Amputation, Prosthesis Use, and Phantom Limb Pain: An Interdisciplinary Perspective by Craig MurrayAmputation, Prosthesis Use, and Phantom Limb Pain: An Interdisciplinary Perspective by Craig Murray

Amputation, Prosthesis Use, and Phantom Limb Pain: An Interdisciplinary Perspective

byCraig Murray

Hardcover | December 14, 2009

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The main objective in the rehabilitation of people following amputation is to restore or improve their functioning, which includes their return to work. Full-time employment leads to beneficial health effects and being healthy leads to increased chances of full-time employment (Ross and Mirowskay 1995). Employment of disabled people enhances their self-esteem and reduces social isolation (Dougherty 1999). The importance of returning to work for people following amputation the- fore has to be considered. Perhaps the first article about reemployment and problems people may have at work after amputation was published in 1955 (Boynton 1955). In later years, there have been sporadic studies on this topic. Greater interest and more studies about returning to work and problems people have at work following amputation arose in the 1990s and has continued in recent years (Burger and Marinc ?ek 2007). These studies were conducted in different countries on all the five continents, the greatest number being carried out in Europe, mainly in the Netherlands and the UK (Burger and Marinc ?ek 2007). Owing to the different functions of our lower and upper limbs, people with lower limb amputations have different activity limitations and participation restrictions compared to people with upper limb amputations. Both have problems with driving and carrying objects. People with lower limb amputations also have problems standing, walking, running, kicking, turning and stamping, whereas people with upper limb amputations have problems grasping, lifting, pushing, pulling, writing, typing, and pounding (Giridhar et al. 2001).
Craig Murray is a Senior Lecturer at Lancaster University with research specialization in health, clinical psychology, and embodiment. He has more than 100 journal, book, and conference publications. These include papers in key Health Psychology (British Journal of Health Psychology; Health Informatics; Health Psychology; Health, Risk ...
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Title:Amputation, Prosthesis Use, and Phantom Limb Pain: An Interdisciplinary PerspectiveFormat:HardcoverDimensions:203 pagesPublished:December 14, 2009Publisher:Springer NatureLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0387874615

ISBN - 13:9780387874616

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Table of Contents

Developing an Interdisciplinary Perspective on Amputation, Prosthesis Use, and Phantom Limb Pain: An Introduction.- Need-Directed Design of Prostheses and Enabling Resources.- Ethical and Medico-Legal Issues in Amputee Prosthetic Rehabilitation.- Monitoring of Upper Limb Prosthesis Activity in Trans-Radial Amputees.- Adaptation to Amputation and Prosthesis Use.- Understanding Adjustment and Coping to Limb Loss and Absence through Phenomenologies of Prosthesis Use.- Return to Work After Amputation.- Gender, Sexuality and Prosthesis Use: Implications for Rehabilitation.- Post Amputation Chronic Pain Profile and Management.- Phantom Limb Pain; Prevalence, Mechanisms and Associated Factors.- Management of Phantom Limb Pain.- Virtual Solutions to Phantom Problems: Using Immersive Virtual Reality to Treat Phantom Limb Pain.

Editorial Reviews

From the reviews:"The book consists of 12 chapters divided into 3 main sections that outline the multidisciplinary developments in the understanding and treatment of phantom limb pain. Each chapter is well written and provides references to key sources in the field. . This book is written for a variety of professionals and draws attention to the increased need for additional research in the area of phantom limb pain. The book has accomplished its goal of updating current understanding and identifying optimal, multidisciplinary treatments of phantom limb pain." (Brian M. Kelly, Journal of the American Medical Association, December, 2010)