Aristotles Two Systems

Paperback | April 30, 1999

byDaniel W. Graham

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In this study, Daniel W. Graham addresses two major problems in interpreting Aristotle. First, should we reconcile the apparent inconsistencies of the corpus by assuming an underlying unity of doctrine (unitarianism), or by positing a sequence of developing ideas (developmentalism)? Secondly,what is the relation between the so-called logical works on the one hand and the physical-metaphysical treatises on the other? Although the problems appear to be unrelated, Graham finds that the key to the first lies in the second, and in doing so provides the first major alternative to theunitarian approach since Jaeger's pioneering developmental study of 1923.

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In this study, Daniel W. Graham addresses two major problems in interpreting Aristotle. First, should we reconcile the apparent inconsistencies of the corpus by assuming an underlying unity of doctrine (unitarianism), or by positing a sequence of developing ideas (developmentalism)? Secondly,what is the relation between the so-called ...

Daniel W. Graham, Associate Professor of Philosophy, Brigham Young University, Utah.

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Format:PaperbackDimensions:374 pages, 8.5 × 5.43 × 0.07 inPublished:April 30, 1999Publisher:Oxford University Press

The following ISBNs are associated with this title:

ISBN - 10:0198243154

ISBN - 13:9780198243151

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`This persuasive view of Aristotle has not previously been developed in anything like such a careful and wide-ranging way. It is written with the clarity which one has come to expect in the best Aristotelian scholarship, and is an important contribution to ancient philosophy.'Times Higher Education Supplement