Anger, Revolution, and Romanticism by Andrew M. StaufferAnger, Revolution, and Romanticism by Andrew M. Stauffer

Anger, Revolution, and Romanticism

byAndrew M. Stauffer

Paperback | January 29, 2009

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The Romantic age was one of anger and its consequences: revolution and reaction, terror and war. Andrew M. Stauffer explores the changing place of anger in the literature and culture of the period, as Englishmen and women rethought their relationship to the aggressive passions in the wake of the French Revolution. Drawing on diverse fields and discourses such as aesthetics, politics, medicine, and the law, and tracing the classical legacy the Romantics inherited, Stauffer charts the period's struggle to define the relationship of anger to justice and the creative self. In their poetry and prose, Romantic authors including Blake, Coleridge, Godwin, Shelley, and Byron negotiate the meanings of indignation and rage amidst a clamorous debate over the place of anger in art and in civil society. This innovative book has much to contribute to the understanding of Romantic literature and the cultural history of the emotions.
Title:Anger, Revolution, and RomanticismFormat:PaperbackDimensions:240 pages, 9.02 × 5.98 × 0.55 inPublished:January 29, 2009Publisher:Cambridge University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0521100690

ISBN - 13:9780521100694

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Table of Contents

Introduction: fits of rage; 1. Towards Romantic anger; 2. Burke, Coleridge and the rage for indignation; 3. Inflammatory reactions; 4. Provocation and the plot of anger; 5. Shelley and the masks of anger; 6. Byron's curse; Epilogue; Notes; Bibliography; Index.

Editorial Reviews

Anger, Revolution and Romanticism is a thoughtful and wide-ranging study of an absorbing topic. This book will be long valued for its nuances exploration of the ever-timely question of how words on the page aim to inflict violence and cause harm."
-Kim Wheatley, College of William and Mary, 1650-1850: Ideas, Inquiries, and Aesthetics in the Early Modern Era