An Introduction to the Law of Restitution by Peter BirksAn Introduction to the Law of Restitution by Peter Birks

An Introduction to the Law of Restitution

byPeter Birks

Paperback | September 1, 1994

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The author has taken the opportunity presented by the production of this new paperback edition to revise parts of the text and add a substantial postscript which brings the text up to date. This important work was hailed by scholars worldwide as the most significant recent work on restitution,and a landmark in the development of our understanding of this difficult subject. Students and scholars of common and civil law will welcome this paperback which brings the work to a wider readership. `The book amply repays close attention...both for its wealth of detail and for its perspicuous organisational principles'.Ethics `This is an impressive and challenging book that will be read and debated by legal scholars for some years'.Social Sciences
Peter Birks is at University of Oxford.
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Title:An Introduction to the Law of RestitutionFormat:PaperbackDimensions:522 pages, 9.21 × 6.14 × 1.22 inPublished:September 1, 1994Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198256450

ISBN - 13:9780198256458

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Editorial Reviews

`...lively and well-written book...a powerfully argued and sophisticated piece of work which shows beyond doubt that there is an independent class of claims generated by the receipt of a benefit.'Times Higher Education Supplement April 1986