America's Musical Pulse: Popular Music in Twentieth-Century Society

Hardcover | September 1, 1992

EditorKenneth J. Bindas

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Popular music may be viewed as primary documents of society, and America's Musical Pulse documents the American experience as recorded in popular sound. Whether jazz, blues, swing, country, or rock, the music, the impulse behind it, and the reaction to it reveal the attitudes of an era or generation. Always a major preoccupation of students, music is often ignored by teaching professionals, who might profitably channel this interest to further understandings of American social history and such diverse fields as sociology, political science, literature, communications, and business as well as music. In this interdisciplinary collection, scholars, educators, and writers from a variety of fields and perspectives relate topics concerning twentieth-century popular music to issues of politics, class, economics, race, gender, and the social context. The focus throughout is to place music in societal perspective and encourage investigation of the complex issues behind the popular tunes, rhythms, and lyrics.

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Popular music may be viewed as primary documents of society, and America's Musical Pulse documents the American experience as recorded in popular sound. Whether jazz, blues, swing, country, or rock, the music, the impulse behind it, and the reaction to it reveal the attitudes of an era or generation. Always a major preoccupation of stu...

Format:HardcoverDimensions:328 pages, 9.54 × 6.36 × 1.14 inPublished:September 1, 1992Publisher:GREENWOOD PRESS INC.

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0313274657

ISBN - 13:9780313274657

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?The book is ambitious in its coverage of musical genres and time periods--some essays begin with turn-of-the-century issues; and styles such as ragtime and tin pan alley are examined in addition to strong sections on jazz, blues, rock and country. For such a wide scope and purpose, this book succeeds admirably. . . . I do recommend this book highly. It is very readable, will work well in the classroom and--because of its scope--can also serve as a helpful reference and review for pop music/culture scholars.?-Popular Music and Society