Ancestry and Narrative in Nineteenth-Century British Literature: Blood Relations from Edgeworth to Hardy by Sophie GilmartinAncestry and Narrative in Nineteenth-Century British Literature: Blood Relations from Edgeworth to Hardy by Sophie Gilmartin

Ancestry and Narrative in Nineteenth-Century British Literature: Blood Relations from Edgeworth to…

bySophie GilmartinEditorGillian Beer

Paperback | November 24, 2005

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This study addresses the question of why ideas of ancestry and kinship were so important in nineteenth-century society, and particularly in the Victorian novel. Sophie Gilmartin discusses what makes people believe that they are part of a certain region, race or nation, and what part is played by superstitious belief, invented traditions and fictions. Gilmartin's study shows that ideas of ancestry and kinship, and the narratives inspired by or invented around them, were of profound significance in the construction of Victorian identity.
Title:Ancestry and Narrative in Nineteenth-Century British Literature: Blood Relations from Edgeworth to…Format:PaperbackDimensions:300 pages, 8.98 × 5.98 × 0.67 inPublished:November 24, 2005Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521023572

ISBN - 13:9780521023573

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Table of Contents

List of illustrations; Acknowledgements; Textual note: the novels; Introduction; 1. Oral and written genealogies in Edgeworth's The Absentee; 2. A mirror for matriarchs: the cult of Mary Queen of Scots in nineteenth-century literature; 3. Pedigree, nation, race: the case of Disraeli's Sybil and Tancred; 4. 'A sort of Royal family': alternative pedigrees and class in Meredith's Evan Harrington; 5. Pedigree, sati and the widow in Meredith's The Egoist; 6. Pedigree and forgetting in Hardy; 7. Geology and genealogy: Hardy's The Well-Beloved; Conclusion; Notes; Bibliography; Index.

Editorial Reviews

"...Gilmartin provides interesting readings of a number of novels often passed over in the study of Victorian fiction, and she heightens the reader's awareness of a subject that was important to the Victorians and should be given due consideration by those who would understand the age's fiction." Choice