Approaching the End: A Theological Exploration of Death and Dying by David Albert Jones

Approaching the End: A Theological Exploration of Death and Dying

byDavid Albert Jones

Hardcover | August 30, 2007

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David Albert Jones considers two basic questions: how can we live well in the face of death? and when, if ever, is it legitimate deliberately to bring human life to an end? He focuses upon the distinct theological approaches to death shown by four outstanding Christian thinkers: Ambrose ofMilan, Augustine of Hippo, Thomas Aquinas, and Karl Rahner. Jones's aim is not primarily to make a contribution to the history of theology, but rather, through engagement with the thought of theologians of the past, to reflect on some of the practical and existential issues that the approach ofdeath presents for all of us.

About The Author

David Albert Jones is Academic Director, St Mary's College Twickenham.
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Title:Approaching the End: A Theological Exploration of Death and DyingFormat:HardcoverDimensions:248 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 0.79 inPublished:August 30, 2007Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0199287155

ISBN - 13:9780199287154

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Table of Contents

1. The need for a theological approach to death2. In every way a good thing: death in the thought of Ambrose of Milan3. Not good for anyone: death in the thought of Augustine of Hippo4. An illuminating comparison: Augustine and Ambrose on the theology of death5. In one way natural, in another unnatural: death in the thought of Thomas Aquinas6. Both something suffered and a human act: death in the thought of Karl Rahner7. Final reflections