Angel Island: Immigrant Gateway to America

Paperback | April 26, 2012

byErika Lee, Judy Yung

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From 1910 to 1940, over half a million people sailed through the Golden Gate, hoping to start a new life in America. But they did not all disembark in San Francisco; instead, most were ferried across the bay to the Angel Island Immigration Station. For many, this was the real gateway to theUnited States. For others, it was a prison and their final destination, before being sent home. In this landmark book, historians Erika Lee and Judy Yung (both descendants of immigrants detained on the island) provide the first comprehensive history of the Angel Island Immigration Station. Drawing on extensive new research, including immigration records, oral histories, and inscriptions onthe barrack walls, the authors produce a sweeping yet intensely personal history of Chinese "paper sons," Japanese picture brides, Korean students, South Asian political activists, Russian and Jewish refugees, Mexican families, Filipino repatriates, and many others from around the world. Theirexperiences on Angel Island reveal how America's discriminatory immigration policies changed the lives of immigrants and transformed the nation. A place of heartrending history and breathtaking beauty, the Angel Island Immigration Station is a National Historic Landmark, and like Ellis Island, it is recognized as one of the most important sites where America's immigration history was made. This fascinating history is ultimately aboutAmerica itself and its complicated relationship to immigration, a story that continues today. Winner of the Asian/Pacific American Librarians Association Award for Adult Non-Fiction Winner of the Western History Association Caughey Prize

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From 1910 to 1940, over half a million people sailed through the Golden Gate, hoping to start a new life in America. But they did not all disembark in San Francisco; instead, most were ferried across the bay to the Angel Island Immigration Station. For many, this was the real gateway to theUnited States. For others, it was a prison and...

Erika Lee is Professor of History and Asian American Studies at the University of Minnesota. She is the author of At America's Gates: Chinese Immigration during the Exclusion Era, 1882-1943. Judy Yung is Professor Emerita of American Studies at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Her books include Island: Poetry and History of ...

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:432 pages, 9.25 × 6.12 × 0.68 inPublished:April 26, 2012Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199896151

ISBN - 13:9780199896158

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Table of Contents

ForewordPrefaceIntroduction1. Guarding the Golden Gate: The Life and Business of the Immigration Station2. "One Hundred Kinds of Oppressive Laws": Chinese Immigrants in the Shadow of Exclusion3. "Obstacles This Way, Blockades That Way": South Asian Immigrants, U.S. Exclusion, and the Gadar Movement4. "A People without a Country": Korean Refugee Students and Picture Brides5. In Search of Refuge, Freedom, and Opportunity: Russians, Jews, and Mennonites in the Promised Land6. El Norte: Mexican Immigrants on Angel Island7. From "U.S. Nationals" to "Aliens": Filipino Migration and Repatriation through Angel Island8. Saving Angel IslandEpilogue: The Legacy of Angel IslandAppendix AAppendix BAppendix CNotes/ Bibliography