Archaeology and Language in the Andes

Hardcover | June 29, 2012

EditorPaul Heggarty, David Beresford-Jones

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The Andes are of unquestioned significance to the human story: a cradle of agriculture and of 'pristine' civilisation with a pedigree of millennia. The Incas were but the culmination of a succession of civilisations that rose and fell to leave one of the richest archaeological records onEarth. By no coincidence, the Andes are home also to our greatest surviving link to the speech of the New World before European conquest: the Quechua language family. For linguists, the native tongues of the Andes make for another rich seam of data on origins, expansions and reversals throughoutprehistory. Historians and anthropologists, meanwhile, negotiate many pitfalls to interpret the conflicting mytho-histories of the Andes, recorded for us only through the distorting prism of the conquistadors' world-view.Each of these disciplines opens up its own partial window on the past: very different perspectives, to be sure, but all the more complementary for it. Frustratingly though, specialists in each field have all too long proceeded largely in ignorance of great strides being taken in the others. Thisbook is a long overdue meeting of minds, bringing together a worldwide cast of pre-eminent scholars from each discipline. Here they at last converge their disparate perspectives into a true cross-disciplinary focus, to weave together a more coherent account of what was, after all, one and the sameprehistory.The result, instructive also far beyond the Andes, is a rich case-study in the pursuit of a more holistic vision of the human past.

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The Andes are of unquestioned significance to the human story: a cradle of agriculture and of 'pristine' civilisation with a pedigree of millennia. The Incas were but the culmination of a succession of civilisations that rose and fell to leave one of the richest archaeological records onEarth. By no coincidence, the Andes are home also...

Dr. Paul Heggarty is Senior Scientist in the Department of Linguistics at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig. Dr. David Beresford-Jones is Research Associate in the Department of Linguistics at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, and Fellow of the McDonald Institute for Ar...

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Format:HardcoverDimensions:440 pagesPublished:June 29, 2012Publisher:Oxford University PressLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0197265030

ISBN - 13:9780197265031

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Table of Contents

David Beresford-Jones and Paul Heggarty: Introduction - Archaeology and Language in the Andes: A Much-Needed ConversationColin Renfrew: Archaeology and Language in the Andes: Some General Models of ChangeDavid Beresford-Jones and Paul Heggarty: Broadening Our Horizons: Towards an Interdisciplinary Prehistory of the AndesPieter Muysken: Modelling the Quechua-Aymara Relationship: Sociolinguistic Scenarios and Possible Archaeological EvidencePeter Kaulicke: On the Origins of Social Complexity in the Central Andes and Possible Linguistic CorrelationsRichard Burger: Central Andean Language Expansion and the Chavin Sphere of InteractionGeorge F. Lau: The 1st Millennium ad in North Central Peru: Critical Perspectives on a Linguistic PrehistoryWillem Adelaar: Cajamarca Quechua and the Expansion of the Huari State 155William H. Isbell: Middle Horizon Imperialism and the Prehistoric Dispersal of Andean LanguagesGordon McEwan: Indicators of Possible Driving Forces for the Spread of Quechua and Aymara Reflected in the Archaeology of CuzcoRodolfo Cerron-Palomino: Unravelling the Enigma of the 'Particular Language' of the IncasBill Sillar: Accounting for the Spread of Quechua and Aymara Between Cuzco and Lake TiticacaGary Urton: The Herder-Cultivator Relationship as a Paradigm for Archaeological Origins, Linguistic Dispersals and the Evolution of Record Keeping in the AndesAnne-Marie Hocquenghem: How did Quechua Reach Ecuador?Elizabeth DeMarrais: Quechua's Southern Boundary: The Case of Santiago del Estero, ArgentinaConclusion - A Cross-Disciplinary Prehistory for the Andes?Paul Heggarty and David Beresford-Jones: Surveying the State of the Art