Aria by Nazanine HozarAria by Nazanine Hozarsticker-burst

Aria

byNazanine Hozar

Paperback | June 11, 2019

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National Bestseller

This extraordinary, gripping debut is a rags-to-riches-to-revolution tale about an orphan girl's coming of age in Iran.

"Aria is a feminist odyssey, about a girl in a time of intolerance as the revolution in Iran is breaking out . . . a poised and dramatic historical novel with contemporary relevance." --John Irving

"Here comes a sweeping saga about the Iranian revolution as it explodes--told from the ground level and the centre of chaos. A Doctor Zhivago of Iran." --Margaret Atwood (on Twitter)


It is the early 1950s in a restless Iran, a country powerful with oil wealth but unsettled by class and religious divides and by a larger world hungry for its resources. One night, a humble driver in the Iranian army is walking home through a neighbourhood in Tehran when he hears a small, pitiful cry. Curious, he searches for the source, and to his horror comes upon a newborn baby girl abandoned by the side of the road and encircled by ravenous dogs. He snatches up the child, and forever alters his own destiny and that of the little girl, whom he names Aria.

Nazanine Hozar's stunning debut takes us inside the Iranian revolution--but seen like never before, through the eyes of an orphan girl. Through Aria, we meet three very different women who are fated to mother the lost child: reckless and self-absorbed Zahra, wife of the kind-hearted soldier; wealthy and compassionate Fereshteh, who welcomes Aria into her home, adopting her as an heir; and finally, the mysterious, impoverished Mehri, whose connection to Aria is both a blessing and a burden. The novel's heart-pounding conclusion takes us through the brutal revolution that installs the Ayatollah Khomeini as Iran's supreme leader, even as Aria falls in love and becomes a young mother herself.

Heather's Review

I’ve always loved great book recommendations, so when Margaret Atwood tweeted, “Here comes a sweeping saga about the Iranian revolution as it explodes - told from the ground level and the centre of chaos. A Doctor Zhivago of Iran...,” I was immediately intrigued to read Aria. And it certainly did not disappoint! I think there is a r...

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NAZANINE HOZAR was born in Tehran, Iran, and lives in British Columbia, Canada. Her fiction and non-fiction have been published in The Vancouver Observer and Prairie Fire magazine.
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Title:AriaFormat:PaperbackProduct dimensions:456 pages, 8.3 × 5.7 × 1.2 inShipping dimensions:8.3 × 5.7 × 1.2 inPublished:June 11, 2019Publisher:Knopf CanadaLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0345811828

ISBN - 13:9780345811820

Reviews

Rated 3 out of 5 by from Average story - one time read Set between 1953 and 1981, Aria is the story of a young girl growing up in Iran during the revolution. The books starts with a baby who is found by a middle class man in a garbage dump. She is taken in by Behrouz, who brings her into his home and father's her. The story follows Aria, her transformation and the three significant women who play the role of her mother figures throughout her life. Aria shares a unique relationship with each character and walks us through the first 28 years of her life. The novel highlights the unrest in Iran as the backdrop along with an insight into the class differences within the country and the challenges that come with it. I found the first half of the book slow and wasn't sure where the story was going. Nevertheless, the second half of the book picked up as the story develops and more characters are introduced/ linked up. I did enjoy the insight into this period of unrest in Iran, however felt the themes of the novel could have been more gripping. The story felt like it jumped at times and did not seem to flow seamlessly. Overall, I would rate this book 3.5/5.
Date published: 2019-09-10
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Dissapointing I did not enjoy reading this book. I found it had too many characters. The story line was not interesting. I struggled to complete it.
Date published: 2019-09-07
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Heather's Pick I’ve always loved great book recommendations, so when Margaret Atwood tweeted, “Here comes a sweeping saga about the Iranian revolution as it explodes - told from the ground level and the centre of chaos. A Doctor Zhivago of Iran...,” I was immediately intrigued to read Aria. And it certainly did not disappoint! I think there is a real fearlessness to Nazanine Hozar’s writing. Some of her characters are exceptionally scarred and flawed; survivors themselves in a sea of great oppression and incredible injustice for women. But at the centre is this inevitably strong girl who carries us through this entire period. We get to know her and actually experience the changes in Iran from a very different perspective than I’ve ever read about. I felt as though I was right there with her amidst the anxiety and hope for real change. It’s a story in which love, redemption, and strength shine forth in the midst of darkness, and I believe Aria will stay with you for a while.
Date published: 2019-08-27
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Excellent in very way This book is beautifully written and is such a moving storyline as well as a great insight into the history of the iranian revolution. incredible read.
Date published: 2019-07-02

From the Author

National BestsellerThis extraordinary, gripping debut is a rags-to-riches-to-revolution tale about an orphan girl's coming of age in Iran."Aria is a feminist odyssey, about a girl in a time of intolerance as the revolution in Iran is breaking out . . . a poised and dramatic historical novel with contemporary relevance." --John Irving"Here comes a sweeping saga about the Iranian revolution as it explodes--told from the ground level and the centre of chaos. A Doctor Zhivago of Iran." --Margaret Atwood (on Twitter)It is the early 1950s in a restless Iran, a country powerful with oil wealth but unsettled by class and religious divides and by a larger world hungry for its resources. One night, a humble driver in the Iranian army is walking home through a neighbourhood in Tehran when he hears a small, pitiful cry. Curious, he searches for the source, and to his horror comes upon a newborn baby girl abandoned by the side of the road and encircled by ravenous dogs. He snatches up the child, and forever alters his own destiny and that of the little girl, whom he names Aria.Nazanine Hozar's stunning debut takes us inside the Iranian revolution--but seen like never before, through the eyes of an orphan girl. Through Aria, we meet three very different women who are fated to mother the lost child: reckless and self-absorbed Zahra, wife of the kind-hearted soldier; wealthy and compassionate Fereshteh, who welcomes Aria into her home, adopting her as an heir; and finally, the mysterious, impoverished Mehri, whose connection to Aria is both a blessing and a burden. The novel's heart-pounding conclusion takes us through the brutal revolution that installs the Ayatollah Khomeini as Iran's supreme leader, even as Aria falls in love and becomes a young mother herself.

Read from the Book

Trucks rumbled along the gravel road in the dead of the night, vibrating like a line of ants, thick tarpaulins shaking as engines whirred and wheels lifted dust, fogging the cold February air. Behrouz Bakhtiar closed his eyes. A film of dirt coated the skin covering the thin bones of his face. He watched by moonlight as four eight-wheelers filled with young men from the provinces rolled away. He would not be driving the young men home as usual. This was the first night of his four days off. He would instead place a cigarette in his mouth, light it with the last match he had in his pocket, and walk home down the red mountain, where earth min­gled with snow, then stride through the city from north to south. This was his Tehran, and he was its secret guardian, the angel perched on the mountaintop counting buildings, trees, lights, and people who walked about like insects, unaware of being watched. Strange how people are, Behrouz thought, the cigarette between his thin lips. And he began his walk down and through the city just as he had planned, just as he had been anticipating all day. He slid down the slopes effortlessly, taking a drag from his cigarette every once in a while. He whistled when the mood struck him. He had walked this path many times, since he had first learned to drive up the mountain. How old had he been, seventeen? He was thirty-three now, so that made it sixteen years. With time off mul­tiplied by sixteen, that made about four thousand times he had walked up and down the slopes of Darakeh. Sometimes, of course, the generals gave him permission to drive down and save himself the three-hour walk. And when Behrouz first got married, the general in command had not only encouraged him to drive, he’d let him off early to encourage hus­bandly duties—but not without reminding Behrouz how old his new wife was. “Think that wife of yours’ll be able to handle fresh little you?” the general had said. Behrouz had married Zahra when he was nineteen, upon his father’s urging. “The Prophet was a boy, his wife was forty when he took her,” his father had said. But Zahra was no prophet’s wife. She was thirty-six, had never married, and had a son, Ahmad, who was the same age as Behrouz. Ahmad hadn’t come to the wedding. That night, when Behrouz asked his new wife where her son was, Zahra replied, “Somewhere in the prison halls.” Then she had forced herself on him. When he’d first started driving trucks in the army, Behrouz had been more talkative. The soldiers liked him. They would reveal themselves, telling him about their lives on the farms or in small towns. If they were Tehrani boys, they talked about their schools and their girlfriends. The only one who had never opened up was a member of the royal family—a cousin of the king. But Behrouz supposed that was different. He had been ordered not to look the boy in the eyes. Behrouz had begun learning to drive at sixteen because he wasn’t strong enough to fight, or smart enough to read. His father had taught him the basics. He could have sold bread on the streets like his father, or worked the oil mines like his uncles. But the one time he had suggested this, his father slapped him so hard, Behrouz saw stars for days. And that was the end of that. Now, as he walked, the red dirt beneath his boots remained frozen. Three nights ago there had been a storm. But now the snow had settled and was packed along the path. The walk wasn’t as bad as he’d expected. He swiftly made it down Darakeh, to the northern tip of Pahlavi Street. Here there were cobblestone roads and the houses were old. He’d heard that the king’s father once lived here. He walked past the old car parked along the street, searching his pocket in vain for another smoke. A man was walking toward him. “Could I trouble you for a cigarette?” Behrouz asked. He had learned how to speak politely, like the people did up here. The man pulled out a single smoke from his pack. Behrouz took it and placed it between his lips. The man held out a lighter, its flame flickering in the slight breeze. “Thank you,” Behrouz said, and began to walk away. “No money?” the man said. Behrouz waited. “No money?” the man asked again. “You want money for the light?” Behrouz said. “What do you think?” Behrouz searched both pockets awkwardly. “Only kidding. Stupid man.” The man laughed as he walked away. Behrouz stepped up his pace and cut through alleyways. He knew he was somewhere in Youssef-Abad district, midway through the city. He normally walked the main street, but tonight he felt like a change. Streams of sewer water ran in the gutters, but blos­soming mulberry trees flanked the roads. This district was one of his favourites. He liked the corner shops and the cinema and cafés, which were old but patronized by rich people. He was staring at the letters on the front of the cinema when he heard the cry—like a cat in pain. He walked closer to where he thought the sound was coming from, but water gurgling in the gutter muffled its location. He crossed into another alley—nothing there. He continued to move from alley to alley, jumping over gut­ters. The more he found nothing, the more urgently he searched. His only help was the moon; there were no lights in the nearby homes; it seemed the rest of the world was asleep. He finally reached the mulberry tree, which was flanked by rows of garbage. Staring up at him was a pack of wild dogs. He imagined them tearing the tiny creature who had made the sound limb from limb. He grabbed a stick from the ground and charged. But none of the dogs moved. How long had they been there? As he neared, the dogs sat and watched quietly. At last, Behrouz bent down and lifted the baby into his arms. The dogs sniffed his feet, turned and left. He sped toward the edge of town, past abandoned buildings in which the poor secretly lived, past stacks of cardboard where the even poorer slept. He wondered how long the child had gone without food. The stores were still closed, but his wife must have bought some milk, he thought frantically. The baby didn’t look more than three days old. His head hurt. The stars whirled in the sky. At last, not far in the distance, he saw the pale outline of his house. For three hours, Behrouz sat in his living room, trying to feed the child. He had woken a sleeping neighbour, who had found some milk, though the baby threw up most of it. Now, once again, he dipped the cap of his fountain pen into the bowl of milk beside him on the floor. He held the tiny vessel to the baby’s lips, careful not to tilt it too far. The milk flowed onto her lips, but only a few drops got in. He wiped her face clean with the back of his pinky finger. In a minute, he would try again. Zahra was sleeping. Her son, Ahmad, out of jail only two days, had left his dirty boots on the kitchen table. He’d landed in prison for cutting someone’s fingers off, and Behrouz knew he would already be back to stealing. By morning, Behrouz was struggling to keep his eyes open. From the north-facing window, he watched the rising sun. The rays crept toward him, along the floor. In the bedroom, his wife still slept soundly. He got up, walked into her room, and stood at her bedside, the baby to his chest. Zahra lay tightly wrapped in her blan­kets. She was fair-skinned, with straight, fine hair that turned a shade of light brown in summer. She liked to curl it these days, using little plastic rolls. He returned to the living room and laid the baby gently on the floor. Then he walked quietly back to the bedroom. “We have to talk,” Behrouz whispered. Zahra covered her eyes to block the sun. “You’re home. Figured you’d be killing yourself with opium all night.” “Come with me.” He pulled her out of bed. In the living room, the baby’s arms and legs shook and she struggled like an overturned insect. “I think she’s hungry,” Behrouz said. “I gave her some milk, but she hardly drank. She needs to suck it, I think.” Zahra backed away from the infant. “Where did you find it? Is this some mess of yours we have to fix?” Her voice was sharp. Behrouz picked up the baby. “Nothing like that,” he said. “Last night in the alley, there was waste all around her. I found her in Youssef-Abad.” “That’s the North-City,” Zahra said. “What were you doing with those people? Listen to me: You put that baby where you found it so the trash who are her people can take it back.” “There were dogs around her. I don’t know what they wanted, but—” “Get it out of my house. And I know you do your own nasty business. You never touch me—as if I were made of fire and would burn you. But men are men. You must be touching somebody.” Zahra grabbed the baby’s face. “Did you take a look at its eyes? They’re blue. I swear on Imam Hossein you’ve brought a blue-eyed devil into my house.” “Her eyes are green,” Behrouz said. “No. There’s blue in them. You’ve brought evil into this house, Mr. Bakhtiar.” Behrouz listened silently as Zahra walked away and into the bed­room, still shouting at him. Fourteen years with her and the rage had only worsened. He looked at the baby. Zahra was right. There was blue in those eyes. He couldn’t think how to comfort her. It had been so easy when he’d been a little boy and would play pretend. He would rock his baby, feed his baby, just like the neighbourhood girls did. And he’d been careful to never let his father know. But now, here was a real baby. The only thing he could think to do was speak to it, human to human. Not human to doll or master to slave. Yes, he would do what humans had always done, from the first crack of life. “Want me to tell you a story?” he whispered to the little girl. Her wrinkled eyelids were shut tight, as if she would never want to face the world. “Want me to tell you the story of the Tooba Tree?” Behrouz said again. And so he began, hoping to drown out Zahra’s shouts. “Past the clouds and the sky, way up in heaven, there is a tree, the Tooba Tree, from whose roots spring milk, and honey, and wine.” “I curse the day I married a boy,” Zahra yelled from the other room. Behrouz kept on: “Milk to nourish you, honey to sweeten you, wine to take you to the land of dreams.” Zahra yelled louder. “Think you were my saviour, Mr. Bakhtiar? You only made hell last longer.” Behrouz lifted the baby closer to his lips and whispered in her ear. “The Tooba Tree belongs to the orphans of heaven, for there is nothing that matters more, my little one.” He stopped and listened for Zahra again, but she had finished her rant. The baby had opened her eyes but was falling back asleep. “You sang to me from that alley,” he whispered to her, “and I heard your song. Yet if I hadn’t, and if you had not been saved, the Tooba Tree would have been waiting for you and you would have been all right just the same.” Behrouz paused. He wondered if saving the little girl had been the right thing to do after all. But, since he had saved her and forced her into this thing called life, there was one more thing he needed to do. “I used to love music, you know, when I was a little boy,” he said, putting his pinky finger in the baby’s mouth so she could suckle. “I used to sing, in secret, so my father wouldn’t know. I used to sing arias. Know what they are? Little tales, cries in the night. If you sing an aria, the world will know all about you. It will know your dreams and secrets. Your pains and your loves.” Behrouz heard Zahra throw a pillow against the bedroom wall, and paused. After a few moments, hearing nothing more, he kept on. “I’ll name you Aria, after all the world’s pains and all the world’s loves,” he said. “It will be as if you had never been aban­doned. And when you open your mouth to speak, all the world will know you.”

Editorial Reviews

NATIONAL BESTSELLEROne of Chatelaine’s “Best Books for Summer Reading” [2019]One of The Globe and Mail’s “Four debuts to watch” [April 20, 2019]One of The Globe and Mail’s “37 spring books to dive into” [April 2019]One of CBC Books’s “28 works of Canadian fiction to watch for in spring 2019”“Aria is a feminist odyssey, about a girl in a time of intolerance as the revolution in Iran is breaking out . . . a poised and dramatic historical novel with contemporary relevance.” —John Irving   “Here comes a sweeping saga about the Iranian revolution as it explodes—told from the ground level and the centre of chaos. A Doctor Zhivago of Iran.” —Margaret Atwood (on Twitter)   “The summer’s must-read book. . . . [W]hile it is a historical novel set around the Islamic Revolution, it is also very much about personal relationships—their power to destroy, and their potential to be destroyed by political events.” —Marsha Lederman, The Globe and Mail“[An] epic journey. . . . Hozar . . . captures the sweep of Iran’s political history.” —Chatelaine   “To Hozar’s considerable credit, the characters feel complex and naturally developed; they have the vitality of living people. . . . Aria is, at its heart, a story not about a place, or about historical events, but about the human need to belong.” —Robert Wiersema, Toronto Star   “Hozar has a cinematic style to her writing that keeps it very visual.” —Vancouver Sun   “A sweeping tale of perseverance and the strength of the human, especially female, spirit.” —The Source