Animal Theology by Andrew Linzey

Animal Theology

byAndrew Linzey

Paperback | January 1, 1995

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Animal rights is animal theology. The author argues that historical theology, creatively defined, must reject humanocentricity. He questions the assumption that if theology is to speak on this issue, 'it must only do so on the side of the oppressors.' His theological query investigates not only the abstractions of theory, but also the realities of hunting, animal experimentation, and genetic engineering. He is an important, pioneering, Christian voice speaking for those who cannot speak for themselves.

About The Author

Andrew Linzey is Director of the Oxford Centre for Animal Ethics, Honorary Research Fellow at St Stephen's House, Oxford and a member of the Faculty of Theology in the University of Oxford.  He is Professor of Animal Theology at the University of Winchester and Professor of Animal Ethics at the Graduate Theological Foundation, Indiana.
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Details & Specs

Title:Animal TheologyFormat:PaperbackDimensions:224 pages, 8.5 × 5.25 × 0.7 inPublished:January 1, 1995Publisher:University of Illinois Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0252064674

ISBN - 13:9780252064678

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Animal rights is animal theology. The author argues that historical theology, creatively defined, must reject humanocentricity. He questions the assumption that if theology is to speak on this issue, 'it must only do so on the side of the oppressors.' His theological query investigates not only the abstractions of theory, but also the realities of hunting, animal experimentation, and genetic engineering. He is an important, pioneering, Christian voice speaking for those who cannot speak for themselves.