonymous sequel Uncle Tom in England and John Brown's Slave Life in Georgia. Fisch traces the evolution of abolition as it travelled across the Atlantic and describes how lecture tours conducted by free blacks and ex-slaves reshaped opinions of the Victorian working class.

Editorial Reviews

"she has provided a fascinating insight into the British response to a brief, intense cultural phenomenon worked in the context of mid-nineteenthy-century England and America." Victorian Periodicals Reveiw