Architecture Of Humanism: A Study In The History Of Taste by Geoffrey ScottArchitecture Of Humanism: A Study In The History Of Taste by Geoffrey Scott

Architecture Of Humanism: A Study In The History Of Taste

byGeoffrey Scott

Paperback | June 25, 1999

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Reissued in trade format with a new introduction, The Architecture of Humanism offers a brilliant analysis of the theories and ideas behind much of nineteenth- and twentieth-century architecture. It discusses the classical tradition as reflected in the architecture of Renaissance and Baroque Italy and the role given the human body in that tradition. It is recommended reading for all architecture students, and essential for those interested in the revival of classical architecture.
Henry Hope Reed is founder and president of Classical America and is the author of numerous books, including The Golden City and The New York Public Library. He lives in New York City.
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Title:Architecture Of Humanism: A Study In The History Of TasteFormat:PaperbackDimensions:240 pages, 8 × 5.5 × 0.55 inPublished:June 25, 1999Publisher:WW NortonLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0393730352

ISBN - 13:9780393730357

Reviews

From Our Editors

This compelling text examines the theories and ideas behind much of 19th- and 20th-century architecture. In The Architecture of Humanism, Geoffrey Scott discusses the classical tradition as reflected in the architecture of Renaissance and baroque Italy, as well as the role the human body played in that tradition. This is the perfect guide for both students and teachers of architecture.

Editorial Reviews

A new edition of this minor classic of architectural criticism is welcome not only because it is still worth reading but also because it is so apposite, for the architectural situation a hundred years ago was similar to our own. . . .In a period such as our own, where architecture is so dominated by conceptual interpretations, by a seemingly endless succession of -isms, it is useful to be reminded that buildings are—or should be— made to be experienced and enjoyed. — Witold Rybczynski (The New York Review of Books)