Amulet by Roberto BolanoAmulet by Roberto Bolano

Amulet

byRoberto BolanoTranslated byChris Andrews

Paperback | April 29, 2008

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Amulet is a monologue, like Bolano's acclaimed debut in English, By Night in Chile. The speaker is Auxilio Lacouture, a Uruguayan woman who moved to Mexico in the 1960s, becoming the "Mother of Mexican Poetry," hanging out with the young poets in the cafés and bars of the University. She's tall, thin, and blonde, and her favorite young poet in the 1970s is none other than Arturo Belano (Bolano's fictional stand-in throughout his books).

As well as her young poets, Auxilio recalls three remarkable women: the melancholic young philosopher Elena, the exiled Catalan painter Remedios Varo, and Lilian Serpas, a poet who once slept with Che Guevara. And in the course of her imaginary visit to the house of Remedios Varo, Auxilio sees an uncanny landscape, a kind of chasm. This chasm reappears in a vision at the end of the book: an army of children is marching toward it, singing as they go. The children are the idealistic young Latin Americans who came to maturity in the '70s, and the last words of the novel are: "And that song is our amulet."
The poet Chris Andrews teaches at the University of Western Sydney, Australia, where he is a member of the Writing and Society Research Centre. He has translated books by Roberto Bolaño and César Aira for New Directions.
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Title:AmuletFormat:PaperbackDimensions:192 pages, 8 × 5.2 × 0.6 inPublished:April 29, 2008Publisher:WW NortonLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0811217469

ISBN - 13:9780811217460

Reviews

Editorial Reviews

Bolaño's reputation and legend are in meteoric ascent. — Larry Rohter (The New York Times)The most influential and admired novelist of his generation in the Spanish-speaking world. — Susan Sontag (Times Literary Supplement)He is by far the most exciting writer to come from south of the Rio Grande in a long time. — Ilan Stavans (Los Angeles Times)Bolaño wrote with the high-voltage first-person braininess of a Saul Bellow and an extreme subversive vision of his own. — Francisco Goldman (The New York Times Magazine)