An Acre Of Fools by Aden JamesAn Acre Of Fools by Aden James

An Acre Of Fools

byAden James

Paperback | May 10, 2016

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about

After battling a long illness, Peter Stewart's daughter, Austin, finds herself in a nightmarish addiction that thrusts her and her family into a world they never imagined.

As she buries herself deeper and deeper into the narcotics culture of shameless selfishness and deeply personal manipulation, Peter's unwavering hope for her drives a wedge between him and the less forgiving family members.

But when Austin finally chooses to embrace all that the life of addiction offers, Peter is forced to choose between his faith and a family too broken to hope.

He chooses poorly.
Aden James lives in the Low Country of South Carolina where he enjoys the outdoors with his wife, daughters and grandsons. He serves on the Board of three non-profit organizations and supports several charitable organizations dedicated to serving childhood illness, addiction and human trafficking.
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Title:An Acre Of FoolsFormat:PaperbackDimensions:336 pages, 8.5 × 5.5 × 0.87 inPublished:May 10, 2016Publisher:Elevate PublishingLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:1943425361

ISBN - 13:9781943425365

Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from One of my favourites! This book was recommended by my psychology professor and I absolutely fell in love with it! It speaks volumes on the family dynamic. I related to one of the characters really well, which made me think a lot about my own family situation. Worth the read!
Date published: 2017-11-30
Rated 4 out of 5 by from A Family Torn Apart This book really made me appreciate the importance of family. Set against the backdrop of a child's death, we see how one family processes their grief and emotions in different way and how they manage to stay together through the impossible.
Date published: 2017-11-29
Rated 5 out of 5 by from One of the best novels Celeste Ng is such a creative author that the story covers with American history, different cultural influences, races, family issues, education...etc. The story is so emotional and complicated with deep meaning. This is definitely not a typical novel that done by an Asian author.
Date published: 2017-10-10
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Interesting enough to want to keep reading The narrative structure is a little difficult to follow as the author switches character perspectives frequently, sometimes within the same paragraph, but it was still interesting enough to want to continue to read.
Date published: 2017-10-04
Rated 2 out of 5 by from It was alright I couldn't connect with the characters, and didn't feel any emotional aspect to it. Found it to be very slow at times.
Date published: 2017-09-25
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Read it for school Exceptional & very, very sad. Captures everything about broken families, everything we're familiar with. Read this for a university course on Asian North American Lit. and absolutely loved it.
Date published: 2017-09-04
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Awesomest Family Drama to read on Great and intense family drama, especially the racial tension, also the character Lydia reminded me of Memoirs of a Geisha protagonist Chiyo/Sayuri, with blue eyes <3 <3 <3 <3
Date published: 2017-08-22
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Reccomend! Excellent family drama, well put-together and heartbreaking in the isolation of each family member.
Date published: 2017-08-20
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Loved this novel Beautifully written debut novel. An honest tale about family and secrets. I look forward to reading more by this author.
Date published: 2017-08-17
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Great read I enjoyed this much more than I thought I would which is always a pleasant surprise. It was beautifully written.
Date published: 2017-07-21
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Better than expected. I enjoyed this one more than I initially anticipated. If you're looking for a murder-mystery, keep looking. If you're looking for a story with deep character development, this is for you. The members of the Lee family are all tragic in that they are all, in many ways, victims of circumstances beyond their control. Marilyn is a white, blond homemaker born in the wrong decade who has always dreamed of being a doctor. James is small-town professor born to Chinese immigrants who has always dreamed of being like everyone else. They both try to live vicariously through their daughter, Lydia, who is crushed by the heavy weight of their expectations. As a result, their eldest child, a son named Nath who earned early acceptance to Harvard and who dreams of going to space, is never good enough, is never loved enough. Similarly, their youngest child, Hannah, is the forgotten child who learns to make herself small, hide in nooks and crannies, and often feels like she might as well be invisible. The tragic irony is that it is only through their inept coping mechanisms that they engage in as a result of Lydia's death that the family is able to find each other again. And find forgiveness.
Date published: 2017-07-21
Rated 5 out of 5 by from So Good! I'm not much to read books outside of business but my book club chose it and I loved it! I couldn't put it down, the mystery story was captivating.
Date published: 2017-07-12
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Made Me Cry!! Somewhat heavy ideas (to be expected) written with jumps of time that keep it interesting to read, and effectively tell the story. Ng did a great job of capturing the characters' points of view – It was so well written, so it was hard to put this book down.
Date published: 2017-06-08
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Wonderful Very intriguing and moving. A must read.
Date published: 2017-05-24
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Good Gripping Story A well told family story.
Date published: 2017-04-18
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Fantastic Great book that I could hardly put down. It is an amalgamation of several internal struggles told through incredible writing. Even with the flips back and forth between characters and time periods, I was never confused and only starved for more.
Date published: 2017-04-14
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Wow What a great book. So deep and rich. The characters are SO well written; it was refreshing. It was a little sad for me to get through this book (as a result, I'm only half way done) but I know it'll be worth it to finish.
Date published: 2017-04-05
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Loved it Right on. A good story with interesting and complex relationships between characters
Date published: 2017-03-27
Rated 5 out of 5 by from loved it! amazing, amazing, amazing! I loved this book!
Date published: 2017-03-25
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Worth the read Very interesting perspective on family life and its complications. Great book.
Date published: 2017-03-23
Rated 4 out of 5 by from loved it interesting and a great read
Date published: 2017-03-21
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Slow but interesting The premise held a lot of promise for me, but I found it slow and somewhat hard to get into. I pushed through and was glad I finished it.
Date published: 2017-03-20
Rated 4 out of 5 by from I enjoyed this one more than I initially anticipated. If you're looking for a murder-mystery, keep looking. If you're looking for a story with deep character development, this is for you. The members of the Lee family are all tragic in that they are all, in many ways, victims of circumstances beyond their control. Marilyn is a white, blond homemaker born in the wrong decade who has always dreamed of being a doctor. James is small-town professor born to Chinese immigrants who has always dreamed of being like everyone else. They both try to live vicariously through their daughter, Lydia, who is crushed by the heavy weight of their expectations. As a result, their eldest child, a son named Nath who earned early acceptance to Harvard and who dreams of going to space, is never good enough, is never loved enough. Similarly, their youngest child, Hannah, is the forgotten child who learns to make herself small, hide in nooks and crannies, and often feels like she might as well be invisible. The tragic irony is that it is only through their inept coping mechanisms that they engage in as a result of Lydia's death that the family is able to find each other again. And find forgiveness.
Date published: 2017-03-15
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Exceeded Expectations Received this book as a gift for Christmas. I put off reading it since I wasn't sure how great it would be but I was surprised. This novel is amazing!
Date published: 2017-03-13
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Pleasantly surprised Really enjoyed this book! It took some time getting into, but once I got started, I couldn't keep it down.
Date published: 2017-03-10
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Good Read I wanted to love this book more. I think how one review described it as a "quiet read" is the perfect description. The found the plot slow in spots but I kept reading cause I wanted to know how everyone turned out in the end. It is a glimpse into how tragedy can affect peoples lives in different ways.
Date published: 2017-03-04
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Surprising I thought the premise of this book sounded intriguing and was pleasantly surprised at how much I enjoyed it.
Date published: 2017-02-27
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Surprised how much I loved this The author captured the characters incredibly. This shared an opportunity to understand the upbringing of an Asian and mixed family culture and the prejudices experienced. Absolutely beautiful I was so attached to this family.
Date published: 2017-02-25
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A Great Read! This book was unlike anything I have ever read, such a smart and interesting read.
Date published: 2017-02-17
Rated 5 out of 5 by from New Favourite I absolutely loved this book. It was simultaneously heartbreaking and warming in a way? Really honest and genuine book that I think anyone would easily be able to relate to.
Date published: 2017-02-02
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Dark & Compelling Set in the 1970s in small-town Ohio, it's painful to imagine so vividly how different life was back then. This novel is well-written, dark and compelling. Everyone will be able to relate to Everything I Never Told You.
Date published: 2017-01-20
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Dark read This book is a sad story about a family. I enjoyed reading it because I hadn't read anything like this before.
Date published: 2017-01-04
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Great Book!! I was so excited to read this book, and I'm happy that I did. It had all sorts of twists and turns when I was reading, I never knew what was really going to happen. I was thinking of the storyline going one way and it totally went other directions that were surprising (not a bad thing). The ending was amazing, but the book still left me with a few questions that haven't been answered. If you're into drama and a book with twists then this is for you.
Date published: 2017-01-02
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Quiet but wonderful This is definitely what I would call a quiet novel, but wonderful nonetheless. You're kept turning pages not because it is a thriller, but because you need to know more about how the characters and their relationships will develop.
Date published: 2016-12-28
Rated 2 out of 5 by from Not what I expected The story is an original take on a very unoriginal story, but lacked substance. It was a slow read for me.
Date published: 2016-12-24
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Beautiful book This book was powerful in its observations of what a family history means in each member's daily life--how single events can ripple out over time to create waves of behavior and patterns of reactions that seem to have no beginning or end. It's a shockingly realistic take on what it means to be a family. At the core of all family life is what has been said and done, but also what has been left unsaid. The characters a beautifully cast and each one's pain and fear can be readily felt, but each one is redeemed in a way that feels honest and true. This is also a beautiful meditation on human and family psychology--the complicated layers of parents and children and expectations and failed communication.
Date published: 2016-12-19
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Page turner Couldn't book this book down! Not much of a thriller but defintely wants you leaving more.
Date published: 2016-11-30
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Loved this Such a great read! I thought it was going to be more of a thriller/crime type novel but it was much more about different family dynamics. Could not put it down!!
Date published: 2016-11-25
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Must read for all family members 4.5 "So much will happen, that I would want to tell you". Such a perfectly sad story that so realistically shows all the perspectives of different family members. Because it's a book you can want so bad for them all to speak their mind and sort things out, but you know it doesn't work that way and that really it is hard to disappoint people with your true feelings rather than to give in and please them. A must read, relatable for anyone.
Date published: 2016-11-23
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Really great read! This was a great read! I was intrigued the whole time and really felt like I could identify with the characters, as I am half Asian and half White. This book has a deeper meaning that opens up a great discussion about race, stereotypes, and love.
Date published: 2016-11-19
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Could've Been Better I was super excited to read this book, especially being mixed-racial myself. I felt as if the author could have added a better twist or something else to enhance the story line since the concept of the book is really interesting. It was still well-written, just a little disappointed it wasn't as much of a page turner as I expected it to be. #plumreview
Date published: 2016-11-18
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Lovely Read I read this book about a month ago and loved it! It is about the death of a child of an interracial couple and their struggles to cope with the loss as well as racial tensions in the 70's. Very intriguing and moving story. A beautifully written quick read with hints of mystery and drama.
Date published: 2016-11-09
Rated 5 out of 5 by from engaging Beautifully written and engaging family drama
Date published: 2016-11-08
Rated 3 out of 5 by from Nicely Written! When I first picked up this book I wasn’t sure what to expect. I thought it was going to be a suspenseful novel. And although there is a mystery, lydia’s death, I feel the main plot evolved more around family dynamics and the different relationships between each member of the family than the mystery itself. Saying that, the writing is very poetic. The characters are developed nicely. And the story is very emotional and thought-provoking. I think if you’re looking for a good contemporary drama you will really enjoy this book. However, if you pick it up hoping for a page-turning mystery you might be a little disappointed.
Date published: 2016-08-23
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Loved this book I bought this book on a whim. From the time I started reading I had a hard time putting it down. Beautifully written.
Date published: 2016-05-17
Rated 3 out of 5 by from okay This was a good book but the degree of what does not get said between the family was pretty extreme. I found it hard to relate.
Date published: 2016-01-21
Rated 5 out of 5 by from A Powerfully Moving Story! Everything I Never Told You by Celeste Ng is an emotionally-gripping debut. Absolutely breathtaking! I haven’t read so much emotion in a book since Saint Anything (read in May 2015). Interestingly enough, both books are similar in the theme of teens not having their voices heard, but still very different in the story told. Ng makes the smooth transition from present to past to present; the same is true for the changing POV’s. She brings out empathy in the reader and I found myself appreciating the privilege I have. I want to share a quote from the first line of the first chapter which really stood out to me: “Lydia is dead. But they don’t know this yet. 1977, May 3, six thirty in the morning…” (page 1) I found myself asking why did the author decide to start the novel in this way? From the summary this isn’t a spoiler, the reader for the most part goes into the novel knowing Lydia is dead (though not how or why). Still, the reader doesn’t find out about this death like the Lee family. I came to the conclusion that perhaps Ng wants the reader to focus on how the family got to this point. How and why did this happen; could it have been prevented? As I progressed into the novel, I found that Lydia’s death was the climatic point of this family’s story, even though the reader only knows their story from the point of her death onwards. Lydia is the centre of her family’s universe, holding them together as well as shouldering a great burden. The POV’s change between Marilyn, James, Nath, Hannah, and briefly Lydia. The reader lives through the summer of 1977 as well as past memories of the Lee family. This also made Lydia’s death the pivotal point that much more certain to me. Marilyn has always wanted to be a doctor but ends up a homemaker, the thing her mother felt most important to achieve and something Marilyn hated the most. James grew up without friends, never fitting in anywhere. Both parents try to live their dreams through Lydia – becoming a doctor and being popular in school. Nath loves space but finds it frustrating to get the attention away from Lydia and onto him. He’s counting down the minutes until he leaves for college in the fall. Lydia dreads this moment; she feels like Nath is the only one who truly understands her feelings. Hannah is a ghost, the child always forgotten, but also someone who notices everything. From my impression of the synopsis I expected Lydia to actually be popular with lots of friends, which wasn’t the case here. She’s surrounded by loneliness; the frustration of not being heard is slowly building up. I would have liked more POV’s with Hannah, something I expected going into this novel. In a way, this fits with that ghostly image of Hannah, but I did think this novel would centre around her – the forgotten child. Something interesting to add, I found the writing would talk about a character/place/action as if the reader were a small child looking in on a family of dolls in a dollhouse (the Lee family being the dolls). An out-of-body experience. I find Ng’s writing extraordinary in that matter. Sometimes I even felt like a ghost embodied the pages – perhaps Lydia, who while not physically present in summer 1977, remains as a ghostly presence till the story’s end. There are so many messages that can be taken from Everything I Never Told You: empathy, damaging stereotypes, suicide, teens not being heard, grief. Whether this is a book you might or might not usually read, Ng has the ability to draw you in. A powerfully moving story. It’s so enthralling that just thinking about the ending while writing this review brings back those emotions.
Date published: 2015-11-09
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Enjoyed it - a quick read on a Sunday Celeste Ng wrote a unique book about interracial marriage and its challenges. It was essentially a family drama with grave consequences. I felt the book was a bit melancholy and the characters could have been happier had they communicate better. Nevertheless, I enjoyed the book and I look forward to reading more books by Celeste Ng.
Date published: 2015-11-09
Rated 4 out of 5 by from A page turner Ng spins a wonderful tale that at first glance seems to focus on the mystery at hand, however the reader quickly learns that it's really about each of the five family members and their need to fit in and to be seen as special. It's about our dreams and what we think people want us to be and then finding out who we really are. A great read.
Date published: 2015-08-30
Rated 4 out of 5 by from Everything they could never tell us, revealed "Everything I Never Told You" has the directness of an open letter, the personableness of a tell-all memoir, the solemnity of a confession, and the juiciness of a gossip session. It's a family drama shrouded in mystery and an exposé on the dysfunctions of a family unit, especially when secrets, obligations, identity and race play a huge part in defining their relationships with one another. It's weird to say this but I read this novel in the voice of Sarah Koenig, the host of that popular investigative podcast Serial. Even though the narrative is told from the personal and relatable perspectives that seamlessly segued from one to the next, it felt like there was an overarching voiceover that had an insight into the Lee family - someone who was looking at the past to explain the present, someone digging beneath the layers and who was putting together the pieces of a moving puzzle for us. Here was a person who was revealing everything they never could tell us. And what a deeply affecting story it is.
Date published: 2015-08-12
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Absolutely AMAZING! This book....where do I start?? Celeste Ng does an absolutely fantastic job of revealing to us the many hidden issues within a family- issues among sibling, between mother and father, and between parents and children. She helps us understand the family dynamics which lead to dysfunction and how this is passed on to our children. She does all this while keeping us on the edge of our seats with this compelling story. I could not put down this book! I was HOOKED from chapter 1. Just absolutely brilliant!
Date published: 2015-02-11

Editorial Reviews

"An Acre of Fools is beautifully written and engages the reader early and easily. The foundation of the novel poses supremely human characters facing the conflict of their actions versus spiritual teachings, the struggles of parenthood, and the manipulative devil of addiction."Ellen Wallace, True Crime Reviewer"An Acre of Fools hits hard with a huge dose of reality that many addicts (in or out of recovery) and their families face every day. Reading this novel would definitely help anyone enter into [their] world on a feeling level, not just intellectually."Tom and Dena Yohe, Hope For Hurting Parents"A haunting tale of love, hope, addiction, and betrayal. Aden James portrays a true-to-life saga of what happens to a family fighting addiction, how they are drawn closer together and pulled farther apart... From the first page, the happiness, love, sadness, faith pull you into this family's story. Addiction is real. It affects everybody it comes in contact with. How will you respond to it? What choices will you make? You'll see them all in this book. James draws from each family member, their feelings, their thoughts, realistically portraying what could happen. An Acre of Fools is the hope and destruction of life's dreams from addiction."Sally Shupe, Book Reviews, etc."I really enjoyed James's writing style. While the story is about a family dealing with drug addiction, it is also so much more than that. At times I didn't think the story was really about this family's situation, but more about the internal battle of good versus evil... The dialogue that Peter had with himself and others spoke so richly of the human condition that this story could have been anyone's... If you are looking for a book that will make you reflect on your own beliefs and life choices, then I highly recommend An Acre of Fools." Donna Huber, Girl Who Reads