An Essay on Free Will

Paperback | April 30, 1999

byPeter van Inwagen

not yet rated|write a review
In this stimulating and thought-provoking book, the author defends the thesis that free will is incompatible with determinism. He disputes the view that determinism is necessary for moral responsbility. Finding no good reason for accepting determinism, but believing moral responsibility to beindubitable, he concludes that determinism should be rejected.

Pricing and Purchase Info

$47.50

Ships within 1-3 weeks
Ships free on orders over $25

From the Publisher

In this stimulating and thought-provoking book, the author defends the thesis that free will is incompatible with determinism. He disputes the view that determinism is necessary for moral responsbility. Finding no good reason for accepting determinism, but believing moral responsibility to beindubitable, he concludes that determinism s...

Peter van Inwagen is at Syracuse University.

other books by Peter van Inwagen

Thinking about Free Will
Thinking about Free Will

Kobo ebook|Mar 31 2017

$24.29$31.50list pricesave 22%
Material Constitution: A Reader
Material Constitution: A Reader

Kobo ebook|Jan 6 1997

$55.19$69.00list pricesave 20%
Metaphysics
Metaphysics

Kobo ebook|Jul 22 2014

$37.99

see all books by Peter van Inwagen
Format:PaperbackDimensions:254 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 0.55 inPublished:April 30, 1999Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198249241

ISBN - 13:9780198249245

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of An Essay on Free Will

Reviews

Extra Content

Editorial Reviews

"This is an important book, and no one interested in issues which touch on the free will will want to ignore it."--Ethics"An extremely intelligent, resourceful, and rigorous book. It is filled with subtle, sophisticated, imaginative, and often ingenious argumentation. Van Inwagen systematically systematically puts his finger on the operative intuitions of incompatibilism, and he presents incompatibilism as forcefullyas has ever been done."--The Philosophical Review