Anglos And Mexicans In The Making Of Texas, 1836-1986

Paperback | January 1, 1987

byDavid Montejano

not yet rated|write a review

A major work on the history of Mexicans in Texas and the relations between Mexicans and Anglos.

Pricing and Purchase Info

$29.95

Out of stock online

From Our Editors

This book presents a different kind of history, an interpretive, history that would outline the connections between the past and the present while maintaining a focus on Mexican-Anglo relations.

From the Publisher

A major work on the history of Mexicans in Texas and the relations between Mexicans and Anglos.

From the Jacket

This book presents a different kind of history, an interpretive, history that would outline the connections between the past and the present while maintaining a focus on Mexican-Anglo relations.

David Montejano is Professor of Ethnic Studies and History at the University of California, Berkeley
Format:PaperbackDimensions:397 pages, 8.97 × 6.08 × 1.1 inPublished:January 1, 1987Publisher:University Of Texas Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0292775962

ISBN - 13:9780292775961

Look for similar items by category:

Customer Reviews of Anglos And Mexicans In The Making Of Texas, 1836-1986

Reviews

Extra Content

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments1. IntroductionPart One. Incorporation, 1836-19002. The Rivalship of Peace3. Cattle, Land, and Markets4. Race, Labor, and the FrontierPart Two. Reconstruction, 1900-19205. The Coming of the Commercial Farmers6. The Politics of ReconstructionPart Three. Segregation, 1920-19407. The Structure of the New Order8. The Mexican Problem9. The Web of Labor Controls10. The Culture of Segregation11. The Geography of Race and ClassPart Four. Integration, 1940-198612. The Demise of "Jim Crow"13. A Time of InclusionAppendix. On Interpreting Southwestern HistoryNotesBibliographyIndex

From Our Editors

This book presents a different kind of history, an interpretive, history that would outline the connections between the past and the present while maintaining a focus on Mexican-Anglo relations.

Editorial Reviews

The success of this award-winning book is in its honesty, scholarly objectivity, and daring, in the sense that it debunks the old Texas nationalism that sought to create anti-Mexican attitudes both in Texas and the Greater Southwest.