Anne Of Green Gables by L. M. MontgomeryAnne Of Green Gables by L. M. Montgomery

Anne Of Green Gables

byL. M. Montgomery

Paperback | July 30, 2013

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It's a million times nicer to be Anne of Green Gables than Anne of nowhere in particular, isn't it?'


     My dislikes: Being an orphan, having red hair, people twitting about my red hair, being called 'carrots' by Gilbert Blythe.

     My likes: Living at the Green Gables with Marilla and Matthew Cuthbert, my bosom-friend Diana, dresses with puff sleeves, renaming Barry's pond the Lake of Shining Waters, coming top of the class.

     My regrets: Dying my hair green. Smashing a slate over Gilbert Blythe's head.

     My dream: To tame my temper. To be good (this is an uphill struggle ). To grow up to have auburn hair!
L. M. MONTGOMERY, known as Maud, was born on Prince Edward Island, off the coast of Canada, in 1874. Maud's mother died when she was just a baby and so she had a rather unhappy childhood growing up in the care of her strict grandparents. She was just sixteen when she had her first poem published. As a young woman she worked as a teache...
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Title:Anne Of Green GablesFormat:PaperbackDimensions:496 pages, 7.4 × 5.1 × 1.2 inPublished:July 30, 2013Publisher:Random House UKLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0099582643

ISBN - 13:9780099582649

Customer Reviews of Anne Of Green Gables

Reviews

Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great book This book is great . My absetion with this book all started at the beginning of grade 4 . My teacher read this novel to the class. I loveed the everything . I read the book at least 23 times. I love the book!
Date published: 2014-12-03

Read from the Book

Daring was the fashionable amusement among the Avonlea small fry just then. It had begun among the boys, but soon spread to the girls, and all the silly things that were done in Avonlea that summer because the doers thereof were “dared” to do them would fill a book by themselves. . . . Now, to “walk” board fences requires more skill and steadiness of head and heel than one might suppose who has never tried it. But Josie Pye, if deficient in some qualities that make for popularity, had at least a natural and inborn gift, duly cultivated, for walking board fences. Josie walked the Barry fence with an airy unconcern which seemed to imply that a little thing like that wasn’t worth a “dare.” Reluctant admiration greeted her exploit, for most of the other girls could appreciate it, having suffered many things themselves in their efforts to walk fences. Josie descended from her perch, flushed with victory, and darted a defiant glance at Anne. Anne tossed her red braids.“I don’t think it’s such a very wonderful thing to walk a little, low, board fence,” she said. “I knew a girl in Marysville who could walk the ridge-pole of a roof.” “I don’t believe it,” said Josie flatly. “I don’t believe anybody could walk a ridge-pole. You couldn’t, anyhow.”“Couldn’t I?” cried Anne rashly.“Then I dare you to do it,” said Josie defiantly. “I dare you to climb up there and walk the ridge-pole of Mr. Barry’s kitchen roof.”Anne turned pale, but there was clearly only one thing to be done. She walked towards the house, where a ladder was leaning against the kitchen roof. All the fifth-class girls said, “Oh!” partly in excitement, partly in dismay.“Don’t you do it, Anne,” entreated Diana. “You’ll fall off and be killed. Never mind Josie Pye. It isn’t fair to dare anybody to do anything so dangerous.”“I must do it. My honour is at stake,” said Anne solemnly. “I shall walk that ridge-pole, Diana, or perish in the attempt. If I am killed you are to have my pearl bead ring.”Anne climbed the ladder amid breathless silence, gained the ridge-pole, balanced herself uprightly on that precarious footing, and started to walk along it, dizzily conscious that she was uncomfortably high up in the world and that walking ridge-poles was not a thing in which your imagination helped you out much. Nevertheless, she managed to take several steps before the catastrophe came. Then she swayed, lost her balance, stumbled, staggered and fell, sliding down over the sun-baked roof and crashing off it through the tangle of Virginia creeper beneath — all before the dismayed circle below could give a simultaneous, terrified shriek.If Anne had tumbled off the roof on the side up which she ascended Diana would probably have fallen heir to the pearl bead ring then and there. Fortunately she fell on the other side, where the roof extended down over the porch so nearly to the ground that a fall therefrom was a much less serious thing. Nevertheless, when Diana and the other girls had rushed frantically around the house — except Ruby Gillis, who remained as if rooted to the ground and went into hysterics — they found Anne lying all white and limp among the wreck and ruin of the Virginia creeper.“Anne, are you killed?” shrieked Diana, throwing herself on her knees beside her friend. “Oh, Anne, dear Anne, speak just one word to me and tell me if you’re killed.”To the immense relief of all the girls, and especially of Josie Pye, who, in spite of lack of imagination, had been seized with horrible visions of a future branded as the girl who was the cause of Anne Shirley’s early and tragic death, Anne sat dizzily up and answered uncertainly: “No, Diana, I am not killed, but I think I am rendered unconscious.”

Editorial Reviews

"Aficionados of the auburn-tressed waif will find Anne of Green Gables lavishly illustrated."
Smithsonian Magazine