Aristocratic Women And The Literary Nation, 1832-1867

Perfect | January 1, 2009

byMuireann O'Cinneide

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Aristocratic women flourished in the Victorian literary world, their combination of class privilege and gendered exclusion generating distinctively socialized modes of participation in cultural and political activity. Their writing offers an important trope through which to consider the nature of political, private and public spheres. This book is an examination of the literary, social, and political significance of the lives and writings of aristocratic women in the mid-Victorian period.

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Aristocratic women flourished in the Victorian literary world, their combination of class privilege and gendered exclusion generating distinctively socialized modes of participation in cultural and political activity. Their writing offers an important trope through which to consider the nature of political, private and public spheres. ...

MUIREANN O'CINNEIDE is a Lecturer in English at St. Peter's College at University of Oxford. Her research centers on women's writing, politics, and empire, particularly travel literature.
Format:PerfectDimensions:241 pages, 8.5 × 5.6 × 1 inPublished:January 1, 2009Publisher:Palgrave MacmillanLanguage:English

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0230546706

ISBN - 13:9780230546707

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Table of Contents

Contents
Acknowledgements
Introduction
PART I: CLASS AND AUTHORSHIP
Aristocratic Lives: Life-Writing, Class and Authority
Dilettantes and Dandies: Authorship and the Silver Fork Novel
Silly Novels and Lady Novelists: Inside the Literary Marketplace
PART II: WRITING THE NATION STATE
Wrongs Makes Rebels: Polemical Voices
The Spectacle of Fiction
Affairs of State: Aristocratic Women and the Politics of Influence
Conclusion: 1867 and Beyond
Works Cited
Notes

Editorial Reviews

"[This] book will be of interest to both feminists and historians of the novel." —Miriam Elizabeth Burstein, College at Brockport, SUNY