An Ideal Husband

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An Ideal Husband

by Oscar Wilde

Dover Publications | February 5, 2001 | Trade Paperback

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Wilde's scintillating drawing-room comedy revolves around a blackmail scheme that forces a married couple to reexamine their moral standards. A supporting cast of young lovers, society matrons, and a formidable femme fatale exchange sparkling repartee, keeping the action of the play at a lively pace.

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 96 pages, 8.25 × 5.19 × 0.68 in

Published: February 5, 2001

Publisher: Dover Publications

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 048641423x

ISBN - 13: 9780486414232

Found in: Playwriting, Playwriting
Appropriate for ages: 14

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– More About This Product –

An Ideal Husband

An Ideal Husband

by Oscar Wilde

Format: Trade Paperback

Dimensions: 96 pages, 8.25 × 5.19 × 0.68 in

Published: February 5, 2001

Publisher: Dover Publications

Language: English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10: 048641423x

ISBN - 13: 9780486414232

About the Book

Scintillating drawing-room comedy revolving around a blackmail scheme that forces a married couple to reexamine their moral standards.

From the Publisher

Wilde's scintillating drawing-room comedy revolves around a blackmail scheme that forces a married couple to reexamine their moral standards. A supporting cast of young lovers, society matrons, and a formidable femme fatale exchange sparkling repartee, keeping the action of the play at a lively pace.

About the Author

Flamboyant man-about-town, Oscar Wilde had a reputation that preceded him, especially in his early career. He was born to a middle-class Irish family (his father was a surgeon) and was trained as a scholarship boy at Trinity College, Dublin. He subsequently won a scholarship to Magdalen College, Oxford, where he was heavily influenced by John Ruskin and Walter Pater, whose aestheticism was taken to its radical extreme in Wilde's work. By 1879 he was already known as a wit and a dandy; soon after, in fact, he was satirized in Gilbert and Sullivan's Patience. Largely on the strength of his public persona, Wilde undertook a lecture tour to the United States in 1882, where he saw his play Vera open---unsuccessfully---in New York. His first published volume, Poems, which met with some degree of approbation, appeared at this time. In 1884 he married Constance Lloyd, the daughter of an Irish lawyer, and within two years they had two sons. During this period he wrote, among others, The Picture of Dorian Gray (1891), his only novel, which scandalized many readers and was widely denounced as immoral. Wilde simultaneously dismissed and encouraged such criticism with his statement in the preface, "There is no such thing as a moral or an immoral book. Books are well written or badly written. That is all." In 1891 Wilde published A House of Pomegranates, a collection of fantasy tales, and in 1892 gained commercial and critical success with his play, Lady Windermere's Fan He followed this c
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Appropriate for ages: 14