Ancient Samnium: Settlement, Culture, and Identity between History and Archaeology by Rafael ScopacasaAncient Samnium: Settlement, Culture, and Identity between History and Archaeology by Rafael Scopacasa

Ancient Samnium: Settlement, Culture, and Identity between History and Archaeology

byRafael Scopacasa

Hardcover | July 7, 2015

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Ancient Samnium focuses on the region of Samnium in Italy, where a rich blend of historical, literary, epigraphic, numismatic, and archaeological evidence supports a fresh perspective on the complexity and dynamism of a part of the ancient Mediterranean that is normally regarded as marginal. This volume presents new ways of looking at ancient Italian communities that did not leave written accounts about themselves but played a key role in the early development of Rome, first as staunch opponents and later as key allies. It combines written and archaeological evidence to form a newunderstanding of the ancient inhabitants of Samnium during the last six centuries BC, how they identified themselves, how they developed unique forms of social and political organisation, and how they became entangled with Rome's expanding power and the impact that this had on their dailylives.
Rafael Scopacasa is a research fellow at the Department of Classics and Ancient History at the University of Exeter.
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Title:Ancient Samnium: Settlement, Culture, and Identity between History and ArchaeologyFormat:HardcoverDimensions:368 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 0.03 inPublished:July 7, 2015Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198713762

ISBN - 13:9780198713760

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Table of Contents

List of TablesList of FiguresIntroduction1. Locating the Samnites2. Society and Culture in Iron Age Samnium3. The Roman Intervention4. Settlement and Society between the Conquest and the Social War5. The Impact of RomeConclusionAppendix: List of SitesBibliography